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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Came upon an ad on CL the other week. For some reason I replied and the lady only lived a couple of doors down. It's not a classic or vintage, certainly not new, is not and never was worth anything. So I asked permission from my wife and I bought it (2nd bike in two weeks). I paid more than I should, but everything was original, save for the tires. No rust, a couple of chips here and there, rims look hardly used. I stripped it, cleaned it, threw out the seat (gel gets hard over 20 years) and put it back together.

It's a beast, but pretty fun to ride. Down tube shifting doesn't take that much to get used to. I'm already thinking about upgrading; the possibilities are endless. I can prob. save a pound losing the handlebar and seatpost. Could go SS, FG or 27 speed. Did I mention that it can fit 32c tires on it?

The brakes stop, but they kinda suck. The rear squeals so loud I should prob. wear ear protectors. I did replace whatever pads that were on it with some Kool Stop blocks. The levers are really spongy (I installed cross levers on the top - not spongy), so I was going to replace them. Should I go ahead and replace the brakes too? Or should I just order up some Kool-Stop shoes and pads so that I can toe in the pads?
 

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You can spend a small fortune trying to upgrade the bike and at the end of the day, you'll save 2 pounds on a 23 pound bike...

That's not to say that it can't be improved..New pads, cables and housing will solved most of your brake problems....there is nothing wrong with the brake levers. It's hard to tell from the pictures what model they are but they will function just fine....

What derailleurs and crankset are on the bike now?

BTW, nice score...that is a great looking bike...and don't underestimate the market for old Treks...they certainly have a good following
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The pic is after I had changed the pads, cables and housing (and installed the cross levers). The derailleurs are Suntour Accushift 3040 and the crank is some Sugino. I replaced the 52/40 setup with a 48/36. 6 speeds in the back.
 

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bosax said:
The pic is after I had changed the pads, cables and housing (and installed the cross levers). The derailleurs are Suntour Accushift 3040 and the crank is some Sugino. I replaced the 52/40 setup with a 48/36. 6 speeds in the back.
Adding decent shoes and pad will increase braking performance tremendously....


The problem you have is the brakes on the bike use external nuts. In order to use nicer(more modern) brakes, you'll need to modify the frame and fork to accept recessed nuts of modern brakes.. While it's certainly possible to modify the frame/fork, you'll increase performance by just adding better shoes and pads...

Just my .02cents
 

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I would upgrade the brake pads to Kool Stop salmon colored pads. These are, arguably, the best pads that Kool Stop makes. Setting them up with toe-in should alleviate the noise issue.
 

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Ultegra's work but.....

I have an '88 400T and I have a mixed bag of Shimano groups on it. I bought the newer Ultegra brake calipers, but the reach for the rear brake is very hard to set (I/E PAIN IN THE ARSE). IF you do upgrade the calipers I would get a set of Tiagras, they have a longer reach.
Rob

 
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