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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I am excited, my older son wants to get a road bike; he is 29 and I have been wanting a family member to ride with me for the last year. I can't get my wife to get a road bike (she has a hybrid, but thinks I won't stay with her on rides, which is not true), my daughter would be a great candidate, but she now lives in New York, so we wouldn't get to ride together and my youngest son is a little reluctant because he had a pretty bad fall last year on his bike.

So now to my older son, any suggestions? He had been riding a mountain bike, but changed the wheels so he can ride in the Tour de Cure (only 33 miles) and now wants to do some longer distances with me. I plan on getting him a good fit and making sure he test rides as much as possible. Not sure if I would actually buy him the bike, but I am definately willing to help him upgrade if he has a certain price point in mind but is interested in something that is outside his budget.

I think all of my children are thinking, "how is it Dad can do these long rides and I can't keep up with him?"

So to summuraize, any ideas where to look at first? I'm thinking something aluminum with carbon forks and seat stays. Also, how do I not be overbearing and perhaps turn him off from looking.

I am anxious to ride Skyline Drive with my children.
 

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any ideas where to look at first?
At a good bike shop. Pick a price point, and suggest that he him do some test rides on bikes that fit him. Then help him buy the one that feels best, and that he likes, without regard to frame materials and all that other stuff that don't matter much. Telling him he needs carbon seatstays is a good start on that overbearing thing you're trying to avoid.

If you know you have a good shop that will do the fit right, maybe you don't even want to go with him (excited as you are), unless he specifically asks you to.
 

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I think price point is important. If it's his first road bike I'd suggest something with a relaxed geometry to start. Being comfortable means being able to ride longer and usually faster.

Not knowing budget.... I like the Giant defy line. Good components (105) at a reasonable cost. The Trek 2. line is similar. I know every manufacturer has thier equivilent.

If you have a lot of disposable income there's the Cervelo RS....

There are cheaper options but I prefer to stay with a minimum of 105 componets which keep bike cost over $1000

Best bet is to visit you lbs and ride a few.
 

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I just went through this...

a couple of months ago. My daughter asked to go road riding with me. I would tell her about my rides and the things I saw ect. and never asked her to road ride with me. We'd mt bike on occassion which was cool, but the date she asked me to hit the road brought a tear to my eye. :p My friend runs the LBS so I called and told him about it and he set her up with a bike. Fitted her to it and said go have fun. We picked it up Saturday so she could tool around on it and get used to the shifting and brakes and Sunday morning we went for a nice ride. We rode and I picked a reasonable distance. Something she could handle fairly easy and I used it as a recovery ride. I couldn't believe how much she could talk. ;-) but it was one of the best things I could have done for her. So, Sunday evening I called and told him I wasn't bringing the bike back. :) She used it all summer to go to her friends to. Hers was the trek wsd (woman specific design) and she loved it. So, don't pressure him. Just make small suggestions and make sure you let him make the final decision so he's part of the process. Train on your own and just enjoy the company. If/when he gets more serious you'll know it. Trek has some great entry level bikes out there worthy of upgrades when things wear out.
Even now we talk about doing some local bike trails. SO far so good and good luck to you. It's a great investment...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Urb said:
I think price point is important. If it's his first road bike I'd suggest something with a relaxed geometry to start. Being comfortable means being able to ride longer and usually faster.

Not knowing budget.... I like the Giant defy line. Good components (105) at a reasonable cost. The Trek 2. line is similar. I know every manufacturer has thier equivilent.

If you have a lot of disposable income there's the Cervelo RS....

There are cheaper options but I prefer to stay with a minimum of 105 componets which keep bike cost over $1000

Best bet is to visit you lbs and ride a few.
I have the Cervelo RS, but was definatley thinking along the lines of something with 105 components for him. He is pretty athletic, does Capoeira (a martial arts form), ran track in high school, so I was thinking he would enjoy something a little more aggressive.

@Jcavilia - great comment, because I want to make sure he has Speedplay pedals, a Fizik saddle and carbon bottle cages :D so I really am trying to guide him without telling him what to get.

