Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
11,561 Posts
Liggett hits a homerun with this one, “It should never have been allowed to get this far. The UCI started it and it could be the ASO that’s going to finish it.”

It was nice to see him talking some sense about the doping issue. I usually find him to be very much an apologist when he's commentating on TV.

I wonder what Carmichael thinks of the dangers involved in sports from stuff like turning your kids over to the supervision of people who do stuff like taking them to far off places and having them injected with drugs :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,671 Posts
the UCI should learn a few basic of public relations. Instead of hurting the sport by acting like every violation is a sign of the apocalypse, they should be holding cycling up as about the only sport that is trying to seriously deal with doping in sports. Every other pro sport I can think of still basically has their head in the sand - baseball has attracted attention only because congress got involved. Sean Merriman tests positive, gets a 4 game suspension, and is voted to the frickin pro bowl. There's an epidemic of kids juicing up in the US so they can bulk up in hopes of making it in the major pro sports, and everyone is acting like a guy taking a t-patch is the worst person in the world (which probably had no effect on his performance, who also passed 7 other tests during the tour).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,342 Posts
Dwayne Barry said:
I wonder what Carmichael thinks of the dangers involved in sports from stuff like turning your kids over to the supervision of people who do stuff like taking them to far off places and having them injected with drugs :)
He's totally fine with injecting juniors with "exract of cortisone" in Spokane, WA. So, I'd speculate that he'd be pretty much okay with it elsewhere.:)
 

· Cannot bench own weight
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
I bet a lot of these "doctors" or "trainers" who are involved in doping actually think (and maybe they're right), that what they do is safe and beneficial. I would not be surprised if they were ok with their kids following that same path. Especially when it comes to things like Testosterone and HGH, maybe even a little EPO.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
11,561 Posts
Einstruzende said:
I bet a lot of these "doctors" or "trainers" who are involved in doping actually think (and maybe they're right), that what they do is safe and beneficial. I would not be surprised if they were ok with their kids following that same path. Especially when it comes to things like Testosterone and HGH, maybe even a little EPO.
Perhaps, but it is unforgiveable when you're put in a position to supervise someone else's kids and you have them injected with anything, whether it's B12 or "extract of cortisone" or whatever. It's not only unforgiveable, it's criminal.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,342 Posts
Einstruzende said:
I bet a lot of these "doctors" or "trainers" who are involved in doping actually think (and maybe they're right), that what they do is safe and beneficial. I would not be surprised if they were ok with their kids following that same path. Especially when it comes to things like Testosterone and HGH, maybe even a little EPO.
Ferarri seems to. his comment equating EPO use with drinking orange juice made clear at least how he wants to be perceived as viewing the risks of doping.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,671 Posts
I guess OJ in Italy must carry a warning like this one for procrit:

WARNINGS: INCREASED MORTALITY, SERIOUS CARDIOVASCULAR AND THROMBOEMBOLIC EVENTS, AND TUMOR PROGRESSION

Renal failure: Patients experienced greater risks for death and serious cardiovascular events when administered erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) to target higher versus lower hemoglobin levels (13.5 vs. 11.3 g/dL; 14 vs. 10 g/dL) in two clinical studies. Individualize dosing to achieve and maintain hemoglobin levels within the range of 10 to 12 g/dL.
* ESAs shortened overall survival and/or time-to-tumor progression in clinical studies in patients with breast, non-small cell lung, head and neck, lymphoid, and cervical cancers when dosed to target a hemoglobin of ≥ 12 g/dL.
* The risks of shortened survival and tumor progression have not been excluded when ESAs are dosed to target a hemoglobin of < 12 g/dL.
* To minimize these risks, as well as the risk of serious cardio- and thrombovascular events, use the lowest dose needed to avoid red blood cell transfusions.
* Use only for treatment of anemia due to concomitant myelosuppressive chemotherapy.
* Discontinue following the completion of a chemotherapy course.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top