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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey everyone.

I have a 2008 Specialized Sirrus and I am looking to replace the crankset with another 3 ring, also looking to replace the bottom bracket. The problem is that I have no idea what I'm doing and I want to make sure I order the right parts so they fit without me needing to return them.

I was looking at the Shimano M361 175 48/38/28 and the Dura-Ace SM-BB9000. All I know off hand is that my bike currently has an HG-50 rear cassette, Sora rear derailleur, T301 front derailleur, and the bottom bracket looks to be 68*113. But I have no clue where to go beyond that. Will the products I mentioned would work without issue or if I would need something else?

Sorry for such an abrupt first post, but I'm really just wanting to get all this taken care of so I can get riding ASAP. Thanks for your help!!!


Edited to add a picture of current chainring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
IMPORTANT NOTE-

I have very unfortunately packed on quite a bit of weight in the past year and a half, and I am wanting components that can take at least one year of serious abuse from me riding it so often to lose as much weight as I can. This is why I was wanting to get something of decent quality as opposed to just getting simple components.

Long story short (for anyone that cares)-

In 2012, I was found to have an extremely rare and extremely lethal congenital heart defect that kills on the spot, no chances of survival without immediate intervention. So my doctor put a defibrillator in my chest. It is set to deliver a shock... which hurts really bad and will cause you to lose consciousness... if my heart rate goes above 180bpm, which is as high as is considered safe with this condition. So I became incredibly paranoid about issues it could all bring while cycling and that sent me into a really deep depression. But I need to work towards getting over this fear so I can get healthier. I'm ready to jump back on this demon pig. So the stronger/less likely something is to break due to excess weight and strain, the better.
 

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The crankset you are looking at requires a square taper bottom bracket, thus the Dura-Ace bottom bracket will NOT work. You will need a square taper bottom bracket.

The parts you are looking for are not particularly expensive. Given you have no experience, I would recommend you take it to a bike shop and just have them inspect what you have and replace it if necessary.
 

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You've not stated WHY you want to replace your crankset and BB, but if it's a wear issue, there's a good chance that your chain and/or cassette are also worn out.

Most people get through several chains and cassettes before having to replace chainrings.

It's unusual that you want to pair a high-end DA BB with a low-end crank, but as BC stated, that BB Is not compatible with square-taper cranks. Moving up the scale to Octalink cranks is feasible, but probably not cost-effective on that bike.

If I was in your shoes, If you really need/want the new crankset, then simply pair it with a new Shimano UN55 bottom bracket (68mm/113mm) and you're done.

As stated, if you don't have the tools to check for chain/cassette/chainring wear and to remove/replace these and a bottom-bracket, you're probably better off letting an LBS take care of it for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I didn't really think it would be necessary to say why, but here it is. I did have a new cassette put on a while ago as well as a new chain. I was wanting to simply get the parts myself and then take it to the bike shop to have it all done so as to save a little bit of money. That's why I posted the question here instead of going straight to the bike shop. Tire Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle tire Bicycle part Automotive tire
 

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Are you having any problems with shifting? If not, I would leave it alone and just ride it.

If you do have problems with shifting or jumping (ghost shifting), then it may be worn. If so, I would let your LBS handle everything as you won't save a lot by buying parts online and taking them to your LBS.

Now if you are doing the work yourself, then you would save money. Yes, you will need to stay with a square taper BB system. If you don't care about weight, you can actually get a very inexpensive, but well made crankset made by Sugino:

Sugino Impel 158X 28 38 48x170mm Crank SQT 8sp Silver Black | eBay

It is inexpensive, because it is heavy and all steel. For your purpose, it will serve you fine. Don't worry that it is marketed as "8-speed". It will work fine for both 8 and 9 speed systems.
 

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I didn't really think it would be necessary to say why.... View attachment 312946
Your reasoning is perfectly fine, but I was asking more from the context of need-to vs. want-to i.e. as Lombard said, are you having problems with shifting, or chain jumping, or is it simply a matter of you wanting the shiny, new cranks?

The LBS that did your chain/cassette would have likely checked your rings and checked if the BB was noisy and advised if anything needed to be replaced. Also, unless you're changing system (square-taper, bb30 etc.) replacing cranks doesn't necessitate a BB replacement.

