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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought this new in 1986, and rode the hell out of it for the next several years (raced a few Cat 4 races to…not great results). I did my own maintenance, but then…I got married, focused on work and added about 50 pounds. At that weight, when I did find time to ride, I felt the Pinarello was not a good choice, that my weight was not good for it (wheels especially).

I’m 58, and lost a lot of weight. My 11 year old daughter likes to ride, and we’re talking about a few t-shirt rides. I’d like to get the Pinarello (neglected in storage for 25 years) up and running. Not a renovation for display, but to ride (hundreds of miles per year, not thousands, like before).
I’d like to not update to modern components. I want to keep the cleat/toe clip pedals, and all the Super Record components. That said- the cover over one brake lever is cracked from age- am I looking at a NOS Campy lever or can I just get the cover? (I need to replace the brake pads, right?)
How do the chain ring teeth look? Need to be replaced?
I used a Suntour 13/23 freewheel, because I wanted the lifetime of steel use, but now I’m wondering about a SR freewheel (because I won’t put as many miles on). Thoughts?
I need to probably just have the Mavic wheels respoked and tried by somebody who knows what they’re doing.
The frame- the paint isn’t that bad- I should probably clean it and polish the chrome to see what it looks like? I definitely need new decals. Should I have a pro put them on?
I live in Arlington, Texas, between Dallas and Foet Worth. Any tips on service sources?
Thanks, and I’ll hang up and listen.
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Note- I definitely want to do cosmetic fixes that are period-appropriate, like new tape on the handle bars. Any ideas on a seat replacement?
 

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Note- I definitely want to do cosmetic fixes that are period-appropriate, like new tape on the handle bars. Any ideas on a seat replacement?
That's a nice bike, really. First thing I'd do is clean it up. It's easier to tell what condition the bike is in when it's clean. From here, it looks pretty good, and really probably doesn't have nearly as much wear-and-tear on it as you might think, if you only raced it a couple of seasons, and did at least some maintenance on it. I'd also check the chain for wear (12" intervals from any pin center to another pin center is an unworn one), and if it isn't too bad, I'd bet the rest of the drivetrain, and the bike, isn't all that worn, either. If it is, you'll be on the hook for spendy bits (a cogset), and possibly even spendier bits (chainrings).

Then, I'd decide if I was really going to ride it, or make it period-correct, because honestly, riding even high-end bikes like yours has come a long way since the Eighties. Clipless pedals are a significant advancement, as are "aero" brake levers, and modern brake pads, imho, though none are period correct. I don't mind them, but for some, downtube shifters just won't cut it for many. Others freak if the effing dust cap on their pedals isn't genuine Campy. It's really up to you how far you want to take things.

Campy hoods are around, but shockingly expensive, to where many who aren't doing "restorations" use reproductions, or even swap (gasp!) levers for more modern ones. Again, really about your goals.

Re the wheels, I can't tell from the photos, but are they sew-ups, and what condition are the wheels in (posting some close-ups would help to show whether they were cracking, worn sidewalls, etc.)? If I were going to ride it, I'd probably spring for some new rims regardless (assuming the hubs are ok, and if they're Super Records, they likely are) in a wider width, because that frame should have clearance for them.

FWIW, Pinarello and Campy Super Record are desired brands in the restoration market, enough that some might be inclined to sell the thing, even part it out, but me, I'd want to ride it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks! It’s funny, but I have so many fond memories of adventures on that bike- climbs, descents, time trials, pacific highway journeys- part of sticking with old tech is to see if the magic is still there.
And Campy,…even back then, I knew there were other component makers that were lighter and smoother, but when I was climbing a hill in a race, and realized I was in the wrong gear, Campy Let me force it. Got to love it!
 

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Your best bet is eBay for replacement brake hoods, but if you find original Campy hoods, you WILL pay through the nose. Modolo Professional hoods fit, if I recall, but obviously they don't keep the bike original. There was a company by the name of "Ame" or something similar, I believe, that sold Campy replica hoods. You could search for them as well. You shouldn't buy replacement levers because you only need one, and you'll likely only find pairs for sale, and the price will here again, be absurd.

Replace the brake pads. They harden with age. Again, anything original Campy will be expensive. Mathauser made a red-colored brake shoe that fit Campy so if you find those on eBay, they would be a suitable substitute. Your other option is to replace the shoe and the holder. It will be much easier to source, just hold on to the Campy pad holders should you decide to sell the bike.

You can get replacement Cinelli Cork handlebar tape at your local shop or on eBay. Do a search for "Serotta" (yes; that's right) and you'll see some. That's where I got mine.

As long as the gearing is sufficient for your fitness, terrain, and objectives, I wouldn't change a thing. The chainrings look fine. Do not replace the chain because it wore as a unit with the cogs and the chainrings. If you change anything you'll have a headache trying to replace everything so the gears don't skip. Sure; remove and clean the drivetrain but don't swap out for new parts.

If you put new cables on the bike, keep that rear derailleur cable housing at the chainstay. That's the real Campy McCoy.

