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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I usually love riding my bike. just lately I've been blah. i'm riding a single speed mountain bike until I can afford my road bike. we have a brand new boardwalk not 1/4 mile from my house and I usually ride up there. 2.2 miles one way. loaded with girls in shorts or yoga pants. dolphins. whales. ospreys. walkers, runners, bikers etc........ gears are pretty low so almost everybody passes me by. been bored with it so I've been riding the street last few rides. no dedicated bike lanes but a small adequate shoulder. I just haven't been seeing results and i'm a little discouraged about that. i'm a good 80 pounds over my ideal weight. quit smoking and injured my back pretty good so i'm just starting to feel human again.
 

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mix it up with other activities.

I love pedaling so I've always done it for enjoyment.
 

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I've ridden a lot of miles this year. More than ever by far. I started feeling a little burnout in the spring (I had spent a lot of time on the trainer this winter recovering from being hit by a car).

What cured my burnout was getting a gravel/adventure bike, and being able to ride in new, awesome places I couldn't go before. I started taking a lot of pictures, sharing routes with like minded friends in the area, etc... It really rejuvenated me.

That said, I'm physically tired. My body needs a break. I have a couple of 'scheduled' rides (Gran Fondo's and Charity Rides) coming up, and I'm going to endeavor to stay fit for them, but otherwise I'm going to dial back the mileage a bit, and let my body recover.
 

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try refurbishing a bike to take ownership in the whole process.

motivates me to ride it and continue to improve it. when i'm done, i look for another one...
 

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Doing the same ride over and over again can get old, regardless of your level of fitness. I get motivated by trying to do something different each ride. Every year I highlight a map with the roads I've ridden so far that year, and then seek out the roads I haven't. It doesn't take me long to saturate all of the roads close to home, so by now I have to venture further and further out to find virgin territory. But at least when I do cover a new road, I'm satisfied that I did something different.
 

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Doing the same ride over and over again can get old, regardless of your level of fitness. I get motivated by trying to do something different each ride. Every year I highlight a map with the roads I've ridden so far that year, and then seek out the roads I haven't. It doesn't take me long to saturate all of the roads close to home, so by now I have to venture further and further out to find virgin territory. But at least when I do cover a new road, I'm satisfied that I did something different.
This is good. You can do something similar with data if you have it. Go further, go faster, do something different... I like to work on something every ride.
 

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When motivation is lacking for me, something new helps me get going - new parts, riding partner, routes - Even just taking casual rides and enjoying the scenery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I guess it's just more of a chore for me right now because I "have to" ride because of my weight and certain health concerns. couple of the things my dad left me, in addition to his sense of humor...... diabetes. HBP. kidney stones. and a LOVE of food. so in addition to a possible abdominal aortic aneurism due to HBP and a sedentary lifestyle brought on by a pretty serious back injury, if I stop moving at this point, I guess i'll die. trying to drop 80 pounds isn't easy especially with my love of food. my metabolism slowed considerably when after 35 years I decided to stop smoking, partly because of the expense. now i'm trying to squeeze in an hour or so of riding, at least 4 days a week. my current work schedule is prohibitive of an active and healthy lifestyle. I guess i'm just venting and hoping for more time in the day. lotto would be nice.
 

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Cyclists that are pretty good riders are out there because it's a way of life. It's what they do and when they ride the world is a better place for them. I would say that a 2.2 mile ride one way will not be enough riding to see some results in your conditioning or your weight. Slowly build up to more challenging rides and fitness, weight reduction and equipment will happen for you. Remember it's a lifetime activity.
 

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2.2 miles at a time one way may not be making you an Olympic athlete, but every bit helps. It may start slowly at first, but keep it up, you will start to see progress.

Once you get comfortable with that, maybe try mixing it up. Try to go on one longer ride per week. Then maybe bump it up to two, then maybe to three. Personally, I love to go explore routes and roads I haven't taken before when I go out. I feel like it makes me more familiar with my neighborhood.

It is tough going starting out, but don't give up. I have lost about 40 pounds in the last year since I started riding again as an adult. Most of my trips were commutes to and from work, which is a 1 mile trip for me. This isn't ideal for building fitness or losing weight, but a short trip can have its perks. When you aren't far from home, you can afford to really go for broke and push yourself harder than you can when you are a long ride from home. I still commute to work, but as the weight has come off and my fitness has improved, my additional rides have gotten longer and faster. If you keep doing the work, results WILL happen.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

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Repeatedly citing "love of food" as though it were an immutable condition that forces you to overeat is a cop-out. With the little bit of moderate exercise you're getting, you have to eat less to lose weight. So eat less. You can still love food, and not eat too much of it. You stopped smoking, so you have the capacity to discipline yourself.

Good luck.
 

