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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've researched, visited several local LBS, test rode several bikes and have narrowed the search to two:

2008 Bianchi C2C Via Narone 7
Campy Veloce Components
Fac Michelin Racing 28h wheels
http://www.bianchiusa.com/08-bicycles/08-c2c/08-c2c-nirone-veloce.html

2009 Orbea Gavia
Shimano 105 Components
Shimano R-500 wheels
http://www.orbea-usa.com/fly.aspx?layout=bikes&taxid=57&pid=158

Both are comfortable. I like both LBS's. It comes down to:
Bianchi vs Orbea
Campy Veloce vs Shimano 105
Wheels: I don't know much about wheels yet. Maybe some readers can advise me on the above wheel comparisons.


Please offer your advise, wisdom and direction on my final two above choices.

Thanks.
 

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Bianchi by a mile, but then I guess my user name says it all. I'd take the Campy Veloce over 105. Bottom line, you won't go wrong with either. If cost is a major consideration, sort it out by looking at the components, warranty and the shop/source that will provide you with the best ongoing service.
 

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Descender
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WHat is the cost of each bike - if it is close to equal than I agree with the Bianchi. Although either bike is fine - go ride them again and make sure you like the fit of both.
 

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Shimano wheel comment.

Can only comment on the Shimano R-500 wheels. They're a bit old in the tooth because they have been replaced by the R-550s—surprised to see the R-500s on a 2009 bike. As low-end wheels go (around $150/pair on eBay), the 500/550s roll no better or no worse than other $150 wheels, but, IMO, have some real shortcomings inherent to the nipple-at-the-hub design. They need special Shimano spokes ("sorry, have to order those"), a special spoke wrench, and trueing is not easy. On the plus side, the hubs are cup-and-cone, meaning the hub bearings can be cleaned and regreased every so often. Back to the bad and strictly anecdotal, but I've opened several R-500/550s and found almost no factory grease in them (especially the front), with the cones already pitted or scored after a few hundred miles.

If you go for the Orbea, I would ask if the wheels could be replaced at a reasonable upcharge with something a little better and easier to true and repair in case a spoke breaks. At the very least, take the R-500 front wheel out and spin it. If there's roughness, have the shop open the hub and fix the problem. Or just ride the R-500s and eBay them later—"they look just like Dura-Ace wheels from 10 feet away!" :)
 

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Those Shimano wheels ride rough. You will definitely want to upgrade them when you can afford it. The difference in ride will be dramatic.
 

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dekindy said:
Those Shimano wheels ride rough. You will definitely want to upgrade them when you can afford it. The difference in ride will be dramatic.
Can't agree with that—in my view, wheels don't "ride" rough or smooth. Whatever difference there is between wheels gets totally lost in tire pressure/size/type variations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
wim said:
If you go for the Orbea, I would ask if the wheels could be replaced at a reasonable upcharge with something a little better and easier to true and repair in case a spoke breaks. At the very least, take the R-500 front wheel out and spin it. If there's roughness, have the shop open the hub and fix the problem. Or just ride the R-500s and eBay them later—"they look just like Dura-Ace wheels from 10 feet away!" :)
Thanks for the input of wheels wim.
Please let me know if you could suggest a wheelset upgrade that would be an improvement on performance, reliability and maintainable. For example, if I could offer to kick in +/- $100 to upgrade the wheelset, what should I ask for?
 

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I think you're comparing disimilar bikes. The Bianchi has carbon seatstays, and more relaxed geometry. I considered the Via Nirone once, but it's a little pigish in the weight department. I personally like the Gavia.
 

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mad max said:
Thanks for the input of wheels wim.
Please let me know if you could suggest a wheelset upgrade that would be an improvement on performance, reliability and maintainable. For example, if I could offer to kick in +/- $100 to upgrade the wheelset, what should I ask for?
Sorry, I'm no longer competent to suggest something for you—quit the bidness a few years ago. Also, substitutions and upgrades are not a cut-and-dry proposition. Much depends on which wheels the shop has in stock and needs to move, and if they see a chance for the take-offs to make some money for them. Just ask if there's a possibility of a reasonable wheel upgrade.

If there's shop resistance, go to plan B and just ride those R-500s until you can buy a nicer wheelset. Others here will have excellent suggestions. And keep in mind that hanging original wheels in the garage as a spare wheelset (perhaps with another, differently geared cassette so you can make a quick change) is not a bad thing to do. I don't feel right unless I have a spare wheel set with cassette handy for those unforeseen circumstances, or just for not subjecting my better wheels to winter weather or dirt road rides.
 

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Do yourself a favor and get the Bianchi. Those bikes are an overall better deal than the Orbea and it has more brand recognition/prestige for if/when you want to resell.

The only downside is that you'll be a bit slower due to all the gorgeous Italian women throwing themselves at you due to the Campy components. I would know, same reason I only took 10th place in the GC at a local spring series.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the input on the Neuvation wheels. I liked the reviews and info about them.:thumbsup:

The Bianchi sounds like it might come with some safety risks if women will be throwing themselves at the bike. I didn't see a disclaimer regarding that in the brochure; maybe it was in the very, very fine print.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Orthodoc said:
Make sure and get it in celeste :thumbsup:

I wish I could. The LBS has a leftover 2008 Via Nirone on the floor at a discount that makes it affordable. It's red with white bar tape. Beggers can't be choosers. Maybe celeste someday.
 

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C'mon, red is also cool.
 

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Id go for the bianchi. then buy some wheels from neuvation ($200-250ish). then use the stock wheels for bad weather.... its kind of nice to have tire that's better for wet surfaces loaded up on some cheaper wheels. Also if you ever have a tire issue when youre about to leave for a ride you can just swap the wheel and deal with it later.
 

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Sojourneyman said:
Mechanically, it'll be a lot harder to find campy stuff than shimano.
I beg to differ, any decent shop will AT LEAST be able to order in Campy products.

As for the wheel issue, Cat 4/5 it's hardly a thing to consider and in higher cats you can always run a jtek, that's what I'll be doing when I get my 3 upgrade.
 
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