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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We bought our bikes at the same time. They have the same wheels, same tires, we run the same pressure, and she never rides without me. She's gotten 3 flats (in 150 miles) and I've had zero (in 400 miles). The only difference is that her bike is the female equivalent of mine and I weigh about 2.5x what she does.

Should I explore going tubeless?

As far as I can tell they are puncture flats. The first one had a hole I could find, the second one I pumped up until there was so much pressure the tube popped and I never found the hole, and I just found out about the 3rd--haven't changed it yet.
 

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We bought our bikes at the same time. They have the same wheels, same tires, we run the same pressure, and she never rides without me. She's gotten 3 flats (in 150 miles) and I've had zero (in 400 miles). The only difference is that her bike is the female equivalent of mine and I weigh about 2.5x what she does.

Should I explore going tubeless?

As far as I can tell they are puncture flats. The first one had a hole I could find, the second one I pumped up until there was so much pressure the tube popped and I never found the hole, and I just found out about the 3rd--haven't changed it yet.
It could just be coincidence. You can put slime in a tube so tubeless is really not the issue. Until you know the source of the leaks, you don't know anything. The tube you blew up until it popped you should have just pumped it up until it was about double its size and then held it under water and looked for bubbles.

The way to find the source of the leaks is to align the tube with the tire once you have found the hole in the tube. This should lead you to the spot on the tire where there is probably a bit of wire or glass imbedded in the tire. This is the reason to mount tires with the label at the valve stem hole - you can always line up the leak point on the tube easily (or at least two possible points if you didn't keep track of how the tube was installed).
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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whoooahhhhhh...if you weigh 2.5x what she does why on earth are you using the same pressure? think about that for a minute...does it make any sense at all? how much do you both weigh?
 

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"The first one had a hole I could find, the second one I pumped up until there was so much pressure the tube popped and I never found the hole, and I just found out about the 3rd--haven't changed it yet."

Not real clear on your description of #2 and #3 but but it's sounding like the first one was something you hit (routine flat, can't really be avoided) and the second two were something you screwed up fixing it.
Make sure you inspect the tire for glass or whatever still getting to the inside. Check the rim. And be very careful not to pinch the tube between the bead and the rim. That can be easy to do without knowing it. If you coat the tubes with baby power that makes it a little easier to avoid.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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They're just both at 100psi... She's 110 and I'm 250. Close to 2.5x anyway...
ok...you should be on bigger tires, 25mm at least. she should be using lower pressure, more like 70ish front & 80ish rear. for real. like i said, think about it for a minute and you'll see it makes no sense at all for you both to be on the same tire at the same pressure.

as for why she's getting flats, it shouldn't be too hard to figure it out. if they're punctures coming through the tire, then she's running over stuff on the road. when you ride together is she on your right, closer to the gutter, and you closer to the road? if she rides in the gutter there is a much greater chance of running over debris that can cause punctures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ok...you should be on bigger tires, 25mm at least. she should be using lower pressure, more like 70ish front & 80ish rear. for real. like i said, think about it for a minute and you'll see it makes no sense at all for you both to be on the same tire at the same pressure.

as for why she's getting flats, it shouldn't be too hard to figure it out. if they're punctures coming through the tire, then she's running over stuff on the road. when you ride together is she on your right, closer to the gutter, and you closer to the road? if she rides in the gutter there is a much greater chance of running over debris that can cause punctures.
The way I thought about the pressure was put it at the highest the tire can handle. For me, I NEED the pressure to be that high to avoid pinch flats, for her it just creates less rolling resistance. I get what you're saying but I doubt she's getting flats because the pressure is too high when mine is at the same level and I'm putting more strain on it.
 