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Maybe at 80 pounds overweight cycling isn't the choice of activity for you yet. The reality is now that for exercise to impact weight loss, it has to be a lot. REcent info indicates all that pandering about a little exercise being worthwhile is being excoriated. a couple of miles on a bike is not exercise. If you want to lose weight it will have to be in the kitchen. People who do lose weight with exercise do a lot of of it, I would say that at least 1.5 hours a day of sweaty exercise, every day, makes an impact (IME). As you know, your biggest challenge is all mental. Do it, or don't, if you have no dependants and no shits to give. Plenty of the rest of the world does the same. Your only motivation is intrinsic. No one can care more than you. No your family, your children, your wife.
 

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Maybe at 80 pounds overweight cycling isn't the choice of activity for you yet. The reality is now that for exercise to impact weight loss, it has to be a lot. REcent info indicates all that pandering about a little exercise being worthwhile is being excoriated. a couple of miles on a bike is not exercise. If you want to lose weight it will have to be in the kitchen. People who do lose weight with exercise do a lot of of it, I would say that at least 1.5 hours a day of sweaty exercise, every day, makes an impact (IME). As you know, your biggest challenge is all mental. Do it, or don't, if you have no dependants and no shits to give. Plenty of the rest of the world does the same. Your only motivation is intrinsic. No one can care more than you. No your family, your children, your wife.
^^^ This. Your weight is determined in the kitchen not in a gym or on a bike. Losing weight is very simple. Eat fewer calories than you use. Find the amount of calories you need to maintain your weight on a sedentary lifestyle. Eat less than that. How much less will tell you how much weight you will lose and how fast. The math will not lie.

Food is a sticky wicket fo some extent, because you can't avoid it... But you can take control of what and how much of it you eat. It begins by knowing what you are putting in your mouth. That's data. If you have the data you can control the outcome. Period.
 

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You may be board and not seeing results because your spinning around on an under geared single speed mountain bike getting passed by everybody. I'd get board with that pretty quick, too. And you're not going to see much fitness improvement if you're just cruising around in a gear that's easy peasy, either.

When do you foresee the ability to afford that road bike you mentioned? You might consider lowering your $$ target if it's a distant goal and seek out a good used deal in your more immediate future.

You need some speed, some feeling of accomplishment by getting faster and going further. You need to push yourself when you ride and I think a lot will change when you get a proper bike. It does not have to be new, fancy or expensive. Just work with whatever your immediate or near-term budget will allow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I would say that a 2.2 mile ride one way will not be enough riding to see some results in your conditioning or your weight. Slowly build up to more challenging rides and fitness, weight reduction and equipment will happen for you. Remember it's a lifetime activity.
I should clarify. 2.2 is one way. I'm up to two round trips, or 8.8 miles, plus about 1/3 mile each way, there and back. usually a pretty stiff wind one way so I go even slower. but i'm usually riding about an hour.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
food for me is an addiction. not quite as strong as smoking was as that took me 35 years to quit but I LOVE to cook and I LOVE to eat even more. as far as my bike goes, it's for sale right now. soon as it sells I should be able to pull the trigger on my new bikesdirect.com wide tire, single speed road bike. I actually just sold a single speed road bike but it had 23s. at my weight I need a much wider tire. yes it's true, I cant really push it on a dirt geared SS mtn because I can only spin so fast before I start to bounce in the saddle. hopefully i'll be able to dump this bike soon and pick up what I believe will be my new "everything" bike.
 

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food for me is an addiction. not quite as strong as smoking was as that took me 35 years to quit but I LOVE to cook and I LOVE to eat even more. as far as my bike goes, it's for sale right now. soon as it sells I should be able to pull the trigger on my new bikesdirect.com wide tire, single speed road bike. I actually just sold a single speed road bike but it had 23s. at my weight I need a much wider tire. yes it's true, I cant really push it on a dirt geared SS mtn because I can only spin so fast before I start to bounce in the saddle. hopefully i'll be able to dump this bike soon and pick up what I believe will be my new "everything" bike.
OK, let me be blunt. Food is technically an addiction for everything on the planet. We need food. You are eating way too much of it. It isn't an addiction it is an inability to regulate your consumption. You have zero data from what I can tell? You haven't a clue what you put in your mouth. Riding a bicycle a mile or two is going to magically transform your complete lack of self regulation into a weight loss scenario? Trust me here... Take the bike out completely. It is irrelevant. Just eat less calories, make those goals. Any time on the bike is a bonus. As little as you are riding, that's a generous plan.
 

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You say that you're 80lbs overweight diabetic who loves to eat and isn't motivated to exercise, so my 1st question is what was your last A1c? Are you below 7 as is recommended? Are you close to 7?

