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Devoid of all flim-flam
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mapei Roida no longer rides a Mapei.

Note the chainstays. The right one is different from the left.

I swapped over as many components as I could from my old bike, a Colnago Dream. Saddle and handlebar tape colors (as well as stem height) are still tentative. Don't give me grief over them.

The bicycle is surprisingly beautiful in person. The tubes are narrow, something that gives the frame a slight but distinct retro aura. At the same time, though, the tubes are uniquely, almost organically shaped. The seat stays almost look like human tendons. Shades of Leonardo da Vinci...

Ride quality is supple. The ride is at least as good as it was on my lugged steel Rambouillet. Thanks to a more relaxed head tube angle and a slightly longer wheelbase, the bicycle handles a little more gently than the more upscale Time bikes. It is extremely stable. It can be easily ridden with no hands. But it'll dive into a corner if you want to. I haven't ridden very far on it so far, but it seems like it'll be a good all day bike. The only parameter that is slightly disappointing is sheer sprinting ability (not that sprinting is my forte, anyway). My Dream was slightly stiffer in the bottom bracket.

As shown it weighs 17.7 lbs.
 

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Nice bike.

I tend to lust after metal frames, but the Times appeal to me. Largely due to the fact that they (and some of the Looks) seem like they'd have that comfortable all-day ride quality you mention. I was ogling one in person a few weeks ago; it's a muscular look but it works.

How plush do you think you can you go on tires before you run out of clearance? A true 25c? More?
 

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Devoid of all flim-flam
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The 2006 Time brochure says that the frames are designed for no more than 23c's. But staring at my bike, I think it could easily handle a true 25c. I don't think I'd go for a 28, though. And I must tell you that every Look I've tried has been more plush than my Time. And the Colnago C50 I tried was even more plush than the Looks!

Personally, I'm not emotionally wedded to any one material, brand name or technology. If the machine catches my eye and feels good underneath me, I want it...no matter what it is or where it comes from.
 

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Mapei Roida said:
The 2006 Time brochure says that the frames are designed for no more than 23c's. But staring at my bike, I think it could easily handle a true 25c. I don't think I'd go for a 28, though. And I must tell you that every Look I've tried has been more plush than my Time. And the Colnago C50 I tried was even more plush than the Looks!

Personally, I'm not emotionally wedded to any one material, brand name or technology. If the machine catches my eye and feels good underneath me, I want it...no matter what it is or where it comes from.

What a breath of fresh air. I am certainly glad to see someone say what I also feel, since I've felt a bit alone on a lot of boards. You have a nice bike, and you give a good description of it in how it compares to others in a way I can relate to.

I just want to say thanks.
 

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my c40 hp has side-specific chainstays as well. de rosa was known for this, and some custom builder would orient their tubes as such so this goes back a bit, theoreticaly these arrangements could offset the torque, but even if not effective it is cool.

as for a stable ride characteristic, i once asked a district champ crit and track sprinter about the differences between his bikes, and he told me one was more relaxed, rather than be of the opinion this was a disadvantage, he told me he did not know why people would think this quicker handling trait was an edge, due to if you are bumped, you will more likely stay up on the relaxed ride. and this guy knew a thing or two both about being bumped and (ouch) the results thereof.

as for a flexy ride not being sprint worthy, i flash back to the guys dominating crits on the noodly vitus aluminum bikes proving otherwise. i was told technique and application of superior power overcome this.

nice bike, i have lusted after time vx's as well.

p.s. django is both show and go...




Mapei Roida said:
Mapei Roida no longer rides a Mapei.

Note the chainstays. The right one is different from the left.


Ride quality is supple. The ride is at least as good as it was on my lugged steel Rambouillet. Thanks to a more relaxed head tube angle and a slightly longer wheelbase, the bicycle handles a little more gently than the more upscale Time bikes. It is extremely stable. It can be easily ridden with no hands. But it'll dive into a corner if you want to. I haven't ridden very far on it so far, but it seems like it'll be a good all day bike. The only parameter that is slightly disappointing is sheer sprinting ability (not that sprinting is my forte, anyway). My Dream was slightly stiffer in the bottom bracket.

As shown it weighs 17.7 lbs.
 

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Nice one!

Really nice bike. I've been looking at them since they came out in 2003. Probably would have bought one instead of the C40 I got if they were more widely distributed in the UK at that time.

Did you have to cut the Translink initially and what's the range of adjustment?

Hope all is well. I've been traveling a lot, both in and outside of China, and haven't ridden on the road since the end of November! Will be getting on the road in the next month of so as the weather gets better in Shanghai. I'm in Hong Kong now where I can't get over the steepness of some of the hills in Central.