Your chainrings don't look so bad in the pic, plus in the interest of saving $, you can simply replace any worn rings, instead of the cranks and rings. From a longevity pov, steel rings, though heavier, will outlast aluminum. Likely cheaper too.

Ride your bike, enjoy it, and hopefully you'll get the desired results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am having issues with shifting. That's why I took it in last time and they completely failed to notice how bad my cassette was. I don't have a picture of it, but it was very rough. So when I took it back and told them I was still having issues, they noticed it and replaced it. It's not as bad as it used to be, but I also get a clicking noise. They made mention of the chainring and said it would be a good idea to replace it in the future, possibly with a new crankset if I was looking for a little bit of an upgrade, but I wasn't told what kind. Basically, because I don't have a nice bike, I am not taken seriously and it is very frustrating. I have half a million dollars worth of medical equipment and treatment buried in my chest and I just want to ride to get my mind off of it, but every tine I try, I get these problems and it's very discouraging. I'm willing to spend extra money on parts by ordering things to take with me to have installed as opposed to them supplying the parts because of the reason I mentioned where I said they don't take my interest seriously and basically brush me out of the shop to make room for people with higher dollar bikes.

I enjoy going for rides more than almost anything else, and I mean that in the most literal sense. But trying to keep up with everything is such a headache that it really kills my interest in it.
 

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I am having issues with shifting. That's why I took it in last time and they completely failed to notice how bad my cassette was. I don't have a picture of it, but it was very rough. So when I took it back and told them I was still having issues, they noticed it and replaced it. It's not as bad as it used to be, but I also get a clicking noise. They made mention of the chainring and said it would be a good idea to replace it in the future, possibly with a new crankset if I was looking for a little bit of an upgrade, but I wasn't told what kind. Basically, because I don't have a nice bike, I am not taken seriously and it is very frustrating. I have half a million dollars worth of medical equipment and treatment buried in my chest and I just want to ride to get my mind off of it, but every tine I try, I get these problems and it's very discouraging. I'm willing to spend extra money on parts by ordering things to take with me to have installed as opposed to them supplying the parts because of the reason I mentioned where I said they don't take my interest seriously and basically brush me out of the shop to make room for people with higher dollar bikes.

I enjoy going for rides more than almost anything else, and I mean that in the most literal sense. But trying to keep up with everything is such a headache that it really kills my interest in it.
If your LBS isn't taking you seriously, then you need to find a different LBS. Taking them the parts is a waste of time. They are NOT worth your business.

Either that, or get some tools and learn to do the work yourself. With the right tools, some mechanical inclination and some good books on bike repair, it isn't that difficult. I know it's probably more than you were thinking about, but it is rewarding when you can be self sufficient.

The clicking you are hearing may very well be a worn BB. Cheap BBs are often put on hybrid bikes. Yours is probably one with a cheap cartridge bearing. As another poster on this thread mentioned, a good one to get is the Shimano UN55. That one has a real steel bearing in it. If you use this one, you will never change your BB again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You know what's weird? I can fix pretty much anything, and I do, but I've always been a train wreck when working on bikes. No issue rebuilding the engine in an Audi, but I swear I could set fire to a bike by taking a wheel off. I work on computers, having built many ultra-high end systems when I worked at a computer shop... I have experience in working with watches starting with the basic Fossil watch with a quartz movement all the way to Baume & Mercier automatic movements................... I make things worse by trying to work on my bike. So I just came to terms with it and decided to let other people work on it. I will be going to another shop... on the total opposite side of town, but if they're less judgmental, then I think it will be worth it.
 

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I am having issues with shifting. That's why I took it in last time and they completely failed to notice how bad my cassette was. I don't have a picture of it, but it was very rough. So when I took it back and told them I was still having issues, they noticed it and replaced it. It's not as bad as it used to be, but I also get a clicking noise...

I enjoy going for rides more than almost anything else, and I mean that in the most literal sense. But trying to keep up with everything is such a headache that it really kills my interest in it.
Get a decent bike repair manual and read it. Bikes are not like cars. If they are used frequently, you need to lube the chain, lube the pivot points on the derailleurs, clean the brake rims, etc every so often. Occasionally the shift system may need adjustments.

