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re-hash of known info or click bait.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
More of a troll I guess. :) But honestly, I hadn't seen the info on flex/wheel deviation before, especially given that thru-axle is supposed to, in part, address front end stiffness. I can only see forks getting burlier (and heaver) if this is a real and widespread issue.
 

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In the real world, deviation is unnoticeable while riding. That is likely because we steer for balance.

In addition, with disc popularity entering it's 4th year on road bikes, there has not been an epidemic of failed forks--even with standard skewers.

And finally, when cyclists begin demanding road bikes lighter than 14lbs, the weight of disc brakes may become a factor.

More of a troll I guess. :) But honestly, I hadn't seen the info on flex/wheel deviation before, especially given that thru-axle is supposed to, in part, address front end stiffness. I can only see forks getting burlier (and heaver) if this is a real and widespread issue.
 

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More of a troll I guess. :) But honestly, I hadn't seen the info on flex/wheel deviation before, especially given that thru-axle is supposed to, in part, address front end stiffness. I can only see forks getting burlier (and heaver) if this is a real and widespread issue.
Disc's were needed to compensate for carbon rims poor brake performance and now front suspension will be needed to compensate for overly stiff forks.

Soon PEDs will be obligatory to allow the motor to utilize all the mechanical performance gains.
 

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Disc's were needed to compensate for carbon rims poor brake performance and now front suspension will be needed to compensate for overly stiff forks.

Soon PEDs will be obligatory to allow the motor to utilize all the mechanical performance gains.
This is mostly nonsense. It is true that carbon brake tracks took rim braking from poor to awful.

The reality is that both brake tracks lack consistency and precision. For those who ride mostly in the mountains, even aluminum tracks caused dramatic changes in braking power during rapid deceleration. When combined with grit laden snow melt running across roads, deceleration was anybody's guess when brake levers were applied (as compared to hydraulic discs). I agree that this issue was exacerbated with carbon rims.

I don't know of anybody with hydro discs who is planning on going back to rim brakes, even those who traditionally ride aluminum rims.
 

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I don't know of anybody with hydro discs who is planning on going back to rim brakes, even those who traditionally ride aluminum rims.
They'd have to sell or dispose their relatively new bike -- a bitter pill for most.
Whereas rim brake bikes are older on average, people would be more likely to "trade up" a 5-10 yr old bike, than a 1-2 yr old bike.
 

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They'd have to sell or dispose their relatively new bike -- a bitter pill for most.
Whereas rim brake bikes are older on average, people would be more likely to "trade up" a 5-10 yr old bike, than a 1-2 yr old bike.
I'm in my fourth season on hydraulic road discs. I have a really nice Tarmac s-works SL3 with campy record 11 that has become a wall ornament in my den since I bought the hi-mod with discs and di2. Most of the folks that I ride with also still have their previous rim brake bikes gathering dust.

I'll likely never sell my tarmac as it's much like having a 32 ford coupe with suicide doors in the garage. They both serve as a reminder of how much things have evolved since the olden days.
 

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I may go disc at some point but not until they get their sh*t together.

probably 5-7 years.
 

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I have three disc brake bikes - and I weigh 220+ pounds. I do not notice any fork twist at all.

The article is referring to a bike owned by someone submitting a question to Lennard. In his answer he refers to bikes with skewers, and early disc brake bike designs.

Newer bikes designed specifically for disc brakes do not experience this, at least not to any significant degree that it affects the bike handling or is noticeable to the rider.
 

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I could feel fork twist on my QR disc road bike when coming in hot to a switchback and braking hard. I recognized the feeling immediately from the old days of dics on mtbs, it's enough to be felt, it's not like it sends you into the weeds. I added a thru axle and it's gone. It's worth noting that this is on a first gen disc road bike, I'd be very surprised if any bikes for these days have the slightest bit of an issue.
 
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