Enjoy the ride, a good choice.
 

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nice! What size is it?

Very elegant and Time(less) Look! (puns intended?)

What size is the frame and how tall are you (height, inseam)?

thanks

good and safe riding to you!
 

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Sweet.

I'm currently on an older VX Special Pro and ride is both solid and smooth. I too had always loved the look of the Times, but the cost.... Luckily I managed to pick one up at a reasonable price and am glad that I did.

BTW boneman, I am living on Lantau (HK) and my regular ride to Mui Wo takes me on a road with 1:6 (16% !!!) gradient signs most of the way up - so I know what you mean about these bloody steep hills around here, it hurts even with the compact crank.
 

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Rollin' Stones
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Simple.

That is a very nice bike. Now, we cannot be friends because I will be thinking of a way to steal it from you. Have a nice day. :)
 

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Looks great! What kind/brand of saddle is that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks everybody for the kind words. I need them. It's not easy putting a Colnago out to pasture.

Boneman: First offf, glad to know you're still kicking. You live a life of adventure. And I agree that Central can be a mighty steep place. Can you imagine climbing to the top of the Peak? Yow!

As for the bike, the dealer, the Time Outlet in Santa Barbara, cut the translink for me. They had my Colnago to take the various measurements from, and they did a great job transferring those measurements over to the new bike. The translink is designed to give 3cm of adjustment. The dealer cut mine so that my current adjustment is as low as it can go. They do it this way because they figure you can always cut more of the translink off if you need to go lower, but you can never put any of the cut part back. The frame, meantime, is supplied with a cutting guide that fits both the translink and the fork steerer tube. It might be said, too, that the inside of the translink is a perfect 27.2. Thus, you can always convert the frame to "classic" if required.

acid rider: The bicycle is Extra Small. 51cm seat tube, 53 top tube. I'm about 5''7". My clothing inseam is 30". I can never remember my Bicycle Inseam measurement.

Mr. Versatile: The saddle is a Fizik Vitesse. 250 grams. I'll probably buy a black one simply to see how it looks, but I must say that the look of the tan one is growing on me. It lends the frame a bit of whimsy. It makes this very serious looking bicycle seem a bit less serious.
 

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huh

Whats a Translink?
Thanks.


akdeluxe
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Colker: It already corners like heaven. As for the 'Nag, I don't have a place to hang one more bike. What's more, I like to think of myself as a frugal sort. The Time and the Colnago fill the same niche in my collection. One of them must go.

Towerscum: Time frames come in a variation in which the seat tube, instead of ending at the top tube, extends up past the top tube and takes the place of the seat post. Thus, the saddle is connected directly to the seat tube. Time Sport calls this idea Translink. One upside is that you supposedly save about an ounce of weight. Another supposed upside is that the frame becomes just a little more rigid. On the downside, you don't have a lot of leeway when it comes to adjusting your saddle height. Once you cut the seat tube down to (supposedly) match your inseam, the mechanism that attaches the saddle to the tube only gives you 3cm to play with. A gimmick? I frankly don't know. It does, however, add about three hundred dollars to the retail price of the frame.
 

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Windrider (Stubborn)
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Beautifult bike......

I've got an itch for a carbon, but won't scratch it for a while......I really like the Times,

As you say...simple.

As to the saddle.....get a custome red and black ....stylin'

Len
 

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Mapei Roida said:
Colker: It already corners like heaven. As for the 'Nag, I don't have a place to hang one more bike. What's more, I like to think of myself as a frugal sort. The Time and the Colnago fill the same niche in my collection. One of them must go.

Towerscum: Time frames come in a variation in which the seat tube, instead of ending at the top tube, extends up past the top tube and takes the place of the seat post. Thus, the saddle is connected directly to the seat tube. Time Sport calls this idea Translink. One upside is that you supposedly save about an ounce of weight. Another supposed upside is that the frame becomes just a little more rigid. On the downside, you don't have a lot of leeway when it comes to adjusting your saddle height. Once you cut the seat tube down to (supposedly) match your inseam, the mechanism that attaches the saddle to the tube only gives you 3cm to play with. A gimmick? I frankly don't know. It does, however, add about three hundred dollars to the retail price of the frame.
i just rediscovered an old bike. i bought the frame in 96 and it was already vintage. after years going from basement to garage etc.. the other day, i tuned the cables, oiled the chain and took it for a spin.. i fell in love again and i'm finding qualities i didn't know were there.
keep the nago frame. stash it somewhere.. rebuild it sometime in the future. selling bikes is never a good idea.
 
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