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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a flat before a ride. That was fortuitous. I suspected difficulty and got it. Obviously I still run tubes and wanted to swap out the older original tube anyway.
A flat on a ride would have been doable but time consuming.

So I watched some videos, the Park tool one was pretty good and some dude from a bike shop somewhere.

Between the two I learned some great technique. I went so far as to swap to some thinner rim tape with strapping tape as a backup.

The random shop guy talked about massaging the tire. That worked great.

So if I get a flat on a ride, I feel confident I can do a tube swap quickly and avoid a walk/call for a ride of shame home.
 

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Some tire/rim combos are just nearly impossible to mount/dismount as in impossible without a bead jack - and not the small portable plastic one either! Needless to say, I tried different tires on those rims and problem solved.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
This is bike shop guy massaging a tire that works really well.

I thought this was a Park video. Nope. GCN. Video good for some extra ideas.

I have a plastic bead jack. Judicious use is good. May be the only way, Lombard is in that arena with his. Be careful on delicate rims. I’m a fraidy-cat, so if my plastic bead jack is overwhelmed, I rethink my process.
 

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This is bike shop guy massaging a tire that works really well.


I thought this was a Park video. Nope. GCN. Video good for some extra ideas.
Those are both good videos. I've never had a tire I couldn't get on (tubed or tubeless) using the massage and working the slack to the top technique. Granted, when I'm home, I just grab my tire bead jack.

I had to laugh at the Allrounder Bicycles video.
Q: Why do people like to line up the label with the valve stem?
A: You know what, I think it's a tradition that serves no real use or purpose. .... but.... I find it useful cause if you get a flat it helps you find the hole in the tube.

:ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: That's exactly the real use or purpose!!
 

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I don't think you quite understand. The tire combo I dealt with I couldn't even get the bead out of the groove except with the heavy bead jack, and even then, it wasn't exactly easy. I honestly contemplated using power tools! This was a combo of a WTB KOM rim and a WTB Byway tire. I ditched the WTB Byways and put on Panaracer Gravel Kings. Problem solved!
 
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Did any of these video gurus mention talc baby powder? Smear it all over the very slightly inflated tube, and that thing will slide right into the tire evenly without sticking. The talc on the tube gets on the tire bead and the whole thing slides right into the rim. One expert actually said talc lets the tube settle evenly around the tire as you ride and distorts smoothly along the flat spot, therefore decreases rolling resistance. How about that?

Rule #1: Use the hands. Plastic tire tools break under pressure, and aluminum tire tools nick up the rim bead sooner or later. Knead the tire over the rim with the heels of the hands, bit by bit from the edges. If the final two inches won't fall into place, smear some more talc on it. A real PITA, but I can tell ya, dealing with tight tires at the shop for more years than I would like to admit, it always worked. I never had to resort to a tire tool.

Have to agree, many times changing a flat, had nasty thoughts about oversized rims and/or undersized tire beads [usually kevlar folding tires]. About like dropouts that don't drop out, I pretty much blame the lawyers worried about tires blowing off rims at stupid high air pressures, as many riders think makes them faster.
 

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Those are both good videos. I've never had a tire I couldn't get on (tubed or tubeless) using the massage and working the slack to the top technique. Granted, when I'm home, I just grab my tire bead jack.

I had to laugh at the Allrounder Bicycles video.
Q: Why do people like to line up the label with the valve stem?
A: You know what, I think it's a tradition that serves no real use or purpose. .... but.... I find it useful cause if you get a flat it helps you find the hole in the tube.

:ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: That's exactly the real use or purpose!!
Tire label lined up on valve stem? Absolutely. Not only that, but also mount the tire with label on the drive side, the business side facing out when in the repair stand. That's how the manufacturers do it. It tells you right away what size tire you've got, recommended air pressure, and the type of valve is right there.
 

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Did any of these video gurus mention talc baby powder?
Yes. Watch the video.

Rule #1: Use the hands. Plastic tire tools break under pressure
Are you using bakelite levers from the 70's? Use a better plastic lever. I've never had one break.


Not only that, but also mount the tire with label on the drive side, the business side facing out when in the repair stand. That's how the manufacturers do it.
What cheap tires are you using with labels and tire size on just one side? All my tires are printed on both sides... even my trainer tires.

It tells you right away what size tire you've got, recommended air pressure,
No no no no no no... if you're using that pressure, you're doing it wrong.

and the type of valve is right there.
Type of valve? What are you talking about.
 

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... Not only that, but also mount the tire with label on the drive side, the business side facing out when in the repair stand. That's how the manufacturers do it. It tells you right away what size tire you've got, recommended air pressure, and the type of valve is right there.
Most tires have a direction-of-rotation arrow. That's what dictates the installation, not some label. But it's good practice to align the label with the stem. If you get a mysterious flat, you can locate the spot on the tire that corresponds to the hole in the tube and find the cause, which is often an embedded sharp object.
 

