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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never broken a chain but have been doing some extremely remote rides so got to thinking I should prepare for that just in case.

I use shimano chains and don't have any problems with the pin, at home where I have a good rugged chain tool, good lighting, and take my time. But I'm thinking on the road where I'd rather carry a smaller chain tool and who knows what circumstances I'd be doing the repair under that a quick link might make more sense (please correct me if I'm wrong about that).

So, what's the most moron proof quick link that would be good to carry for emergency use? Or are they all pretty much the same in this regard?
I use Dura Ace or Ultegra 11 speed chains. Assuming any link that works on one works on the other.
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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SRAM and KMC are available nearly everywhere.

BTW, if you've installed a new chain before, but never 'broke' one, I'd bet that your chain is too long.
 

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SCRAM links are a PITA to use, unless your in the garage, u might as well carry pins. The best easiest link is connex.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
SRAM and KMC are available nearly everywhere
BTW, if you've installed a new chain before, but never 'broke' one, I'd bet that your chain is too long.
I've broken lots in that context of the word and chain length is just fine. I assumed the context of being prepared for it during remote rides would have explained what I mean by broken in this case. I've never had a chain come apart during a ride is what I meant.

Thanks, but although I wouldn't go to the end of the earth for the best one availability isn't what I care about. Do you find one easier and more fool proof than the other?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
SCRAM links are a PITA to use, unless your in the garage, u might as well carry pins. The best easiest link is connex.
Thanks. That's what googling indicates too. Except I saw some dudes saying for Shimano chains one should use the Campy connex link not the one for the wipperman's shimano compatible chain. But couldn't find a definitive answer on that and got confused.
Is that true do you know?
 

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Wipperman are the easiest to install, and can be removed by hand too, but not totally moron proof as they have a right way and wrong way.

As with most things, if you follow the instructions you should be OK.

Same comment applies to KMC and SRAM. Nothing difficult, no right or wrong way. No special tools to install. Just assemble with the link at the bottom. Rotate chain slowly to get link at the top. Lock rear wheel and press on pedal, and link will snap together. These require a tool to remove though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wipperman are the easiest to install, and can be removed by hand too, but not totally moron proof as they have a right way and wrong way.

As with most things, if you follow the instructions you should be OK.

Same comment applies to KMC and SRAM. Nothing difficult, no right or wrong way. No special tools to install. Just assemble with the link at the bottom. Rotate chain slowly to get link at the top. Lock rear wheel and press on pedal, and link will snap together. These require a tool to remove though.
Thanks. Think I'll try a KMC or Sram then. Sounds easy enough and I'll practice on a chain I plan to replace anyways at home just to make sure I'm good with it.
I read that pins are stronger so will stick with those generally and this is just for emergency on the road.
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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Thanks. Think I'll try a KMC or Sram then. Sounds easy enough and I'll practice on a chain I plan to replace anyways at home just to make sure I'm good with it.
I read that pins are stronger so will stick with those generally and this is just for emergency on the road.
Unless you do a shift under load and jam the chain...it is very unlikely you'll sheer a masterlink. I think in 10 years I've snapped maybe two--and both were boneheaded shifts under load. Lube them well initially, since the links come bone-dry and that is a recipe for the masterlink pivots lengthening faster than the rest of the chain.

KMC or SRAM are great. Wipperman 11s are way more expensive than the competition, last I looked, for really no benefit.
 

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Go ahead and try SCRAM links, but do it in the garage first. The you'll throw that shiet in the trash.
 

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+1 for KMC. I use them on my Campy and KMC branded chains.

Easy to put on, although you'll want a master link tool to take it off. I use the Park one.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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Wipperman are the easiest to install, and can be removed by hand too, but not totally moron proof as they have a right way and wrong way.

As with most things, if you follow the instructions you should be OK.

Same comment applies to KMC and SRAM. Nothing difficult, no right or wrong way. No special tools to install. Just assemble with the link at the bottom. Rotate chain slowly to get link at the top. Lock rear wheel and press on pedal, and link will snap together. These require a tool to remove though.
This is incorrect. The 'arrow' on the side of the link MUST point in the direction of chain travel on the outside of the chain...away from the bike. Meaning the pin that is in the quick link must be on the leading end of that link so it hits the backside of the chainring first. If you install it the other way that can lead to broken quick links.

Go ahead and try SCRAM links, but do it in the garage first. The you'll throw that shiet in the trash.

You have no clue about quick links.
 

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I guess I was familiar with SRAM 10-speed only. But I've used KMC both 10 and 11 and don't see any arrow. Don't see anything about directionality in instructions either.

Yellow Tool Metal Bicycle part Household hardware

Just checked SRAM 11-speed. Yep there's an arrow.

So, the vote for most idiot proof is KMC.
 

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It only makes sense to install the KMC link the same way. They are functionally identical to the SRAM link. As oriented in that photo the link would be on the bottom run of the chain, not the top.
 

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any of the 3 mentioned can be installed by hand in a remote location. if one has broken a chain, one might still need a chain tool to remove the bad bits, but after that - no problem.

it looks like only one person here could get the kmc on correctly though. the rest of us are on a 50% chance :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Gentlemen, the OP was questioning using at a remote location, not in a shop full of tools room.
Right. With a seatbag friendly size chain tool probably as part of a multi-tool. I'll stick with the pin for regular chain installs but I think a quick link would be easier on the road given that I'd rather not carry a full size chain tool. There's also the issue of breaking off the pin but I assume I could manage that without pliers.

Although if I find those small chain tools are fine for pins I could just carry a few pins. I'l play around with a spent chain to find out.

Hopefully this is all moot but with the remoteness of some of the rides I do I want to be prepared for the 1 in a million, so to speak, chance I snap a chain.
 

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I've been using Quick links since 8speed. Sram and KMC. I've never broken one. And I reuse them (even though they say not to, shhhhh). I'm no Andre Greipel, but at 165# I'm not really a light weight. They're plenty strong.
Once you use them, you'll never want to use the silly replacement pins.

I carry one in all my bags. There's no reason not to. While I've never had to use them on the road, I've saved a handful of riders with broken chains. One time we had a guy with a broken RD. We broke the chain, made it a single speed, and quick linked the chain back together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
They're plenty strong.
Once you use them, you'll never want to use the silly replacement pins.
I know it's one in a million vs 1.1 in a million but I think it's fact that pins are stronger so that's why I wanted to keep using them. But now that I think about it, if carrying a spare quick link who cares if one breaks.
 

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I know it's one in a million vs 1.1 in a million but I think it's fact that pins are stronger so that's why I wanted to keep using them. But now that I think about it, if carrying a spare quick link who cares if one breaks.
I would dispute that the replacement pins are stronger. They also have the potential of incorrect installation. Push them in a little too far, or not enough, and they can break open.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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I've been lucky and have never broken a chain on the road.....yet. I once bailed out a rider whose chain broke as I had a mini chain tool on my multi-tool and some extra pins.

I still carry a mini chain tool and extra pins, but also carry both a 10-speed and 11-speed KMC quick link. These are a quicker and easier repair, but I still carry both.

If it were me, I would replace that chain after the ride. Where there is one broken link, there are probably more not far behind.
 
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