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I got a nail in my (brand new!) rear tire. I replaced the tube, but the rest of the ride felt pretty bumpy. Granted, I was riding on 40psi. Looks like I lost a nice chunk of rubber, and the tire thread is showing. Is there a DIY fix (dollar bill?) or do I need to replace the tire? Bicycle tire Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle part Bicycle accessory Rim
 

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Glue a bicycle patch to the inside of the tire or if you have it, cut a piece of thin tire sidewall and glue that to the inside of the tire using tube patching glue. If you use the sidewall method, use a nice thin sidewall from a foldable tire or tubular. I'm currently running a front tire (which, like yours, cut when near-new) with a tube patch on the inside and it works fine.
 

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Schuylkill Trail Bum
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Given Conti's already dismal record for sidewall reliability, I'd replace it.

Otherwise, I'd be scared shtless on fast downhills.
 

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Given Conti's already dismal record for sidewall reliability, I'd replace it.

Otherwise, I'd be scared shtless on fast downhills.

I'd replace it, Conti or otherwise.
 

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Given Conti's already dismal record for sidewall reliability, I'd replace it.

Otherwise, I'd be scared shtless on fast downhills.
I would submit that you are easy to scare.

While it's hard to tell from the picture or the OP's description (40 psi gave a bumpy ride? really?) if the tire doesn't bulge when booted, it will be fine. Even if it bulges a little bit, all that will mean is that it will wear faster at the bulge.

I've ridden thousands of miles on booted tires with no issues.
 

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Bumpy ride? I've booted really bad punctures to get home and it's more like a tick, tick, once per revolution if there are any ill effects to ride quality related to the puncture.
And I'm taking about much worse than I see in the picture. I'd be shocked if you could feel that. It's close but I'm not even sure that would come into contact with the ground when you ride.
 

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Schuylkill Trail Bum
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I would submit that you are easy to scare.

While it's hard to tell from the picture or the OP's description (40 psi gave a bumpy ride? really?) if the tire doesn't bulge when booted, it will be fine. Even if it bulges a little bit, all that will mean is that it will wear faster at the bulge.

I've ridden thousands of miles on booted tires with no issues.
Well you would submit wrong then.

Replacing damaged or defective equipment, especially tires, is just common sense. Not fear.
 

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Well you would submit wrong then.

Replacing damaged or defective equipment, especially tires, is just common sense. Not fear.
Agreed. You can buy a new tire a lot easier than you can recover from an accident. A tire is simply not worth it.
 

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I would probably boot it and put it on the rear, but use a good quality, reliable boot (something like the Park Tire Boot or reasonable facsimile) .

That said, if you continue to use it, and have a bad fall, please don't come back here and yell at me. It's your life/face/teeth. Do what you think is in your best interest.
 

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Park says their tire boots are for temporary use only. They don't really stick to the tire very well, and are quite stiff. I tried one cut in half as a permanent fix, and the edge of the patch wore through the replacement tube after a few rides.

I don't think that tube patches would work very well, either.

Now I carry a larger piece of Tyvek (from an overnight envelope, for example) as a wrapper around my spare tube. It's protection for the tube in my saddle bag, and makes a strong emergency boot.

~~~~~~

Permanent tire repair


The tire fabric is what holds the air pressure in the tire. It's hard to glue on a patch that can take the strain.

If I have a big enough slice to cause a bulge after reinflating, I've been throwing the tire in the trash. No bulging? I ride it--and I'd likely switch it to be the rear tire.

But this post sounds like it would really work. It's a patch that covers bead-to-bead.

From the post:
Do a full repair with sailcloth (ask any sailmaker for some dacron sailcloth appropriate for dingies -a foot or so of scrap probably won't cost you anything and it is A-1 first class patching material for permanent tire casing repairs, even large ones). Cut the boot oversize. I often go bead to bead and and inch or more beyond the cut. Glue in with contractor's contact cement. (The stuff with real warning re: fumes. Take the warnings seriously.) This will last as long as the rest of the tire except that taking the tire on and off tends to be hard on the gluing and will sometimes need to have the edges glued down again. Sailcloth matches the feel and performance of tires really well and you will not notice it at all riding.​
 

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Park says their tire boots are for temporary use only.
Of course they do. All 'boots' are 'temporary' by their very nature. Park has no way to know the specific circumstances of each individuals application.

In the case of the OP's tire, a boot is just a level of safety for a tire that is marginally still safe. If the sidewall was cut, or the tire had a larger hole, then yes, a boot is just something to get you home.

The park boot may be a little overkill for this situation, but it would still work just fine.

A layer or three of duct tape or some similar product would probably work well here too.
 

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I would probably boot it and put it on the rear, but use a good quality, reliable boot (something like the Park Tire Boot or reasonable facsimile) .

That said, if you continue to use it, and have a bad fall, please don't come back here and yell at me. It's your life/face/teeth. Do what you think is in your best interest.


I think this says it all. "Oh, it's perfectly safe, but..........

Small Print Disclaimer: While numerous studies show doing --- is safe, use at your own risk. You agree not to sue us for any injury, inconvenience, etc, etc."




 

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wut?
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I would submit that you are easy to scare.

While it's hard to tell from the picture or the OP's description (40 psi gave a bumpy ride? really?) if the tire doesn't bulge when booted, it will be fine. Even if it bulges a little bit, all that will mean is that it will wear faster at the bulge.

I've ridden thousands of miles on booted tires with no issues.
I agree with Kerry, and I've also ridden thousands of miles on booted tires with no issues.
 
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