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Bike Wing Conspiracy
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
She walked out from the front of the bus while I was flying alongside the bus splitting lanes.

I stood up out of the saddle and yelled as soon as she stepped in my path. My shoulder hit her in the chest and she went flying.

She got up and started apologizing to me. Then she limped off to the other side of the street.

I asked her if she was all right and she was more concerned about me. What should I have done?

I rode the rest of the way to work in a daze.

This was in Union Square going up Park Ave. South. This is the second time in 2 years this has happened to me.
 

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BrooklynVelo
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I try to stay clear of the streets directly around Union Square, be it on bike or in the car. Between the park and the Farmers Markets people seem to forget that there are streets around the park. If I have to go through there I always cut the center line of traffic and stay clear of the far right. Also be diligent about lights around there. Lots of cops with nothing better to do than ticket you.
 

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Bike Wing Conspiracy
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was in the center of traffic.

She walked into my path from the front of a bus into the middle of the lane.

She wasnt on the bus disembarking, she was walking around it from the front.
 

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Banned forever.....or not
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You did the right thing.
 

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First, you should not have posted on RBR! :) I have every sympathy for you, as I, too, ride in NYC and can't stand oblivious pedestrians. They are the scourge of cyclists. But people on this board are going to flame you when they read you were "flying alongside the bus splitting lanes," and that this is your second offense.

The only advice I can offer for next time is ride as if you are invisible. In NYC we often have no choice but to split lanes--but when you do, assume someone is always going to step into your path from a blind corner like that. In a situation like that, I'll slow to less than 10 mph until I'm in the clear, or otherwise swing into the middle of the adjoining lane so I can see around the corner. Not always easy to do when traffic next to you is doing 35 mph...

Just curious, was the bus stopped at a corner, or between corners? Was she in a crosswalk?
 

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I have near misses with ignorant peds like this every week. I'd say it's 80 percent her fault, but what can you do? You still end up riding all the way to work feeling like crap. I've seriously thought about getting a bell and ringing it like crazy anytime I'm in traffic.
 

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courtesy

Your civility as well as hers are commendable. As I read your post, I expected you to write about her screaming and yelling, your griping, etc. Glad to see that everyone was ok. I have to agree w/ the poster who mentioned getting a bell. I often ride on paved trails and although I call out 'ON YOUR LEFT', most often the walkers/joggers are shocked or frightened or move in such as fashion (as in, 'Is someone talking to me, I'll stop and turn around') as to make it less safe. Bells bells bells!!

I do, however, agree w/ the other poster who said you need to slow down in those high-traffic areas. Seems that cyclists should receive the same benefits that are granted to walking pedestrians, but at the same time, we must be resopnsible for operating a machine that moves us across the road at any speed (which increases our 'mass') and decreases our ability to stop or turn quickly (joggers can do that).

Again, glad to hear that everyone is ok.
 

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I have sympathy for you too, onespeed, I have close calls like that all the time. Something similar happened to me on the Williamsburg bridge last year...

I was just about in the middle, starting the descent to Brooklyn and I saw a group of guys quite a ways away. I yelled, pulled over as far to the right as I could and slowed down. Three of them moved to the left but the fourth was oblivious, and actually moved right into my path at the last second, causing me to slam into him.

I went flying, landed directly on my head, messed up my knees pretty badly and spent the night in the ER. He was unscathed and apologized profusely.

I was pretty pissed off, but at least he acted like he cared that I was hurt. So I guess the moral of the story is wear your helmet and remember that nowhere in NYC is safe from clueless pedestrians, not even the bridge!
 

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In a (somewhat) related question, I've noticed a lot of people step out directly in front of my bike, even when I'm all by myself in the middle of a lane (not splitting, no parked cars to obstruct the view), and I can see they never glanced up or down the road.

I'm assuming people that just walk into a busy road without looking would have been wiped out of our gene pool by now, so it's left me wondering -- do a lot of people rely on their hearing to warn there is traffic on the road, and only look then? Does the silence of a bike throw that off? It's not that they are ignoring me, I can see they quite clearly never even looked.

Maybe we should invest in hockey cards to put in our spokes again...
 

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stcanard, I've often wondered the same thing myself. Do these people regularly walk into the middle of the street without so much as a cursory glace, or am I just lucky enough to catch every single one of them on an uncommonly idiotic day? I jaywalk all the time, but come on, if you can't turn your head to check for oncoming traffic in the middle of the city should you really be allowed outside your house?

Today I was riding down Second avenue, and a man was just standing in the middle of the road. Now, he might have been senile or drunk or something, but he looked pretty content to be staring into oncoming traffic, waiting for a gap so that he could finish crossing the street. Where could he possibly have been going that was so important that he couldn't wait another 30 seconds for the light to change?
 

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Racial Profiler
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cdmc said:
If she was cute you should have gotten her number and told her you would love to give her a massage to help ease the pain.
I thought that was more or less where this was leading with the thread title.
 

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I would guess hearing and peripheral vision would be prime, but also being aware of bikes. If you are looking for a truck or car and not looking for a bike or a motorcycle you probably won’t see the cycle with a quick glance.
I was riding my mtb to work one day and found myself getting ready to cross the railroad tracks. I was under a freeway overpass, and in front of a large burm. The track was curved to my left around the burm. The rocks that supported the tracks were the size of softballs and I had to walk the bike. It was a good thing cuz when I looked to my left the train was 10 feet away from me. I didn’t hear it, didn’t see it in my peripheral vision, and I wasn’t expecting to see. It scared the crap out of me. The cool part about it is I submitted the story to Bicycling Mag and won a contest where I received about $300 of stuff.
 

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the only time I've hit a pedestrian it was the same situation, she walked between two parked cars in the middle of the block (in downtown SF FWIW), I was riding a messnger bike w/ a big basket in front and it knocked her flat....the aftermath was the same, she apologized and walked away, no nastiness on either side
 
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