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Hi,

I've been riding MTB for a couple of years, but my docter tells me to stop, if I want to get rid of my cronic back/neck/headpain, so I guess he is right..

I'm about to trade my new $3000 mountainbike in for a similar roadbike, and I'm looking forward to try this totaly different way of cycling.

Can anyone give me a weblink where I can read a little about training (how to do it, how often to do it and how long to do it).

Any other things to worry about?
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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Hmmmm. I'm not a doc, don't play one on TV, but if you really have chronic pain related to the MTB, before dropping huge coin on a road bike seems like you'll want to be sure that it really alleviates your problem. If jarring is the problem, you may want to consider a setup that is more foregiving... longer stays, bigger tires. If it is the riding position that aggravates your condition, you may want to look at bikes that are more upright.

As for good training/riding advice, nothing beats riding with a good cycling club (IMO). If you're a loner by nature, there are a number of excellent books, including at your LBS, and lots of good info for the newbie in Bicycling Magazine.
 

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If neck/back problems are related to position more than to shocks from offroad conditions maybe the Rivendell philosophy of rider position is a good place to start. Riding "aero" with a high seat relative to the bars is quite hard on the upper back. IMO the major difference is long rides are longer with a lower HR than in MTB training. Ride long and slow, fast and short.
 

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2nd the Rivendell motion--worked wonders for me.

plodderslusk said:
If neck/back problems are related to position more than to shocks from offroad conditions maybe the Rivendell philosophy of rider position is a good place to start. Riding "aero" with a high seat relative to the bars is quite hard on the upper back. IMO the major difference is long rides are longer with a lower HR than in MTB training. Ride long and slow, fast and short.
I've mentioned this too many times here to do it again, but you can find an explanation of Rivendell's idea of bike fit at www.rivbike.com. Look under Cycling 101 or something like that--can't remember offhand. I'm not kidding, though--my first ride on my Atlantis was more comfortable than I've been on any bike in almost 30 years of adult cycling.
 
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