There are a couple of good LBS's here, or I can turn him over to my sales person, who would take care of him, but he would probably end up with a Pinerello or Cervello S3:rolleyes:

Appreciate the responses.
 

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Tommy Walker said:
I am anxious to ride Skyline Drive with my children.
Maybe you could offer to pay for your son to rent a bike a couple of times to see how he likes the bike and riding with Dad? If you're concerned about being overbearing, that might be a lower pressure way to get a few rides in and see how things go.

Are you referring to Skyline Drive in the SF Bay Area? Wow. If so, first you have to get up there (ugh!), and then it's a pretty busy road without much shoulder in places if I recall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
bike981 said:
Maybe you could offer to pay for your son to rent a bike a couple of times to see how he likes the bike and riding with Dad? If you're concerned about being overbearing, that might be a lower pressure way to get a few rides in and see how things go.

Are you referring to Skyline Drive in the SF Bay Area? Wow. If so, first you have to get up there (ugh!), and then it's a pretty busy road without much shoulder in places if I recall.
Good suggestion; actually two LBS's would let me take a bike all day for a test ride.

The Skyline Drive I'm talking about is here in Virginia. It is 105 miles through the Shenandoah's http://www.nps.gov/shen/planyourvisit/driving-skyline-drive.htm
It's on my bucket list along with 5 golf courses (Pebble Beach, Bethpaige Black, Whistling Straights, Pinehurst #2 and Augusta National) and catching a train from DC after watching a Nats game, then to New York to see the Yankees in Yankee Stadium and then to Philly to see the Phillies.
 

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Tommy Walker said:
Good suggestion; actually two LBS's would let me take a bike all day for a test ride.

The Skyline Drive I'm talking about is here in Virginia. It is 105 miles through the Shenandoah's http://www.nps.gov/shen/planyourvisit/driving-skyline-drive.htm
It's on my bucket list along with 5 golf courses (Pebble Beach, Bethpaige Black, Whistling Straights, Pinehurst #2 and Augusta National) and catching a train from DC after watching a Nats game, then to New York to see the Yankees in Yankee Stadium and then to Philly to see the Phillies.
Hey, that train goes to Boston, too. You gotta put Fenway on that itinerary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
JCavilia said:
Hey, that train goes to Boston, too. You gotta put Fenway on that itinerary.
Will do, the trick is finding out when they all play at home back to back.
 

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Tommy Walker said:
Will do, the trick is finding out when they all play at home back to back.
Yeah, that may well be impossible. It would be cool if you could catch two of the teams at the junction of a home-and-home series.

Then you could catch Amtrak's Lake Shore Limited from Boston, pick up an Indians game in Cleveland, and go on to Chicago to connect with the Cubs and White Sox via the El.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Keeping up with Junior said:
Upgrade your stuff and give him your hand me downs.
That would be great, but my RS turns 1 year old next week and I love it. It is the perfect bike for me; I can ride it forever and feel no pain.
 

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Part of the "fun" in this sport is choosing, tweaking, and upgrading your stuff. So allow him to pick a bike from a nice starter level. 7005 aluminum and 105 maybe? Lots of nice C-Dales, treks, and even euro bikes at that range. Then he can spend time researching which bike to pick and why 105 is OK over Ultegra hehe.

That said, if he was 10 years younger, I would suggest you get him this:

http://www.kirkleebicycles.com/photo_gallery/
 

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my son rides with me .... 8yrs old... he rides a xs giant ocr (craigslist deal)
he's good for a sold 30miles, but then again i pull the entire time

enjoy it's great bonding no matter the age
 

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It seems to me the world is full of very good bicycles that almost new and have not been ridden much. Would be cyclists buy them, try them for a week or so, and park them in their garages. I bought a Trek 1200 for my grandson about a month ago. It probably doesn't have 200 miles on it and cost me half the price of a new one, even though it has better components. (In order to maintain price points manufacturers keep downgrading components. So today's $1000 bike comes with Sora, whereas five years ago it came with Tiagra/105, etc.) I would check ebay, Craigslist, even your LBS. After all, if you buy a new bike, you son may be parking it in HIS garage in a few weeks and you may be looking for a way to get back part of YOUR investment. :D
 
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