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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know of a manufactured or homebrew solution to get a multi-speed (e.g. at least 3 different speeds, hopefully significantly different) fixed gear working?

I was thinking about this the other day, as I really like my current fixt for a training bike but would like to have an easily (e.g. on the fly, like shifting, NOT a flipflop hub) changeable gear to run on it. I really like the different feel of climbing on a fixt.. that is, when I'm not ridiculously overgeared. (I run a 44x15)

Not knowing about how something like a Nexxus hub works, I thought maybe one of those could be rigged to do this. If the hub had to be used with brakes, I guess it wouldn't matter to me since I already desecrate my road fixie with a front brake and a lever set, since I like riding on the hoods like most roadies. My significant other (who got me into fixt riding) found a hub produced by Sturmey-Archer in the 60's that did basically this, but it seems nothing exists like that anymore. She said maybe start a letter writing campaign, which I've now done by emailing Sturmey-Archer (or whoever owns them and has contact info listed on the webpage) asking them if the thing exists, where I could find one or if it could be brought back into production.

Am I the only one who has thought this would be cool? Surely not...
 

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how's 2

don't know about a 3 speed fixie, but theres an <a href="http://63xc.com/genng/bikesmith.htm">article</a> on 63xc.com regarding a bendix fixed 2 speed hub and how to build one. I think I've seen a SRAM internally geared hub converted to a multigeared fixed hub but I don't have a link for that, if it even exists.
 

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One is enough

A couple years ago I was thinking the very same thing, but I've come around to settling on the fundamental simplicity of a fixed gear ride... one speed. I run 44/17, which I can ride for over 100 miles, over 3000' climbs (and descents) or 5000'+ of cumulative climbing, 12%-14% grades (with spikes to 18%or more). I used to think an easier "climbing" gear would be good to have, but I'm now quite content with my current gearing.

To translate all of this to a concise contrarian reply, I'd say that if you want multiple fixed gears you probably don't have the correct fixed gear now. Try a new gear ratio or two and I bet that your interest in vintage S-A wanes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
PdxMark said:
A couple years ago I was thinking the very same thing, but I've come around to settling on the fundamental simplicity of a fixed gear ride... one speed. I run 44/17, which I can ride for over 100 miles, over 3000' climbs (and descents) or 5000'+ of cumulative climbing, 12%-14% grades (with spikes to 18%or more). I used to think an easier "climbing" gear would be good to have, but I'm now quite content with my current gearing.

To translate all of this to a concise contrarian reply, I'd say that if you want multiple fixed gears you probably don't have the correct fixed gear now. Try a new gear ratio or two and I bet that your interest in vintage S-A wanes.
This kind of feedback really wasn't what I was asking for, but thanks anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wow. This is perfect. I emailed the guys at that shop that creates the 2FG to see what pricing is on it. 30% is a huge difference - but it may be worth it.

I sat down and calculated what the gear would feel like if I ran the "high" gear similar to what I have now and what the "low" would feel like. 44x15 = 77.1 inches, with an 18t cog, you'd need a 53 to approximate that (77.4 inches). With a 53, the low gear would be (by their published 30% lower formula), approx. 54.18 inches, aka 39x19 (53.9 inches). Seems about perfect. 39x19 is a great low-speed, high cadence recovery type gear, and will suffice quite well for the 1 to 1.5k climbs around here.

With a 30% difference though, it's a tough call - do I make my "high" gear typical or the "low" gear typical? Meaning, do I make the High ratio lower or the low ratio higher? who knows. I'd probably have to keep a few different chainrings around.

Thanks for the great info!!
 

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SickBoy said:
This kind of feedback really wasn't what I was asking for, but thanks anyway.
Ok, how about this? You can weld up the freehub body on a cassette hub, run two well spaced cogs back there, run two similarly spaced chainrings, and manually change between two ratios. Or if you don't mind cross chaining a bit you can have four ratios. Or add a derailer to each end and unweld the cassette and change on the fly. But that's not fixed. Or you could look at Sheldon's site. Sigh.

Seriously, though. I'm sure I've seen internally geared hubs with cassette freehubs. Are the internals set up fixed? If so that would be an easy route, just weld up the freehub. Not that I'd advocate going to all that trouble just to shift gears...
 
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