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About like dropouts that don't drop out, I pretty much blame the lawyers worried about tires blowing off rims at stupid high air pressures, as many riders think makes them faster.
Huh??? Mounting and dismounting difficulties didn't really become an issue until tubeless compatible rims and tires. A tight fit is necessary if you are running tubeless. WTF does this have to do with lawyers?

What are you talking about.
I surely would like to know.
 

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Most tires have a direction-of-rotation arrow. That's what dictates the installation, not some label.
Tire tread and directional arrows are just marketing. They mean nothing to bicycle performance.


At one point Schwalbe had switched to a slick tread. Then switched back to treads simply because customers are ignorant and they got tired of explaining over and over.

Tubeless Goes Pro: Schwalbe Pro One Tubeless - Peloton Magazine
The tire has a new tread pattern in place of the previously slick One. As we have heard from many tire manufacturers tread adds zero performance. It does not increase grip, does not channel water, in short it is simply for rider peace of mind. Schwalbe got tired of explaining to pros and amateurs alike that a slick tire created as much, if not more, traction in all situations so they added some purely cosmetic tread.


The importance of tread pattern on cycle tyres.
Yes you read that correctly. 90%+ of the tyres sold to us cycle tourists have utterly useless and counterproductive tread moulded into them.

So why do 90% of bike tyres still have tread?
Marketing... It's a simple answer and the only explanation. 100 years ago bike tyres were slick, but to distinguish between makes manufacturers began adding light tread as their 'signature'. By manipulating the ignorance of the public they could make the buyer thing – 'wow! Look at the tread on that tyre – must be really grippy!' That this madness extends to even the thinnest of race tyres says a lot...

It also gives a manufacturer an easy way of making a whole range of tyres all aimed at different markets and price points by the simple expedient of using the same carcass and a bucketful of moulds of different patterns.


schwalbe.com
Why are so many treads direction dependant?
In the case of a road tire the rolling direction is mainly important for aesthetic considerations. Tires marked with arrows simply look more dynamic.
Off road, the rolling direction is far more important
 

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That's not true. There's lots of tight tire mounting threads here on RBR looong before the existence of tubeless.
Hmmm. I can't say I have noticed it anywhere near as commonly as after the existence of tubeless. I had problems mounting a friend's Michelin tires once before tubeless. Beyond that, tires generally fit much easier back then.
 
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Hmmm. I can't say I have noticed it anywhere near as commonly as after the existence of tubeless. I had problems mounting a friend's Michelin tires once before tubeless. Beyond that, tires generally fit much easier back then.
Road tubeless were first introduced in 2006. And started getting more mainstream around 2010.

A pre-2007 "tight tire" search comes up with pages and pages of results. Search for other things like "tire mounting problems" "difficult tires" etc etc and there's pages and pages more.

Tight rim/tire combos have always been a problem. Bear in mind also, there use to be just a few manufactures of (alum) rims. In recent years there's hundreds more manufacturers, especially with carbon. Coupled with no real tire/rim standard and you have a clusterf#ck, tubed or tubeless.
The new ERTO standard came out in 2020. I think as more manufacturers follow it you'll start to see an improvement.
 

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Road tubeless were first introduced in 2006. And started getting more mainstream around 2010.

A pre-2007 "tight tire" search comes up with pages and pages of results. Search for other things like "tire mounting problems" "difficult tires" etc etc and there's pages and pages more.

Tight rim/tire combos have always been a problem. Bear in mind also, there use to be just a few manufactures of (alum) rims. In recent years there's hundreds more manufacturers, especially with carbon. Coupled with no real tire/rim standard and you have a clusterf#ck, tubed or tubeless.
The new ERTO standard came out in 2020. I think as more manufacturers follow it you'll start to see an improvement.
Well I have to claim ignorance about mounting issues with carbon rims since I don't use them. My experience is mostly with aluminum alloy rims. If you're talking about any experience with steel rims, you have to go back to my teenage years.

There is definitely a trick to mounting tubeless compatible rims and once you learn it, you wonder what all the fuss was about. It's still a tighter fit than on non-tubeless rim-tire combos in general, though exceptions exist.
 

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massaging a tire that works really well
Worked really well in that video which didn't look like a difficult tire, at least compared to Continental Grand Prix TT tire. I tried that massaging method and finally mounted it but paid a price with a blister on my palm just before riding. :mad:
 

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I like to invent and shout new curse words, so all the neighbor kids can pick them up and share them with their friends. It doesn’t actually help, but it’s fun when parent come over to scold me for teaching their kids pseudo-cruse word.
 

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Those are both good videos. I've never had a tire I couldn't get on (tubed or tubeless) using the massage and working the slack to the top technique. Granted, when I'm home, I just grab my tire bead jack.

I had to laugh at the Allrounder Bicycles video.
Q: Why do people like to line up the label with the valve stem?
A: You know what, I think it's a tradition that serves no real use or purpose. .... but.... I find it useful cause if you get a flat it helps you find the hole in the tube.

:ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: That's exactly the real use or purpose!!
I do this because some (not all) tires list their specs such as psi around the white label. Not that I check the tire specs every time I pump the damn tire, but it's convenient to know where to go
 
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