Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just got a giant defy to use as an endurance/winter bike over my other bike (spesh allez) which has more racy geometry.
The defy has a much shorter reach than my other bike (4cm less) and the bars are slightly higher as well. (90mm stem with 2 spacers below)
I have cycled 65 miles with relatively little pain in my neck on my nice bike so expected the giant to be even comfier. I have so far done 2 rides of around 25 miles and keep getting on and off neck pain. I am wondering if the position is too relaxed (??) or the shifters are a different shape leading to the pain going up to my neck.
The giant has sora shifters and my other bike has much more comfy 105 shifters.
any suggestions?
 

·
Cycling Addict
Joined
·
5,170 Posts
You have not given enough information about the type and location of the pain for us to give even a rudimentary diagnosis. With the more upright riding position you are not needing to crane your neck up as much in order to see up the road so it should not be inducing pain.

Has it been raining on those rides with the Defy, forcing you to ride with a brimmed cap or visored helmet and thus having to crane your neck even more to see up the road.

Have you been doing something else off the bike that could be causing this? I recently was experiencing extreme neck stiffness and pain and just yesterday realized that at work I was sitting in my desk chair angled away from the computer and was turning my head to work on it. It is going to take a while with my sitting position correctly oriented in order to get rid of the pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yea sorry didnt really go into much detail
The pain is around the back of my neck and tops of shoulders, gets better when i move my shoulders and goes away as soon as i stop or get off the bike
I have been riding the defy as i would ride any other bike with the same helmet and no visor or anything. And i have also riden the Allez a fair distance in between my rides on the defy and it doesnt give me any pain.
 

·
Burnum Upus Quadricepus
Joined
·
2,017 Posts
Not to put too fine a point on it, but it's not the marketing jargon or what the decals say that makes a bike comfortable. It is 100% the fit.

There's something wrong with the fit of your Defy. Your Allez simply fits better.

So, get out a measuring tape, a level, a plumb bob (or make one with a weighted string) and a pencil. You'll also need someone or something to hold the bike upright.

First measure the Allez. Measure the saddle height from the center of the BB to the middle of the seatpost clamp. Drop your plumb bob from the nose of the saddle, then measure from the string to the middle of the BB.

Next, lay your level across the saddle out to the bars, and measure the saddle to bars drop (or height). Finally, measure from the saddle nose to the bars, or I prefer right to the tips of the hoods.

When you perform the same measurements on the Defy, you'll find something is really off.

Now, in the same order, saddle height, saddle setback, saddle-to-bar drop, reach from saddle to bars (or hoods), replicate the measurements from the Allez on the Defy.

For fine tuning, set the saddle angle, the bar angle and rotation of the hoods around the bars to be the same.

Now you have the same fit on the Defy as the Allez. No matter what's causing your pain, the pain should be gone. But you bought the Defy to gain a more upright position than on the Allez. So...

Starting from this known comfortable position, now you can experiment with moving the bars up and/or back to a more upright position knowing that if you get it wrong, you have the measurements to start all over again.

And if you can't quite figure it out for yourself, you'll have all the gory details anyone on teh interwebz would ever need to point you in the right direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
Try to change the position to match your other bike.
I noticed something similar: on one bike my handlebar was 5mm higher than on my "usual" bike.
The former gave me some neck pain, the latter doesn't -- so I lowered the handlebar and the pain went away.
 

·
Forever a Student
Joined
·
4,963 Posts
I've said it before, this whole "endurance" category is a sham.

Sitting upright is not more comfortable and not preferable for longer distance riding. It's the exact opposite actually.

When you have multiple bikes, they should be set up exactly the same.

My advice is to get rid of the "endurance" bike and ride the bike that's setup properly for you that is comfortable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,658 Posts
There's a fine line between relaxed and cramped. Sounds like you crossed it.
More upright ain't necessarily more better. Being more relaxed then flat out speed position is okay (that's why people don't ride in the drops or with drastically bent elbows to get low all the time) but you can definitely go to far with that.