Those are tubular rims. Considering your riding plans and the fact you have Campy hubs with an older spec rear wheel width (120 or 126mm), your best bet is to have the hubs rebuilt with new rims. Avoid getting tubeless or tubeless-compatible rims. You just want a standard tube and tire rim. I'd recommend a Mavic rim but the company is having troubles now so finding Mavic rims for your build might be difficult. You may have to compromise here and choose another brand. Since weight was/is an issue with you, I'd suggest an off-center rear rim such as a Velocity A23 O/C or the DT Swiss RR411 or RR421. They build up with much more even left/right tension and stay true.

Pinarello used wet transfer decals and never bothered with a clear coat over them, which is why they always self-destructed. There are places that can fabricate and provide decals but I wouldn't bother unless you're going to restore the frame and put the decals under a clear coat which sounds like isn't your intention.

I would surf youtube for videos on how to polish that chrome to remove the rust, and perhaps spiff up the frame.
 

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I wouldn't worry about decals, just give it a good scrubbing with soap and water and maybe wax it with car wax. Replace the cables and housing, brake pads, handlebar tape and here's some replacement hoods, Soma Gum Brake hood pair - really nice! For Campy NR/SR and other similar levers (boulderbicycle.bike) . Repack the headset. hubs and bottom bracket and it should ride like you remember.

If those wheels are sew ups just get those hubs built up with some new clincher rims and spokes. If they're clinchers give them a good going over and replace the tires and rim strips, spokes and nipples if needed. Plenty of good clincher tires out there compared to what there was when that bike was new.
 

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Shouldn't the cables have a housing where they go under the bottom of the crank?
If you have the $, and a new bike is available, I would just do that and ride. That bike is nice, but it's a project I wouldn't have time for. Unless you go through ever thing and fix it right, every ride is going to have an 'issue'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I get what you’re saying about a new bike, but…I’m 58. I did things on this bike that I will never, can never do again. That’s what I’m trying to tie into.

And, there’s this-

I have a friend who restored his dead father’s DeLorean. He told me, “Yes, my new Honda Civic is faster, quicker, handles better, gets a better mileage and is more reliable. Yet, when I fill up the tank of the Civic, people don’t come up and ask to take their picture with, like they do with the DeLorean.”
 

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I get what you’re saying about a new bike, but…I’m 58. I did things on this bike that I will never, can never do again. That’s what I’m trying to tie into.

And, there’s this-

I have a friend who restored his dead father’s DeLorean. He told me, “Yes, my new Honda Civic is faster, quicker, handles better, gets a better mileage and is more reliable. Yet, when I fill up the tank of the Civic, people don’t come up and ask to take their picture with, like they do with the DeLorean.”
That’s awesome! Duriel is otherwise completely right. That’s a really nice bike. But it’s a mechanical dinosaur. The DeLorean was a POS out of the factory. You could get a decent modern bike for around 1K. Ask yourself if this is a reasonable budget for rehab. I wouldn’t bother bringing this dino back form the dead.


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I get what you’re saying about a new bike, but…I’m 58. I did things on this bike that I will never, can never do again. That’s what I’m trying to tie into.

And, there’s this-

I have a friend who restored his dead father’s DeLorean. He told me, “Yes, my new Honda Civic is faster, quicker, handles better, gets a better mileage and is more reliable. Yet, when I fill up the tank of the Civic, people don’t come up and ask to take their picture with, like they do with the DeLorean.”
Exactly this. Imagine this scenario: Two people walk by a bicycle rack, filled with Treks, Specializeds, Felts, et al., and your Pinarello. If they remark on it, the most likely comment would be about your bike, and it'll be, "wow, cool old bike."

FWIW, I would do these things, were it mine, and I wanted to ride it:

*clean it, and lube up; not just hubs and BB, but seat post, bars, stem, brake pivots, everywhere that would've seen grease
*check for chain wear; if not bad, get a new chain, and if bad, leave on until new drivetrain bits are purchased
*swap brake pads for anything modern that fits (I'm not really picky about pads, there are lots of good options)
*put clipless pedals on it
*rebuild wheels with beefier rims and tires
*install new brake cables and housing, probably live with vintage levers/new hoods, though I vastly prefer aero levers
*install new derailleur cables
*install new stem and bars, if needed
*install new saddle

Obviously, this can get expensive, and many folks rightly point out that one can get a really nice-running modern bike that probably works better for the same amount of money, but does it ride better? Only you can answer that.

I also like the proven durability of the frame. Being a relatively heavier rider who rides a lot of traffic-pocked city streets, I like the fact that I wouldn't feel I'd have to baby the thing.

Whatever you do, be sure to post pics.
 
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I'm 72, I ride a 1 yo Canyon. I like riding more than wrenching. I will wrench on bikes and moto's though, just enough to keep them roll'in!
If your riding on crappy roads, your going to like riding on 28mm tires a lot better than 23's ...or 19's!!!
 

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It’s a super nice old frame. To restore it is going to be $$$$. To make it rideable for far less but still an investment. FWIW I built up a steel frame Merckx recently with Dura Ace 9000 for a little over $2,500.