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The way I thought about the pressure was put it at the highest the tire can handle. For me, I NEED the pressure to be that high to avoid pinch flats, for her it just creates less rolling resistance. I get what you're saying but I doubt she's getting flats because the pressure is too high when mine is at the same level and I'm putting more strain on it.
I think she is getting flats because of where she is riding on the road. There is more debris closer to the edge. If she is riding there, it is likely the cause. It isn't the equipment or tire pressure causing her flats, simply bad luck and the line she is riding on the road/bike path.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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The way I thought about the pressure was put it at the highest the tire can handle. For me, I NEED the pressure to be that high to avoid pinch flats, for her it just creates less rolling resistance. I get what you're saying but I doubt she's getting flats because the pressure is too high when mine is at the same level and I'm putting more strain on it.
you are greatly confused about tire pressure. NO ONE should actually run the 'max pressure' printed on the side of the tire. this is one of the most posted about subjects on the forum and you could use the search function and find tons of reading material.

basically, high tire pressure will get you a few things...
crap ride quality
decreased cornering traction
increased (yes, increased) rolling resistance
faster wear of the tread

soooooo...a 250lb rider should be on a 25 or 28mm tire at around 100psi rear and between 80-90psi front. this is of course dependent on the road conditions you're riding on.
a 110lb rider on 23mm tires should be using around 80psi rear and 70psi front. this will give her a much nicer ride, much improved corning traction and slightly less rolling resistance.
the big factors here are ride quality and traction. rolling resistance will be less, but it's really a non factor. the tire is the ONLY suspension on a road bike. the tire casing must have some give and be able to flex or you're riding around on a rubber covered concrete donut. the added bonus is that by lowering pressure to proper levels your tires will last somewhat longer because you're not concentrating the wear on the very center of the tire.
before you dismiss me as some crackhead that has no clue, do some research. a hard tire 'feels' fast because you feel every imperfection in the pavement. for you to feel those imperfections the bike must be moving up and down. if it's moving up and down it's not going forward. that right there defines 'rolling resistance'.
the best thing is making these changes is free and easy. if you try it and for some strange reason don't like it, you can change it back in a couple of minutes.
 

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I know when my wife started riding she would get a ton of flats. I finally figured out that she just wasn't paying attention to where or what she rode through. She would stay way over on the shoulder and ride through all the debris that's on the edges. I had to gently coach her to ride more toward the painted line in the road. This has greatly decreased her flats. One positive thing is that she now knows how to change a tube and I never worry about her getting stranded somewhere when she rides without me :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
you are greatly confused about tire pressure. NO ONE should actually run the 'max pressure' printed on the side of the tire. this is one of the most posted about subjects on the forum and you could use the search function and find tons of reading material.

basically, high tire pressure will get you a few things...
crap ride quality
decreased cornering traction
increased (yes, increased) rolling resistance
faster wear of the tread

soooooo...a 250lb rider should be on a 25 or 28mm tire at around 100psi rear and between 80-90psi front. this is of course dependent on the road conditions you're riding on.
a 110lb rider on 23mm tires should be using around 80psi rear and 70psi front. this will give her a much nicer ride, much improved corning traction and slightly less rolling resistance.
the big factors here are ride quality and traction. rolling resistance will be less, but it's really a non factor. the tire is the ONLY suspension on a road bike. the tire casing must have some give and be able to flex or you're riding around on a rubber covered concrete donut. the added bonus is that by lowering pressure to proper levels your tires will last somewhat longer because you're not concentrating the wear on the very center of the tire.
before you dismiss me as some crackhead that has no clue, do some research. a hard tire 'feels' fast because you feel every imperfection in the pavement. for you to feel those imperfections the bike must be moving up and down. if it's moving up and down it's not going forward. that right there defines 'rolling resistance'.
the best thing is making these changes is free and easy. if you try it and for some strange reason don't like it, you can change it back in a couple of minutes.
And you're greatly confused about the purpose of this thread.

My gf is getting flats and it isn't because her pressure is too high. The rest of your information will be noted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I know when my wife started riding she would get a ton of flats. I finally figured out that she just wasn't paying attention to where or what she rode through. She would stay way over on the shoulder and ride through all the debris that's on the edges. I had to gently coach her to ride more toward the painted line in the road. This has greatly decreased her flats. One positive thing is that she now knows how to change a tube and I never worry about her getting stranded somewhere when she rides without me :)
We ride tandem, which is why I'm surprised she is getting more flats than me. She isn't riding in a "dirtier" part of the road.
 

