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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the "Beginner's Corner" because it's early Feb. and I'm "beginning again."

Last spring I bought two bikes and a lot of gear. Started riding again on the road a fair amount, made some significant gains in fitness and then just burned out on the roard riding.

I see where I "over trained." At 57 I can't ride day in and out like I did when I was 15. We should note too that I get chronic bouts of depression. Depression hit about August, and I put on some 40 lbs. I stopped reading the forums here . . . vegged out.

So, now I'm reading some more on the forums. The bikes are tuned up. Weather is getting better, and I'm getting some rides in on the MTB. Early season stuff along with some other "cross training" (Property clean up on 3.5 acres).

I'm sure I'm not alone in all this. We can't all train for the Tour de France. I'm just glad to get back on the bike, hope to be able to get back into some of my pants here soon.

This forum helps me connect with the motivation end of things. The crew at the LBS was glad to see me too.

Thanks for that.
 

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Check your goals

I think the main reason people burn out on any activity is that they are motivated by the "wrong" goals. IOW, goals that are strictly base on some sort of achievement rather than enjoyment. With achievment goals, you are either "done" once you reach the goal, or you have "failed" if you don't reach the goal. If your focus is on enjoying the activity, then the activity itself is the reward rather than something external that you use for motivation. For me, cycling is the reward - an enjoyable activity that is worth doing for itself. I love the open road, the fitness, the relaxation, the changing seasons, the riding partners, being outside, and on and on. Motivate yourself in this way, and you'll reach your goal - to ride the bike. :)
 

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Don't worry about age

Not sure what to tell you as far as the depression aspect. That's out of my realm of knowledge. But don't let age be a factor. This is a pic of my friend Joe. He's nearing 60 and rides like a maniac. One of the faster MTB nuts that I know and one heck of a road rider as far as endurance. He spins four days a week with me during the winter and hits the gym every morning to lift light weights. He's dating a woman 15 years younger (and admittedly cuter :) than himself. It's all in how you approach life I think! The biggest thing that seems to work for him is a good network of friends/acquaitances to ride with and the desire to just keep going no matter what.

Have you been riding by yourself or with friends? I'm more of a loner type person so riding by myself is a feeling of great freedom, but for others it's as boring as can be. I could see where riding by yourself might cause you to burn out after a while. I wish I had some more advice short of start out easy and keep picking it up. You'll be in shape by summer again. Good to see you're on the MTB as a season starter. Good luck.
 

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I'm with Kerry--doing it for enjoyment is very important. In fact, I've found that my fitness and endurance improved faster when I determined that what I needed was just to get out and ride--not train. My mantra became "just getting the miles" without worrying about how fast I went or how many I got in per ride.

My average pace hasn't gone down any*, and my enjoyment and endurance have improved. Also, my required recovery time has dropped significantly because I don't beat my body up trying to go so hard.

Now that most of my ride time consists of me marveling over how much I love to ride, I have found that I can sneak in a little extra effort here and there and it feels like fun instead of "training." Still, my only "performance" goal is "get better." Just about any positive part of a ride can fulfill that!

A late addition: I suffer from depressive periods too, and goal setting is always risky for me--when I'm feeling down, I can use missed goals to beat myself up with pretty effectively, which only kills my motivation. When I'm just riding because I like it, there's no failure to grab onto--only success, which makes me feel better, which makes it easier to get on the bike next time, which is a success, which makes me feel better, which...a virtuous cycle.


*I believe that my pace has stayed the same because of what I learned in motorcycle racing: "It's easier to make up time where you're slow than where you're fast." My speed on the flats is a little lower, but that leaves me with more energy to speed up my climbing, which was REALLY slow before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good feedback !!! Thanks for the motivation !!!

This may turn into a "Blog Thread" . . . So would that be "bread" or a "throg" ???

I'm retired. That means I get to train any time I want. I have a full gym in the garage and a bunch of other "toys." Also, I raced seriously from 14 yrs old to graduation, and then some "comebacks" . . . Used to run marathons, serious about sea kayaking. I suppose what I'm trying to say is that I understand how to get into shape. I just need some motivation and direction.