For example my road bike is extremely aggressive and I ride long distances all the time and the last time I rented a hybrid on vacation just to to tool around on all day it felt like a torture devise after a few hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've just done the measurements for my allez and then the defy- what i found is the defy has the same handlebar height as the allez (in relation to saddle height), but the reach is 40mm shorter from saddle tip to the hoods! I have since adjusted the saddle height slightly and tilted it back slightly as I felt I was sliping forward on it whilst riding. Also I've angled the hoods up slightly to match my allez so hopefully those few slight adjustments should make for a better ride. I think i may try a longer stem if necessary to get a slightly longer reach as 40mm difference is quite alot!
As for the 'endurance' thing, what a load of bollocks. the defy has a lower front end than the allez which is marketed as a 'race' bike.
Thanks for the suggestions so far
 

·
Los Barriles, BCS, Mexico
Joined
·
1,456 Posts
It sounds like your cockpit is too short, making you 'scrunch' your shoulders and neck which would cause that warm burning sensation right at the junction of your shoulders and neck. If it were me, I'd try a longer stem. Perhaps you could borrow one to see if that may help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
A picture would help. Assuming your saddle is in the right position, your stem may be too short as mentioned. The angle of your hoods also matter a lot. Try moving them at a lower angle in ordermto loosen up your arms.
 

·
Cycling Addict
Joined
·
5,170 Posts
I think that Giant missed the mark with the Defy. If the handlebar position isn't any higher than a regular road bike, then making them closer to the saddle only puts you into a weird position. A true "endurance bike" (which position I like after forty years of road bikes) will have the bars both higher and a little closer (not a lot closer like that Defy).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think that Giant missed the mark with the Defy. If the handlebar position isn't any higher than a regular road bike, then making them closer to the saddle only puts you into a weird position. A true "endurance bike" (which position I like after forty years of road bikes) will have the bars both higher and a little closer (not a lot closer like that Defy).
I agree, the so called taller head tube is only really compared to traditional geometry 'race' machines. The actual reach is not overly shorter than anything more racy, but they fit a short stem so that reduces it significantly
The bars will go up higher although you'd be at the top of the steerer with lots of spacers underneath which i cant help but thinking is a waste of space where a head tube could have been extended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ok so I decided to slam the stem (lowered by about 3cm) and tilt the hoods up slightly. Also have adjusted the saddle back slightly.
I went on a short but quick ride and felt very comfortable. Although I need to test it on a longer ride it seems I am going in the right direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
I have since adjusted the saddle height slightly and tilted it back slightly as I felt I was sliping forward on it whilst riding.
This may be a telling piece of information. One of the effects of having the nose of the saddle tilted down is that you end up putting more weight on your hands to hold yourself in position. This extra strain can move up the shoulders and base of your neck where you say you feel it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
I'm thankful for the popularity of endurance bikes. The marketing is bunk of course, but the result is that there are more frames that fit me now. I have long legs and a short torso. On a traditional frame most people my height would be riding a 58cm but now I can size down to a 56cm, getting me the reach I need while still maintaining a stack height that doesn't call for massive saddle to bar differential.

I say praise be to the "Endurance Bike"!! Long may it live!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,744 Posts
I think everything is a shot in the dark, so, the first thing I would suggest is changing wheel sets with your other bike. I still own a set of Mavic R-sys wheels that are likely the harshest riding wheels ever put on a bike. They caused the kind of pain you are describing even though I ran them tubeless with relatively low pressure.

Clearly a shot in the dark--but free!
I have just got a giant defy to use as an endurance/winter bike over my other bike (spesh allez) which has more racy geometry.
The defy has a much shorter reach than my other bike (4cm less) and the bars are slightly higher as well. (90mm stem with 2 spacers below)
I have cycled 65 miles with relatively little pain in my neck on my nice bike so expected the giant to be even comfier. I have so far done 2 rides of around 25 miles and keep getting on and off neck pain. I am wondering if the position is too relaxed (??) or the shifters are a different shape leading to the pain going up to my neck.
The giant has sora shifters and my other bike has much more comfy 105 shifters.
any suggestions?
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top