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Some standards

jhenry4 said:
any thoughts, rants, etc. on the best or worst clincher tires?
Your title specifically asked about durability, so the standard answer is the Specialized Armadillo. Conti Gatorskins also get good reviews. Your post asks about "best or worst" but that is different than most durable, in most people's minds. E.g. I would never use Armadillos because the ride is so crappy and I don't have durability problems, so they would definitely NOT be the "best" tire for me.
 

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jhenry4 said:
any thoughts, rants, etc. on the best or worst clincher tires?
Vittoria Rubinos are cheap, durable, reliable and have decent handling and rolling properties for a trainer clincher.
 

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Yeah, you'll need to be a lot more specific.

Kerry Irons said:
Your title specifically asked about durability, so the standard answer is the Specialized Armadillo. Conti Gatorskins also get good reviews. Your post asks about "best or worst" but that is different than most durable, in most people's minds. E.g. I would never use Armadillos because the ride is so crappy and I don't have durability problems, so they would definitely NOT be the "best" tire for me.
As Kerry said, it's pretty much the Armadillo if durability and reliability are your prime objectives. I use them on two of my bikes that see frequent use through the rainy Pac NW winters, and the last thing I want to do is fix flats in the rain. The trade-offs are definitely noticeable; the handling is sub-par, they're heavy and they have a noticeably harsher ride than the lighter race tires I use for races or good weather riding. But I don't really care about those things when I'm riding my heavy cross bike during winter base-training. I've gotten more than 3 times the mileage on an Armadillo compared to tires like Michilen Pro Races and Vittoria Open Corsas. Flats are few and far between. HTH.
 

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Totally off-topic...

My banana is dancier than yours. ;)

 

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Veloflex pave and Vittoria corsa great tires overall. both on sale at probikekit.com free shipping. i bought a pair yesterday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
just to clarify

my appologies for the vague title. here's where i was trying to go with this. i'm building up a new cannondale and am looking for a fast, durable, high quality clincher that's suitable for racing yet durable enough for moderate training.

to bound the problem:
- continental supersonics - not durable enough
- specialized armadillos - not fast enough
- the veloflex, vittoria's and continentals were along the lines of what i was considering but i didn't want to bound the problem that much.

thanks for the posts thus-far and keep 'em coming.
 

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jhenry4 said:
my appologies for the vague title. here's where i was trying to go with this. i'm building up a new cannondale and am looking for a fast, durable, high quality clincher that's suitable for racing yet durable enough for moderate training.

to bound the problem:
- continental supersonics - not durable enough
- specialized armadillos - not fast enough
- the veloflex, vittoria's and continentals were along the lines of what i was considering but i didn't want to bound the problem that much.

thanks for the posts thus-far and keep 'em coming.
You may want to look at Continental GP 4 Seasons.
 

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In bounds

jhenry4 said:
looking for a fast, durable, high quality clincher that's suitable for racing yet durable enough for moderate training.
With this in mind, an upper end tire in the 220-250 gm range from Conti, Michelin, Vredestein, Vittoria, etc. will be functionally interchangable. Whether you have more flats on any one of these will be due to luck, not the tire. The performance differences between them are minimal. Go for the one that you can get the cheapest or matches your color preferences.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
With this in mind, an upper end tire in the 220-250 gm range from Conti, Michelin, Vredestein, Vittoria, etc. will be functionally interchangable. Whether you have more flats on any one of these will be due to luck, not the tire. The performance differences between them are minimal. Go for the one that you can get the cheapest or matches your color preferences.
I would disagree, an open tubular will ride far superior when compared to a standard tire (ie Michelin Pro Race). They will not be as durable though, but Vitt Open Corsa CX are tough to beat for ride quality, rolling resistance, and cornering capability.
 

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lots of choices...

michelin carbons and continental gp3000/4000 are some of my preferred... michelin's pro race i had durability issues w/side wall blow outs. vittoria's rubino are decent too.

john
 

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Do not use Hutchinsons. I got flats almost every third or fourth ride out with those.

I've been riding Vredsteins for the last year or so, been through three sets and haven't flatted once. Maybe I've been lucky but they're the best tire I've used so far, and Performance usually has them on sale for around $20.
 

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Mr. Scary said:
I would disagree, an open tubular will ride far superior when compared to a standard tire (ie Michelin Pro Race). They will not be as durable though, but Vitt Open Corsa CX are tough to beat for ride quality, rolling resistance, and cornering capability.
The Open Corsa CX are not really training tires and are way less puncture resistant as the other tires mentioned.
 

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Vredestein Fortezza SL

I have become very impressed w/ Vredestein Fortezza SL's clinchers. They weigh 201g on my digital scale (700 x 23) (kI think the standard Fortezzas weigh around 220g) Have not had any problems yet and very good traction.
 

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Maxxis Hors Categorie......and Mich. Carbons. The Maxxis feel more better in the wet to me, and they're as puncture resistant as the Carbons. Working life is about the same between the two.
 

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edlouie said:
Do not use Hutchinsons. I got flats almost every third or fourth ride out with those.
Funny, I've been rolling on Hutchinson Carbon Comps, and with 3500 miles on the rear and 5000 miles on the front, I've yet to have a single flat. The tires are damn near worn to the cord and have tons of minor nicks on them, but are still holding air as well as they did when they were new.

They need to be replaced badly and I'll probably buy the same brand and style again.
 

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Mr. Scary said:
I would disagree, an open tubular will ride far superior when compared to a standard tire (ie Michelin Pro Race). They will not be as durable though, but Vitt Open Corsa CX are tough to beat for ride quality, rolling resistance, and cornering capability.
Pray tell, what's the difference between an "open tubular" and a "standard tire?" Are they built differently? Made from different materials? Does it describe a tire that operates under different physics? Something tells me that "open tubular" is a term invented by a marketing department.
 

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edlouie said:
Do not use Hutchinsons. I got flats almost every third or fourth ride out with those.

I've been riding Vredsteins for the last year or so, been through three sets and haven't flatted once. Maybe I've been lucky but they're the best tire I've used so far, and Performance usually has them on sale for around $20.
I've been using Hutchinson Fusion Comps and I haven't had one flat in 4,000 miles. They're not as long lasting as some tires, but flats haven't been a problem.
 

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Open Tubular is an oxymoron

likeguymontag said:
Pray tell, what's the difference between an "open tubular" and a "standard tire?" Are they built differently? Made from different materials? Does it describe a tire that operates under different physics? Something tells me that "open tubular" is a term invented by a marketing department.
As I guess you've inferred, "Open Tubular" is an oxymoron - if it's open, how can be tubular, and if it's tubular, how can it be open?

Given the meaninglessness of the name, tire company marketing departments can define "Open Tubular" any why they wish too, although I guess there's no getting around the fact that they really are clincher tires.

All that being said, most tire companies appy the term "Open Tubular" to their clincher tires that share some of the same components or manufacturing processes as their tubular tires. For example Vittoria "Open Tubulars" use what is essentially the same casing fabric and treads as their tubular tires, but instead of sewing the edges of the casing into a tubular shape, they glue the edges of the casing around kevlar cords to former a clincher bead. Does that make Vittoria "Open Tubulars" superior to other clinchers? Maybe, maybe not - but like with other things, the quality of the end product has many variables, so inserting one particular process may or may not make it better.
 
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