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First off I am new to the sport, I got my first bike (Giant OCR) last Saturday and have taken it out twice now, nothing long but enough to get a feel for the sport. I have noticed that when I am shifting through the gears my chain is hitting the front derailleur (mainly when I am in the extremes like either smallest cogs or both largest cogs) but it also dose it when I am in the middle front gear. Is this normal or is this something I should talk to my LBS about, or can I fix it myself?
When I test road it at my LBS it was fine.
Thanks, I think I will have a lot more questions.
 

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Cross chaining (big/big or little/little) is NEVER recommended, especially for a triple. It puts the chain at extreme angles and can snap the rear derailleur (especially when in big/big). Regarding being in the middle ring, you should be able to go through all the cogs will none (or very little) rubbing when in the big cog or the little cog. Ask your LBS to adjust the front derailleur...they can be tricky to get right.
 

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depending on what shifters you have you may have a trim click to get rid of this rubbing in the middle ring, everything above sora should have this, to use it you shift up into the middle ring and when the chain is rubbing on the inside of the front derailleur you can give it a half click down and the rubbing should go away. idk how well i explained that but you LBS should also be able to show you how to use this.
 

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Like MCF said, it's not a problem with bike- it's a problem with the rider :) Seriously, I've never heard of a dérailleur snapping off (not saying it couldn't happen) but you do put stress on all the parts when you cross chain. Since you're new, and it wouldn't take you long to figure out with just a few more rides, but I'll say it anyhow, there is a tremendous amount of overlap in the gearing. To use the simple example of a double front (instead of your triple) when you get to big/big and find it too hard to pedal, if you make the next 'logical' shift to small/small you'll find you're in a much higher (harder) gear than you were, so you should have come off that big front chain ring earlier and changed the rear as well.

You might find it easier to think of your front chain rings as 'ranges' in a transmission. Big is for downhill and really flat ground. Middle is for mild uphills. Small is for killer hills. Your rear cassette gears are for fine tuning those ranges. So, if you're on the middle chain ring, as soon as you notice the hill is starting to get really steep you should drop to the small chain ring before you get to the biggest gear on the rear cassette even though, as MCF said, there will probably be very little, if any, rubbing on the middle gear.

Enjoy the sport.
 
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