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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bike is 2 weeks old and it rides great. I have two issues, however, with the brakes.

1. The front brake pads do not fully return to the open position and the pads stay very close to the rim.
I trued the rims with the spoke wrench and they are very true. But even a slight (less than a 1mm) bulge will touch the pad on one side. I tried to adjust the screw thingy above the brakes and I tried changing the length of the brake wire where it clamps.

2. The front and back brakes make scraping noise when I apply brakes.
Not a squeal or sqeak but scraping noises. I took the wheel off and examined the pads and they had tiny metal particles embeded in them which seemed to have come from the rim.

What should I do?:confused:
 

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1 One of two things- Most likely the brake housing is not fully seated in the brake lever. It involves unwrapping the bar tape and making sure the housing is fully seated in the lever. The other issue could be the cable is snagging on the housing.

2. Once pads pickup bits of metal, I've never had luck using the existing pads. I've always replace the pads...You can try digging out the metal with a knife.
 

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Clean the pads and rims. A little degreaser and a scrubber sponge will do the trick. That'll get rid of the metal particles. You might want to consider better pads, such as CoolStops.

What kind of brake calipers do you have? Standard road brakes with a side pull, or are they cantis or V-brakes?

If standard road brakes, they may have been set up so that the adjustmant screw is all the way at the loose end, and you can only turn it in the direction that will tighten the brakes. If that's the case, you'll need a hex/allen wrench to loosen the cable at the cable nut and let the tinyest bit of cable out to get the brakes to open. Another option is to simply open the lever on the side of the brake that opens the brakes so that you can get the tire past the brake pads when you take the wheel off. I ride with one of those about half way open on my bike, and it works fine.

As for the brakes not opening all the way, you should probably put a little grease, lube or even WD40 in the pivot points. Depending on the exact brakes you have, there may also be a small phillips screw that adjusts the opening tension, which you could tighten to increase the opening tension. But my first suggestion is to take the wheel off the bike, simply spray some WD40 or drip some lube in the pivots and squeeze/release the brake s bunch of times (using your hand to grab and squeeze the brake pads together as opposed to pulling the brake lever, so that they close more than they would with the brake lever.

Another issue could be a sticking brake cable. But since the bike is brand new, that *shouldn't* be an issue unless you are leaving it out in the rain.

One more thing... the bike is only 2 weeks old? If you bought it from a decent bike shop, take it back to them and tell them to fix both issues. They should do that without question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the suggestions. I picked out the metal particles and the sound came back after 5 minutes. So I looked at them again and the metal particles were back.

The bike shop will do the 30-day check/tune up. Whatelse should I make sure that they look over? My shifters seem to work fine.
 

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Simple check

edhchoe said:
The front brake pads do not fully return to the open position and the pads stay very close to the rim.
Disconnect the cable from the brakes. If they spring open easily, then you have a cable/casing problem. If the brakes open slowly or don't fully open, then the pivots need lube or adjustment.
 

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I agree with the above...take it back to the shop you bought it. Most new bikes have a couple of free tunes ups. You might ask them to show you what needs to be done to your bike and how to do it.

You might consider buying a book about bike maintenance in the future. As time passes you will learn how to do most of the work on your bike.
 
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