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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently scored this beauty on offerup (a craigslist like app) and was wondering if I should keep it or sell it. I think its a beauty (i almost believe it was never used) but I am also in a tight financial situation, I just had to get it at the price it was being sold for. Thanks!
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The frame looks in incredible condition. However, the great name of Mondonico has been desecrated by the addition of flat bars. If it your size, its a keeper
 

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It's a beautiful frame, and probably cost quite a bit brand new. But I can't see anyone wanting a steel framed bike for the track these days, and any hipster wanting a single-speed to get around town with probably would balk at spending that kind of money for it.

But you could get lucky and some cultured single-speed rider who appreciates a fine work of art might offer you a decent price for it.

If you take it apart, check inside the bottom bracket for little pins holding the tubes in place before brazing. That will mean it's a frame actually built by Antonio Mondonico. If it doesn't have the pins, it was made after Antonio retired, and not sure by who. One built by Antonio himself should hold more value.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's a beautiful frame, and probably cost quite a bit brand new. But I can't see anyone wanting a steel framed bike for the track these days, and any hipster wanting a single-speed to get around town with probably would balk at spending that kind of money for it.

But you could get lucky and some cultured single-speed rider who appreciates a fine work of art might offer you a decent price for it.

If you take it apart, check inside the bottom bracket for little pins holding the tubes in place before brazing. That will mean it's a frame actually built by Antonio Mondonico. If it doesn't have the pins, it was made after Antonio retired, and not sure by who. One built by Antonio himself should hold more value.
Thanks for the responses so far! I will be changing it to proper pista bars as soon as I can (the bike is back home while im at school).

I figure its going to be a hard sale considering its a single speed that as you said would only be for the enthusiast/collector. I have yet to ride it but I feel like its going to convince me to keep it once I do, considering its the perfect size. Any idea as to how those pins look? I only saw an M on the bottom and figured even if it wasn't a real Mondonico/fake it was still worth what I paid.
 

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They'd look pretty similar to this.

Rather than tack braze the joints to hold them in place for final brazing, Antonio used the old school(and time-consuming) method of drilling a hole through the lug/tube and pounding a small pin into place to hold them together. After brazing was done, the pin would be filed down flush with the lug surface. This way the tubes were only heated once, and back in the old days, when heating weakened the metal, this was seen as beneficial to making a stronger joint. Not so necessary in these days, with tubes made of steel that gets stronger when heated.



 

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Search eBay sold listings to get an idea, realizing that eBay prices will generally be 10-20% higher than most local markets.

I don't know much about track bikes but I won't let that prevent me from making a wild a$$ guess. It seems to me that steel track bikes from quality builders sell for higher prices than comparable road frames (e.g. Bianchi Pista vs a Bianchi SLX road frame) so that leads me to think there is some demand for a good steel track bike. That is a well equipped bike so I wouldn't think $800 is an out of line price, maybe even a little more.
 

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If there's a person at home riding or handling this bike, tell them to be extra careful with the frame tubing. Columbus Life/Spirit is extremely thin in places (down to about 0.4 mm) and dents very easily. That doesn't mean it's weak. In fact, the exceptional strength of Life/Spirit allows it to be drawn so thin in the first place. It's all about saving weight, so I would also suggest to replace that boat anchor (about 500 gram) saddle with something much lighter if someone shows interest in buying the bike and will almost certainly pick it up to check how light it is.
 
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