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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This summer I am going to be traveling from San Diego to Los Angeles which is about a 100+ mile ride. This is going to excruciating because this is going to be the first time I am traveling more than 50 miles.

I recently been experimenting what to bring such as a backpack, nutritional bars, tons of water but haven't really settled in terms of weight and convenience. For example, if I bring a backpack, item storage can seem unlimited. I can bring almost anything (tubes, lock, pump, snacks, etc.) But when I hit >25 miles it becomes a annoying from the heat and sweat build up from my back and let alone the weight. (This take a toll on me when I climb hills) It almost wants me to abandon the pack or go back home. Im sorry but being uncomfortable in a long ride ruins the experience and joy. Also, I get stares from other bikers because I look like a "fred" in my jansport.

Without a backpack I enjoy much more because I do not have the heat buildup between my back and the pack. So I am able to "breathe" a bit more with less weight and longer endurance. However, if you are going to travel more you need to fuel yourself. Water, electrolytes (sport drinks), food, etc. seems like I need all that stuff to go longer but storage is not there. So far I can hold 2 water bottles on my bike, 4-5 powerbars, ipod, and phone. And I do not think it will last me more than 50 miles. If I get into a flat, what then?

So I am in a dilemma and I bet some people on this forum can give insight on what to bring. So please speak freely because I know some people are curious as well. Thanks!
 

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I would suggest you start by gradually increasing your ride mileage. Once you get up into the 75+ range, 100 isn't as hard as you think. I have a medium seat bag that I carry 2 tubes, 2 Co2, electrolytes, speed patches. I also use a Bento Bag that I can stuff several Goo's and bars into. Then there is always the pockets in the back of the jersey. But really if you carry some cash you should be able to replenish your food and water as you go.

So dump the pack and make use of other storage ideas. You will look back and wonder what all the fuss was about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Tort said:
I would suggest you start by gradually increasing your ride mileage. Once you get up into the 75+ range, 100 isn't as hard as you think. I have a medium seat bag that I carry 2 tubes, 2 Co2, electrolytes, speed patches. I also use a Bento Bag that I can stuff several Goo's and bars into. Then there is always the pockets in the back of the jersey. But really if you carry some cash you should be able to replenish your food and water as you go.

So dump the pack and make use of other storage ideas. You will look back and wonder what all the fuss was about.
Thanks for the advice. But when you said buying some stuff with cash, basically how? That means chaining up the bike where there is little to no place to put it. '
 

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100 miles isn't that far, particularly if you don't have to meet a schedule. You'll need a tire repair kit, a pump or enough CO2 cartridges, two jumbo water bottles, a cell phone, and cash. There's nothing that says you can't stop along the way to buy drinks and snacks, and you will need to refill your water more than once. Don't carry too much. Cash is a good substitute for most items, and a cell phone can get you out of any unexpected trouble.
 

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You should always have a tube, tire irons, patches, pump and tools with you. Every ride. I put those in a small under seat bag so I won't forget them, and to leave more room in my jersey pockets.

You need to plan your route better. I think it's significantly more than "about" 100 miles from SD to LA, and that distance depends on where in SD and where in LA you're going.
 

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You don't have to carry everything you'll need. Leave the backpack. Leave the ipod. Bring cash. You aren't going into the wilderness, so there will be stores where you can buy stuff. I've done countless centuries and longer rides and never carried all that much with me. Take 2 water bottles, a couple of powerbars, and a PB&J sandwich. Refill your bottles and buy everything else along the way.
 

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NotZeroSix said:
Thanks for the advice. But when you said buying some stuff with cash, basically how? That means chaining up the bike where there is little to no place to put it. '
For a quick run into a convenience store or gas station you don't always need to lock up the bike, if you can leave it somewhere visible. But it eases the mind a bit if you don't have to keep a constant eye on the bike, so I always carry a very small, light cable lock in the seat bag. It wouldn't stop a serious thief, obviously, but it's plenty secure to allow you to run into a store or a bathroom for 10 minutes if you leave the bike in place in plain view.

And I second all the advice given here about not carrying too much. A few energy bars and gels in the pockets, 2 large water bottles on the bike, and in the seat bag a spare tube, patch kit, multi-tool. A rag and a pair of latex or nitrile gloves are nice so you don't get too dirty if you have to make repairs. Pump, of course, and CO2 if that's what you use.