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As to the freewheel: I assume you mean a classic SunTour freewheel (which were often quite good), but the newer SunRace freewheels are pretty much junk. In fact, you'd be hard-pressed to find anybody making a 'decent' freewheel today; the only bikes still using freewheels are pretty much dime-store bikes, and all the freewheels they use are heavy and have junky bearings.

What you have is pretty much a time capsule, an unrestored bike in decent shape. Finding correct rubber bits for the hoods will cost you (as will the covers for the crankset bolts), but you really should keep it as original as possible. There are people who rebuild classic freewheels, and a period Campagnolo 6-sp cluster would probably be what you need. Also, a set of GOOD tubulars (Vittoria Corsas or Challenge Paris Roubaix would work well), and the entire thing will need a good re-lubing of all bearings, plus a cleaning and detailing.

I've done a 'resto-mod' on a classic Trek from about the same era, only updating it to 8-sp components, but trying to keep as much of the classic structure together as possible. You could try that with yours, but I did that mostly because I started out with just a frame and a replacement fork, and when I did, components of roughly 10 years after the frame was made were more readily available.
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It’s a super nice old frame. To restore it is going to be $$$$. To make it rideable for far less but still an investment. FWIW I built up a steel frame Merckx recently with Dura Ace 9000 for a little over $2,500.


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It ain't gonna cost that much to get this bike up and running. Rebuilding the wheels is the big investment, $300 or so, and the rest maybe another $300, something like that for parts, and if the OP does his own wrenching it's $6-700 for a bike he enjoys and has a history with. And most of this money is maintenance, which would need to eventually be spent on a new bought bike anyway.
 

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It ain't gonna cost that much to get this bike up and running. Rebuilding the wheels is the big investment, $300 or so, and the rest maybe another $300, something like that for parts, and if the OP does his own wrenching it's $6-700 for a bike he enjoys and has a history with. And most of this money is maintenance, which would need to eventually be spent on a new bought bike anyway.
So, you figure 700-1,000 for rideable in good solid shape. Estimate for a restoration? You think it’s double?


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So, you figure 700-1,000 for rideable in good solid shape. Estimate for a restoration? You think it’s double?


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I didn't say restoration, I said up and running, and yes it's completely doable. That $700 will rebuild the wheels replace consumables(bar tape, brake pads, cables, brake hoods, tires & tubes, probably chain)clean and lube everything and possibly replace the seat, if the OP does the work hisownself. Maybe a few bucks more than seven but not a grand. Those 6 speed cassettes wore better than what we're used to these days, so should be fine.

A restoration would be well north of a grand and could result in a bike that wouldn't be as fun to ride out of fear of dinging it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I paid $1,100 for it, new. The most expensive racing bikes of the time (Columbus SLX, C-Record) cost $1,500. Early composite frames could go $2k. Still, friends thought I was paying a lot for a bike. My thinking was- it’s a lot if I ride it hundreds of miles per year, but not so much if I rode it thousands of miles per year, which I did.

I appreciate all the suggestions. Back in the day, I did my own mechanical work, and I saved the tools, but it has been a while. On this job, I’m leaning to doing a lot of it myself, to save money and to get it right. I don't have great bunches of time, so it will take a while.

I am now planning on cleaning the frame more than refinishing (will redo decals), replacing the brake hood and pads, looking for deals on drivetrain parts, and paying what it costs to get the wheels right.
 

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I paid $1,100 for it, new. The most expensive racing bikes of the time (Columbus SLX, C-Record) cost $1,500. Early composite frames could go $2k. Still, friends thought I was paying a lot for a bike. My thinking was- it’s a lot if I ride it hundreds of miles per year, but not so much if I rode it thousands of miles per year, which I did.

I appreciate all the suggestions. Back in the day, I did my own mechanical work, and I saved the tools, but it has been a while. On this job, I’m leaning to doing a lot of it myself, to save money and to get it right. I don't have great bunches of time, so it will take a while.

I am now planning on cleaning the frame more than refinishing (will redo decals), replacing the brake hood and pads, looking for deals on drivetrain parts, and paying what it costs to get the wheels right.
I know I will get a ton of criticism, but if you want to start riding again, and if it was me, I’d make this a restoration project and take my time, wasting money along the way while I actually ride a new/newer bike with indexed shifting and 11sp drivetrain. You don’t have the same legs you had when you were 20. A 50/34 11sp will be welcomed. I think it’s a wonderful endeavor to bring back a beauty of long ago. But it’s from long ago. If riding is your goal over wrenching, I’d make my plan around actually riding. Have you tried indexed shifting? I mean down tube shifting sucks. It’s probably the most important improvement in cycling in modernity. 2X 11sp is pretty nice as well.

I’m ready for the dog pile from RBR members who are from, like the 1960s who praise the down tube shifting bike. From a nostalgic perspective, from a rehab perspective, I get it. But if your goal is to ride, why wouldn’t you use a bike that makes that goal easier? As beautiful as this frame is, it’s a dinosaur with little functional value. It’s an amazing restoration project. But, as Velodog points out, if you do a true restoration do you want to do real serious miles on it? I wouldn’t.

Restoring is a great goal. Riding is a great goal. I just don’t think the two goals agree.


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