You may need new shift cables. Old cables can give inconsistent shifting results. If the shift system is not dead on, it can make noise. Especially in the back. Dry chains also are more noisy.

The noise in the drive system - front or rear?
Grab both crank arms and try to move back and forth (90 degrees from axis of rotation). Is there any play? There should be zero, if there is any, it's worn. A little may be tolerable, a lot is worn out.
I agree, find a new bike shop. Call ahead and talk to the service department, also look at online reviews before going in.
If you expect to ride this a LOT, you may need a comprehensive overhaul, versus a band-aid approach. You'll need to work with a decent and understanding mechanic to accomplish this.
On bringing in your own parts - ask up front if they allow it. Some may, likely many others won't.
 

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FWIW, based on what you've offered here, I agree that you should find another shop. That clicking you hear could be anything from a worn BB to a simple cable adjustment. A good/ reputable shop will discuss the symptoms with you, identify any problems and tell you options to adjust, repair or replace parts.

As far as working on bikes, I also agree that there are numerous benefits in doing so, but not everyone is good at everything. And bikes take a certain amount of finesse , at times.

In this instance, I'd suggest holding off on buying specialized tools for something you may only replace once. Have the LBS do that. But in the future, consider "dabbling" with some simpler aspects of bike maintenance.

Lastly, kudos to you for your efforts to improve overall fitness. Don't let a sub par LBS or niggling bike issues dissuade you. Stay on track, get this issue sorted and enjoy your rides!
 

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You may need new shift cables. Old cables can give inconsistent shifting results. If the shift system is not dead on, it can make noise. Especially in the back. Dry chains also are more noisy.

Very good point here. Some of the less expensive galvanized cables oxidize over time. Here is a quick check you can do. Run each of your cables in between your thumb and finger. Does it feel smooth or rough. If it is rough, it can bind inside your housings. This will cause poor shifting more often than just about anything else.

Are there any bike clubs in your area that cater to recreational riding? If so, joining and riding with others of your level can be of great value. Talking to others who have been in the sport for awhile, you will find out which shops are good and which aren't. It sounds like you were unlucky enough to find one of those elitist shops that doesn't want to spend time with you unless you have a fancy $6K+ bike.
 

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You know what's weird? I can fix pretty much anything, and I do, but I've always been a train wreck when working on bikes. No issue rebuilding the engine in an Audi, but I swear I could set fire to a bike by taking a wheel off.
I would pay to see this... :D. Joking aside, we actually have a lot in common, right down to the wrenching on cars, computers and a phantom shifting bike. My issue was due to cables. Yes, my cassette and crank was also very well worn BUT replacing the shift cables did resolve my shifting issues.

With cycling maintenance, it took me a while to get used to being patient and fine tuning. It took me several days trying to get my used mountain bike to shift smoothly. Despite all of the adjustments I tried to make to it, turns out it had a bent derailleur hanger on the back. After that was straightened, it took very little effort to get it dialed in and indexed correctly.

Depending on where you live, some cities have bike co-ops with tools, bike stands and people that can provide advice and assistance. Not only did that help me build up my skills, but I also get to use bike tools that I could not justify purchasing due to how little I will actually use them such as a headset press or a various alignment tools.
 

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Looking at the pictures, there are some serious chips in the chainring teeth. I'm guessing that some of those teeth are probably bent as well (impossible to tell from this angle).

I think the advice being given here is sound. Find a better bike shop and take it to them.. I'd just expect to pay to replace the chainrings and cables at a minimum, and if the BB if not healthy, have that done at the same time.

The parts are not likely to be expensive, but labor could be. I'd just have the shop source the parts. That way, you don't have to risk getting the wrong thing(s) and having to deal with returns, etc... If they order them, you'll get the parts you need.
 

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Incorrect, unless by serious chips you mean the tooth shaping done during manufacture to facilitate shifting.
^^^This^^^ If you look carefully, the teeth that look "worn down" have a consistent pattern with the pins and ramps behind them. These help with smooth upshifts.
 

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The teeth 4 and 5 (from left) likely hit something, but no reason to replace the chainring. Usually a few strokes with a fine file to smooth out the burr is all that needs. A badly worn chainring looks like this, asymmetric, or hooked one way.


 

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