For a 100-mile ride you'll need to eat quite a lot more than you're accustomed to eating on shorter rides, and drink a lot, too.
 

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Done that ride many times. First thing, check the wind! Normally it is coming from the North. First time I did the ride, it was from the South the entire time. Nearly killed me. Something to consider. You can always take the Amtrack TO LA and then ride back to SD.

Walking into a convenience store to grab something quick, you'll be fine. Use common sense.

The last time I did the ride, I had my CC, cell phone, 4 gel packs, and some cash in my pockets. Saddle bag had 2 tubes, CO2, levers, and my standard emergency stuff.
 

· "El Bwana"
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While on vacation I did the ride from San Clemente to San Diego. There is water available at San Onofre State Beach as well as the guard shacks at Camp Pendleton. Remember to bring ID to get on the base. If you have a military ID, you can buy at the commissary or PX; otherwise, civilians can't purchase there.
 

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I would hate to leave my bike out of eyesight for even one second. I would ask at the store if I could wheel it in. Many will say yes, some will say no. If no, try another store. You might have better luck at gas stations for this. If it is a large, anonymous, chain-type place and I am desperate, I might just wheel it in straight away, and beg forgiveness rather than asking permission. Another approach is to ride with a friend - this is a pretty good idea for long rides away from home anyway.
 

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Time to do some research into on-bike storage and pick some things that work for you.

1) seat bag (will hold flat and basic repair items)

2) Seat and/or bar mounted bottle cages for added water capacity (or plan on pulling into a gas station somewhere along the way once or twice, which really should not be an issue at all)

3) Stuff jersey pockets with cell, cash, choice of food. (they hold more than you think!)

You can go just like this and be fine. OR

4) Look into frame bags (or a rack and small trunk bag if your bike has rack mounts).
This is largely unnecessary for ~100 mile rides, but if it makes you more comfortable to have the piece of mind of carrying more then perhaps it's a good solution.

Something like one of these: http://www.epicdesignsalaska.com/?page_id=4

Or maybe just a large Bento box: http://triathlon-gear.trisports.com/sport/Bento Box Large

Or even a handlebar bag.

Lots of options.
 

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Someone put this advice on this forum in lieu of locking bike.

- Put your chain on the smallest ring up front and largest in back. If someone is trying to RIDE it away, and aren't familiar with the gearing of a modern road bike, they won't get far. Plus if you have clipless pedals that will make it harder.

I know there are other options than just riding it away, but it would be a common method I suppose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the advice! I agree, there were some points being mentioned that I wouldnt have thought about. Once again, thanks!

However, everyone suggested that I be accompanied by a friend while on the tour. Unfortunately all my friends dont have access to a "good" road bike and doesnt seem like the dedication is in their hearts to travel so vast. So I going to have to go solo on this one. As for packs on the bike, I dont like the idea of it. It takes away the "sporty" look of them and I want my bike low profile when it comes to accessories. Just simple and clean. But there seems to be no other choice so I looked at http://www.specialized.com/zz/en/bc/SBCEqProduct.jsp?spid=41642&menuItemId=9311&eid=5133 Its not to big or heavy. But it can carry only my emergency stuff (phone, patches, tubes, lights). Which doesnt seem much but seems perfect than storing it in my jersey pockets.

So yeah, i am just going to use the mini-wedge bag for maintenance/emergency like stated above. My left Jersey pocket will hold debit card, cash, and my ID; Middle Jersey pocket will hold bike pump; And Right Jersey pocket will hold 2-5 powerbars. Sounds good?

One last important thing that always get me is SUNSCREEN. Where do I put it? I have to protect myself from the sun to avoid sunburns or better yet, melanoma. (Maybe I am just going to look if theres a mini travel size and store it in my middle pocket jersey.)
 

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Times like this is good to have a riding buddy. When I need to carry extra, I bring a fanny/waist pack. Depending on size, is good for tubes, food, tools and camera. You an also scout the route and make note of stores that would be spaced to where you think you'll want to take a break. On regularly used bike routes, there are usually sufficient outdoor stops where leaving your bike unattended isn't a problem. As in food shops where they have an outdoor window for ordering...like many beach areas.
 
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