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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well here she is - apologies for the overkill on the pix, wanted to get as much detail up as I could, sadly I'm crap with a camera.

Complete apart from pedals and a seat post binder bolt which is proving hard to find - so no test ride as yet.

Nice fancy lugged A S Gillott frame built in 1950 and sent to Bob Jackson in the UK for repainting. Period correct original decals from H LLoyd in Penrith. The placing of the 531 decal to the rear of the seat tube is also correct for Gillotts of this period.

Pump pegs and b/b oil port left intact.

NOS Campagnolo Super Record seat post and pista chainset, Gran Sport Headset, Brooks Swift saddle, Phil Wood fixed/free hubs, 27" Jalco rims 32/32, 1950/60 GB alloy stem, SR alloy bars, NOS 1970 CLB long reach brakes, SRAM chain and borrowed chainring/sprocket.

I posted more detail here rather than in fixed forum as for me this is more of a retro project than a fixie one. Will be an interesting 1st ride as I last rode fixed 24 yrs ago.

Bike originally had a brazed on gear lever boss which I had removed for cleaner lines. It could be built up as a geared bike using clip on gear levers and gear hanger if I so wished, but back in the 50's fixed/free single speed was much more common than gears.

Can't wait to ride it. Hope you like.

Next project involves some NOS Campagnolo 50th Anno kit I've sourced!!:thumbsup: :p :D :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yip - it was bent big time.............

moschika said:
very beautiful. was this the one that got a little crunched? if so, you couldn't tell. nice job.
Yip, turned out ok. Just need to clearcoat the cracks in the paint to prevent rust, and if I ever find a seat post binder bolt I'll be good to go...............:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
True and I may get some...............

JP said:
Beautiful, and room for....wait for it...fenders! You need one good bike with fenders, no?
But being English I'll be forced to call 'em mug guards!:p

I'm half toying with putting fenders on it and leaving it at work for lunchtime rides around the Wellington bays. All fairly flat. Living atop a 3km gorge means it ain't much use to me at home!!

I have a habit of not really using my retro bikes, so might just use this really regulary - after all it's survived 58 years without falling apart so maybe I should get some daily miles in on it.

Good to hear from you JP.

I wanted to post pix of your Roberts' in the lust thread!!!
 

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Beautiful job!

What strikes me is the head tube and seat tube angles. Many of the fifties English and American frames seem to have slacker angles - on the order of 70°. With its moderate length chainstays and 72° HTA and STA, this bike looks perfectly balanced.

Gillott was ahead of his time.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for that I had only just been wondering what the angles were!

Scooper said:
Beautiful job!

What strikes me is the head tube and seat tube angles. Many of the fifties English and American frames seem to have slacker angles - on the order of 70°. With its moderate length chainstays and 72° HTA and STA, this bike looks perfectly balanced.

Gillott was ahead of his time.


And now I know!:thumbsup:
 

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Scooper said:
What strikes me is the head tube and seat tube angles. Many of the fifties English and American frames seem to have slacker angles - on the order of 70°. With its moderate length chainstays and 72° HTA and STA, this bike looks perfectly balanced.
What strikes me is the massive fork rake. With the traditional relaxed angles, a long rake gives an acceptable Trail figure but the Trail on this bike must be very small, which will produce very fast handling. That I don't understand.
 

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Mike T. said:
What strikes me is the massive fork rake. With the traditional relaxed angles, a long rake gives an acceptable Trail figure but the Trail on this bike must be very small, which will produce very fast handling. That I don't understand.
There is very little trail on this bike and that will result in quick (or "squirrelly" to some) steering by today's standard. What's surprising to me is that there isn't even less trail.

Retired framebuilder Dave Moulton has a nice article on trail, fork rake, and a little bit of history HERE. In his blog, Dave says that "Bicycles built in the 1930s through the 1950s typically had as much as 3 ½ inches (9cm.) of fork rake resulting in very little trial, often zero. There was a theory at that time that trail made steering heavy and sluggish."

 

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Scooper said:
There is very little trail on this bike and that will result in quick (or "squirrelly" to some) steering by today's standard. What's surprising to me is that there isn't even less trail.

Retired framebuilder Dave Moulton has a nice article on trail, fork rake, and a little bit of history HERE. In his blog, Dave says that "Bicycles built in the 1930s through the 1950s typically had as much as 3 ½ inches (9cm.) of fork rake resulting in very little trial, often zero. There was a theory at that time that trail made steering heavy and sluggish."
The days of long rake/short trail on British frames was a bit before my time. I started with a custom Harry Quinn in '62. I don't remember too much about its rake/trail and I don't have a side shot of it (just a 3/4 head on) but I'm sure it wasn't a massive rake.

Here it is -
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Mike T. said:
I applaud you for restoring this fine frame. I didn't say "fine bike" as it's far from being period correct! A P-P-PHIL hub?? :eek:

Nice bike anyway! :thumbsup:
Thanks. The plan is to buy period correct bits as and when they come up. I'll then use this stuff on another project I have in mind.

If I ever find a seat post binder bolt I'll tell you how she rides!!!!!
 

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72/72 was fairly typical 50's English road racing geometry, as opposed to 73/71 which was common for 'clubmans' bikes. Bear in mind that Brooks saddles have short rails that require slacker seat tube angles.
My 1969 Gillott has about 3cm of trail and is perfectly stable, but has a lighter feel at the handlebar than my other bikes with more trail.
 
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