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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in the 2006 Orbea Lobular. The Orbea site makes it seem that the frame is all aluminum. Does anyone know if the 2006 Lobular has carbon seatstays or even a carbon rear triangle?

Also, it might be just marketing hype, but the lobular frame is supposed to dampen the vibration better than the regular aluminum frames. Is there any truth to this?

My goal is to minimize vibration - I don't mind a frame others might find "flexy" because I'm a lightweight and high cadence spinner, so I doubt I will flex the frame - and at the same time have a very light bike (so I'm ruling steel out). Should I go with the Orbea Lobular (partly b/c it looks so hot!) or am I better off with an all carbon frame?

Budget is in the $2000 - $3000 range. TIA!
 

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I am in the same boat and just posted two days ago. I am down to an Orbea Mitis (aluminum with carbon fork and rear triangle) and Specialized Roubaix Comp (all carbon). The Orbea had a faster and more responsive feel that brought more of a smile to my face, but I don't want to get into my first four hour ride and wish I had all carbon.

I would be interested in feedback as well.
 

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Orbea Mitis vs. Specialized Roubaix

The difference in responsiveness that you spoke of is probably more due to geometry and rider position than frame material. The Roubaix was not designed for responsiveness. It has a longer wheelbase, headtube, and more upright rider position than the Mitis. A better comparison, if you are looking for more responsiveness, would be the Tarmac. The Tarmac is more responsive (but not as comfortable) and available in the same general price range as similarly equipped Roubaix.

And no, I don't work for Specialized. It's just that these same bikes were on my radar, too, when I bought a new road bike.

Hope this was helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A dealer told me the Lobular has carbon seatstays and chainstays.

Yes, a test ride would seem to be in order, but I find that it's very difficult to differentiate bikes (unless they are wildly different in ride characteristics) in 15 minute test rides. Yet those minor differences (imperceptible in a brief time slice) may become very apparent over a longer ride.
 

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classiquesklassieker
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serpico7 said:
My goal is to minimize vibration - I don't mind a frame others might find "flexy" because I'm a lightweight and high cadence spinner, so I doubt I will flex the frame - and at the same time have a very light bike (so I'm ruling steel out). Should I go with the Orbea Lobular (partly b/c it looks so hot!) or am I better off with an all carbon frame?

Budget is in the $2000 - $3000 range. TIA!
If your goal is to get as much "comfort" as possible with little regard to performance, you're better off investing your money in:
* a good fit
* better clothing
* a bike with a wider tire
* a bike that's more oriented towards touring
Sounds to me that you are looking in the wrong place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
orange_julius said:
If your goal is to get as much "comfort" as possible with little regard to performance, you're better off investing your money in:
* a good fit
* better clothing
* a bike with a wider tire
* a bike that's more oriented towards touring
Sounds to me that you are looking in the wrong place.
OK, perhaps I misspoke. I'm not trying to maximize comfort at the expense of performance. If I wanted to do that, I'd just stick to my hardtail mtb with slicks (front shock, more upright geometry). Within the realm of performance-oriented (an ill-defined term, granted) road bikes, I'd like to maximize comfort. And for me, comfort is more about minimizing vibration to arms and shoulders than to my rear-end.
 

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classiquesklassieker
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serpico7 said:
OK, perhaps I misspoke. I'm not trying to maximize comfort at the expense of performance. If I wanted to do that, I'd just stick to my hardtail mtb with slicks (front shock, more upright geometry). Within the realm of performance-oriented (an ill-defined term, granted) road bikes, I'd like to maximize comfort. And for me, comfort is more about minimizing vibration to arms and shoulders than to my rear-end.
Nothing that I said suggested that you should use an MTB with slicks. But you'll be wise to broaden your horizon a bit, especially in terms of tire width. If I wasn't clear, all that I suggested are still firmly within the realm of a "road bike".

In fact, what most manufacturers call "performance comfort" or whatever term they want to use is exactly that, except that they charge you more for having that sticker on the bike.
 

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Defender of Freedom...
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It does have a carbon rear end...

The ride of the lobular is great, I loved mine. I've never ridden their full alloy frame so I can't speak to it's comfort but I can say that it has a very smooth ride but is definately "racey" in geo.

JR
 

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I own a 2004 Orbea Lobular

The bike is the same as the 2006 model. I really enjoy the bike but it is stiff and the ride is rough on bad roads. I have recently ridden a lot of all carbon frames. You will have to spend about $3.5 to $4K to get a better ride. Good luck.
 
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