My A1c numbers are in the mid 6's and it is damned hard to keep them there so I expect yours, at 80lbs overweight are probably closer to 8, possibly higher. I could be wrong, but your A1c is what you need to be concerned about, and that concern is what you need to use to motivate you to watch your diet and get your exercise.

You can't let a work schedule get in the way. You need to take charge, you need to make changes and you need to manage your diabetes and blood pressure. Or you can just live with kidney failure, vision issues, amputation and all the rest of the health issues that you may be inviting into your life.

Living with diabetes ain't easy, but it's doable.
 

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OP, I've been where you are.

In may of 2014, at 51 years old, I was over 300lbs, my A1C was off the charts high, I had HBP, high cholesterol, and numerous other conditions mostly related to my poor choices.

An annual visit to my eye doctor was the jolt I needed. He reported that I had early signs of macular degeneration in both eyes. This condition is directly correlated to my uncontrolled blood glucose levels.

I decided to do something about it. Mostly get my ass up off the couch and get more active. I started walking, as far as I could as often as I could. I parked at the far end of the parking lot. I took the stairs instead of the elevator. I walked to lunch (instead of driving), and ate better (fewer calories, higher nutrition density). Almost immediately I started seeing results. Just moving around more I started feeling better, sleeping better, having more energy, etc... Just the positive results were self inspiring to a degree. I lost some weight, but not nearly enough.

After about two months, it got to the point where walking wasn't going to work. I was walking three to five miles a day, and at some point, that's just too time consuming, so I started looking for alternatives. I made a small effort to try jogging, but still being close to 300lbs, having serious lower back and hip issues, there was no way that was going to be a long term solution.

Having done a lot of cycling in my late teens and early twenties (I didn't even own a car until I was 22 years old), I decided to try getting a bike. At that time I knew very little to nothing about the current bike market, and just started going to bike shops and asking lots of questions. I had set my budget at $1000, knowing that it might not work out. I ended up on an aluminum bike, that while rideable, was terribly uncomfortable for more than 20 or 30 minutes. So I did what I could. I'd take short, but frequent rides. After a few weeks, the seat pain started subsiding, the legs were less sore. I got myself some shorts and shoes, and eventually worked my way up to riding for an hour or more. That turned into two hours, and three, and eventually much longer rides. I treated myself to a new fancy endurance geometry carbon bike, and loved it so much. It got to the point where riding was really all I wanted to do. It still is. It's actually become a bit of a problem, although losing daylight, and warm weather, will probably slow me down some.

Strava has something called a 'Fitness and Freshness' graph. I believe it's only available to premium. I've logged all of my rides in Strava since I started riding again. The fitness and freshness thing is not something I've ever really paid much attention to, until I realized how well it demonstrates how far I've come. Looking at it amazes me. When I consider where I was, and compare it to now, its nearly 180 degree turnaround. My health and fitness are as good or better than they have been since I was in my 20's. My A1C is below 6 without any medication, my weight is under control at 240lbs (6' 5" tall). I still have a little ways to go (goal weight is 220, but I'm not in a huge hurry to get there). My resting pulse is 55, my FTP is 275 (measured over a 1hr actual ride). My Doctor is astonished. Considering where I was, and where I was headed, he could not be more pleased.

Here is an annotated screenshot of the Strava graph I mentioned.



Why am I showing and telling you all of this?

Well, you said you are looking for motivation. I'm presenting you an example of what can happen.

There is one *very* important factor. If you are going to turn your health and life around, and do it around a base of riding a bicycle, you are going to have to fall in love with riding. Just like dieting, or any other exercise program. If you can't find a way to be happy with cycling as a significant part of your life, it's not going to work.

Don't do it because you have to. Do it because you want to.

For me, that meant finding a bike (or three) that I loved. Finding places to ride that were relatively safe, especially after being hit by the Red Prius of Doom last summer. I started riding gravel/adventure stuff. Fire roads, rail trails, local MUT's.. anything and everything, as often as I could for as long as I could. I've spent a *lot* of money on bikes and bike related stuff. It has been worth *every penny*. But that said, living a healthy lifestyle doesn't have to cost money. You need a bike you love. Comfort and fit are FAR more important than anything else. It doesn't take expensive carbon wheels, or even an expensive (or otherwise) carbon frame. A nice voluminous tire, and wide profile rim with a healthy number of spokes, and riding position you can be comfortable in for long periods of time... that's the most important stuff.

What worked for me may be very different for you. I could never live with a single speed. I get frustrated with 22 at times (mostly in the high end). In fact I modified my gravel bike to take a mountain bike rear cassette so I could get up some of the steep mountain roads around here (Western Washington).

Figure out what works for you. Hopefully it will become a passion.

Good luck in finding what you are looking for. I can only hope you (and anyone else in the same or similar situation) can find similar success.

PM me if you have any questions.
 
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