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And you're greatly confused about the purpose of this thread.

My gf is getting flats and it isn't because her pressure is too high. The rest of your information will be noted.
cxwrench gave you some straight up good advice.

You asked what you should do and everything that he told you will help in the avoidance of flats.

What's with the attitude?
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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We ride tandem, which is why I'm surprised she is getting more flats than me. She isn't riding in a "dirtier" part of the road.
despite the fact that i gave you a bunch of good (and apparently needed info) and you came back w/ attitude, i'll try again.
sounds like you have inflated the punctured tubes to find out exactly where the hole is. most people don't even get this far... this will greatly narrow down the area of the tire you need to look closely at for debris. OR, it may show you that punctures aren't the problem at all and you have a problem w/ her rim strip.
since you've done that and found a couple of punctures, i'm gonna go w/ bad luck. if she is riding behind or in front of you, rather than further to right...it's sounding like a case of 'sh*t happens'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
despite the fact that i gave you a bunch of good (and apparently needed info) and you came back w/ attitude, i'll try again.
sounds like you have inflated the punctured tubes to find out exactly where the hole is. most people don't even get this far... this will greatly narrow down the area of the tire you need to look closely at for debris. OR, it may show you that punctures aren't the problem at all and you have a problem w/ her rim strip.
since you've done that and found a couple of punctures, i'm gonna go w/ bad luck. if she is riding behind or in front of you, rather than further to right...it's sounding like a case of 'sh*t happens'.
Dunno, our LBS suggested 100psi for our bikes.

Do you have any suggests for how to get to exactly 80, 90, 100, or whatever the "perfect" pressure is? Because an inconsistent amount is lost every time you disconnect the pump so I might pump it to 100, but it'll really be 85-95 depending on how much is lost when disconnecting the pump. Unless I'm doing it wrong or have a crappy pump...

I'll try her at 80 the next time we ride.
 

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Dunno, our LBS suggested 100psi for our bikes. I'm not even sure how much effort it's worth trying to get to exactly 80, 90, 100, or whatever the "perfect" pressure is because an inconsistent amount is lost every time you disconnect the pump so I might pump it to 100, but it'll really be 85-95 depending on how much is lost when disconnecting the pump.

I'll try her at 80 the next time we ride.
The effort is so small you can't even quantify it. You're not losing 15 psi disconnecting the pump. The benefits of this zero effort are comfort and less flats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The effort is so small you can't even quantify it. You're not losing 15 psi disconnecting the pump. The benefits of this zero effort are comfort and less flats.
Would you mind explaining how running 80psi instead of 100psi would give me less flats? It seems to me that running less pressure would open me up to pinch flats.

Also, I was trying to say that I'm not even sure how much pressure is really in there by the time I disconnect the pump that it'll be hard to duplicate it for the next time if I end up liking it. I seem to also lose air (and an inconsistent amount at that) when connect it. So if I lose 5-10 when disconnecting and 5-10 connecting, I'm stacking ranges and it seems like it would be hard to duplicate the next time.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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Dunno, our LBS suggested 100psi for our bikes.

Do you have any suggests for how to get to exactly 80, 90, 100, or whatever the "perfect" pressure is? Because an inconsistent amount is lost every time you disconnect the pump so I might pump it to 100, but it'll really be 85-95 depending on how much is lost when disconnecting the pump. Unless I'm doing it wrong or have a crappy pump...

I'll try her at 80 the next time we ride.
ZERO air is lost from the tube when you disconnect the pump. the air you hear is coming from the hose of the pump. as soon as you finish the last stroke of the pump, the valve on the tube closes. done. NO air escapes from a presta valve.
get the pressure to where she likes it and it's close to what was recommended on your pump's gauge. obviously it doesn't have to be exact, just close if fine. and don't use the same pressure front/rear...more weight is on the rear tire, so that gets more pressure.
it's easily worth the effort because her tires are overinflated by at least 20%...that's big. and it's free. make the effort, she'll be impressed w/ your desire to make her ride better.
and i'd question your LBS's ability to do anything correctly if they're this clueless about something like tire pressure.
 
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