We're getting it.

Wind storms on the Oregon coast took out a couple sitka spruce on my property. So the current workout has been "lumberjack." Cut and move limbs, "over the fence limb toss." Roll logs of firewood -- 20" dia. X 2" and sorta wet. 8 lb splitting maul, 6 lb wedge. Then there's the chain saw stuff, and chipping the limbs (more lifting).

It's a good workout and I enjoy it.

I enjoy riding, just to be riding . . . but the weight was getting at a point where I worry about the wheels on the road machine (240 lbs). Weather's getting better, days are getting longer. Daffodils and crocus have up up here for a month! Crocus are blooming flowers.

Ahhhhhhhhh, but the best part . . . I'm eating better, eating right. Stepped on the scale this PM and I'm down about 8 lbs. Might be hydration, but I'll count it as 8 lbs.

We're making some progress.

Ohhhhhh yeah . . . no problem with being 58. Beats the bejeezus out of the alternative.

Mostly I end up riding alone . . . out in the country, open roads not much traffic. There are group rides after Daylight Savings kicks in. They're in the evenings on Thurs. Ahhhhhhh, but the reason I mostly ride alone is because I'm riding while the rest of the world is at work. *L*

This "Throg" is an open invite for riders to get back in shape. Let's hear your comback stories! Beginner's Corner is a good spot for it. Getting back to the bike after some time away . . . getting a grip on the gut and being out of breath at the top of the stairs!

Let's hear what you're up to !!!


(She IS cuter than he is!)

Here's the tree, just missed the barn.
 

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Hardy Cyclamens said:
I enjoy riding, just to be riding . . . but the weight was getting at a point where I worry about the wheels on the road machine (240 lbs).
As long as you have properly-tensioned spokes, anything with 32 spokes should be OK with a 240lb rider (better be--I weigh that much). 28 might be OK for the front, even, though I don't go that far myself.

I know that to people who have no business weighing 240, it seems a ridiculous weight that would crush anything, but it's not so bad. I ride a normal bike with normal wheels, and don't have any durability problems.

But you know this. You just let yourself believe otherwise for a while. Your weight is coming down anyway, according to your account, so your wheels are fine. RIDE! Woo Hoo!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Road bike is Trek 1500 -- Bontrager select wheels, spoked 16/20.

I have a Schwinn 564 Aluminum. It's a Klein frame design, wheels spoked 32's and 36's -- two sets.

Also a Trek Cruiser Classic, balloon tire, coaster brake. Here's a photo. I like this bike a lot. Nice at the beach on weekends.

I worry about the wheels on the Trek.
 

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Hardy Cyclamens said:
Road bike is Trek 1500 -- Bontrager select wheels, spoked 16/20.

I have a Schwinn 564 Aluminum. It's a Klein frame design, wheels spoked 32's and 36's -- two sets.

Also a Trek Cruiser Classic, balloon tire, coaster brake. Here's a photo. I like this bike a lot. Nice at the beach on weekends.

I worry about the wheels on the Trek.
Yeah, the Trek wheels seem a little risky at 240, unless the roads are glassy-smooth where you are. If I had zero percent body fat and cut off an arm I think I'd still be nervous on those--I never could get used to the low-spoke-count wheels.

It's Schwinn time for you, I'd say. That ought to be a plenty nice bike anyway.
 

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Been up to 240 at my heaviest on these wheels, about 3 years now.

On the original topic--I hear ya'. As I got worse and worse (performance, weight) over the years, I found out that the motivation was the ride itself. Bummed I couldn't go as far, climb as high, at least without feeling torched. Now I "train" for the ride itself. Just want to make MTB easier, maybe a crit again, or at least club rides without having to be off the back. Not saying it well, but what I'm trying to say is similar to what some other above have said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It's coming down.

Did the "lumberjack workout" again today. Now it's clouding up again.

I just like to ride, and the fitness comes along with it.
 
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