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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have one of the following:

1. Motobecane Cafe Century
2. Motobecane Cafe Century Pro
3. Motobecane Cafe Century Pro DX

I'm thinking about getting the Motobecane Cafe Century Pro DX as it looks like a good value for what you get, but there is just not enough info on this bike and I would like some opinions from people who own it (although opinions from those who have not own these bikes are also welcomed).

Some Features of this bike:

1. Motobecane Cafe Century
--- 9 speed
--- 11-32T cassette (SRAM)
2. Motobecane Cafe Century Pro
--- 10 speed shimano 105 group
--- 11-28T cassette (SHIMANO)
3. Motobecane Cafe Century Pro DX
--- 10 speed shimano 105 group
--- 12-30T cassette (SHIMANO)
--- hydraulic disc brakes

These models has a triple (50x39x30) which is great for hill climbs, but it seems that I get the best granny gear with #1 (base model) since we're down to a 30x32. With the PRO DX we're only down to a 30x30. In anycase, it's better than what I current am running (11-28T cassette on a double 50x34 - so my lowest gear is a 34x28).

As you can see I'm focused more on hill climbs :).

One guy told me to look at the Specialized Sirrus Elite Carbon Disc:
Specialized Bicycle Components

Of course I rather be sporting a Specialized than a Motobecane logo, but I'm at the age that I don't care anymore (I've mechanically inclined - more so than the average Joe) so I don't need as much support from a bike mechanic, if at all.

More info on the bike can be found at:

1. Motobecane Cafe Century

Save up to 60% off new Hybrid Bicycles | Road Bikes Cafe Century PRO

2. Motobecane Cafe Century Pro

Save up to 60% off new Hybrid Carbon Bicycles | Road Bikes Cafe Century PRO

3. Motobecane Cafe Century Pro DX
Save up to 60% off new Carbon Hybrid Bicycles | Road Bikes Cafe Century PRO DX

Thanks in advance for your input,
Gary
 

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Gary - what do you intend to use the bike for? These are not "CX" bikes in the traditional sense, so trying to get more context.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Gary - what do you intend to use the bike for? These are not "CX" bikes in the traditional sense, so trying to get more context.
Main use is hill climbs on and off road. I'm not looking to do anything technical. I have a full suspension bike for that.

Thanks!
Gary
 

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Off-road hill climbs I'd probably want fatter tires, which it looks like you have room for. The down-side for me personally would be that they are flat-bar. Especially for climbing I'd rather have the leverage and hand position options of a drop-bar. But that is me.

The bikes just look cobbled together (frankenbike) together to me. At that price range you might do better with a used bike. But if they serve your needs, BD has a decent reputation.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Off-road hill climbs I'd probably want fatter tires, which it looks like you have room for. The down-side for me personally would be that they are flat-bar. Especially for climbing I'd rather have the leverage and hand position options of a drop-bar. But that is me.

The bikes just look cobbled together (frankenbike) together to me. At that price range you might do better with a used bike. But if they serve your needs, BD has a decent reputation.
Thanks for the feedback. I am always on the top bar of my drop bar when I'm climbing (in both sitting and standing position). I think I"m only on the drop when I'm going fast downhill or when I'm switching gears and/or braking.

The one reservation I have with a carbon bike is that if I crash it a certain way (or even drop it a certain way), I may have to get a new frame. If the frame was aluminum or steel I might crash and ride away if I physically am able to.

How does the bike look cobbled together? It looks nice to me except that big motobecane logo.

Gary
 

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Thanks for the feedback. I am always on the top bar of my drop bar when I'm climbing (in both sitting and standing position). I think I"m only on the drop when I'm going fast downhill or when I'm switching gears and/or braking.

The one reservation I have with a carbon bike is that if I crash it a certain way (or even drop it a certain way), I may have to get a new frame. If the frame was aluminum or steel I might crash and ride away if I physically am able to.

How does the bike look cobbled together? It looks nice to me except that big motobecane logo.

Gary
Yes, carbon can be fragile, but I highly doubt the carbon frame in this spec is on par with the ultralightweight frames. So I'd suspect durability might be less of a concern. If the material is a concern, go metal. I doubt you'd be giving up much weight.

As for my cobbled together comment. To me it just looks like they took a road bike frame, added some canti bosses on and slapped a somewhat unique group of parts on it. I look at it and ask myself "what does this bike do well?" That isn't to say it won't serve your needs. It very well might. But to me it is a flag of caution.
 
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