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Hi,

I've really gotten burned out of health clubs and gyms the past twelve months. With summer here I haven't been to mine in two or three months. Winter approaches though and I figure I have about ten weeks of rideable weather left.

So am wondering how effective a home based workout can be. The basement has space for the bike and trainer. A mat and the excercise ball also fits. I can probably rig a chin up bar somewhere, too. I'd rather not go to the expense of buying a Bowflex type thing or a full blown set of barbells and bench as I'll probably be tired of the basement by Spring.

So how effective is a "minimalist" home workout area for you? Can you do anything effective beyond some Pilates type moves without investing in lots of equipment?

I'm 46 and understand I'll never look like Swarzenneger, but want to minimize losing what I've gained the past summer.

Mike
 

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P90x may be a good fit for you, not as motivational as a personel trainer but for home workouts on a budget you cant go wrong. These are hard core workouts that will bring your fitness up a few levels, I have done the workouts the past 2 off seasons with great results loosing weight, building strength and muscle. The workouts combine cardio,pilates,yoga,plyometrics,martial arts,strength and core workouts. The different workouts keep it interesting, and the intensity and difficulty keep it challenging. I use stretch cords because they are convient and cheap, I dont need freeweights to get a good workout, most of the moves are bodyweight anyway,pushups,chairdips,pullups,etc.
 

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What manymiles said. Unless you're looking for bulk and brute strength where you really need to weights there's no reason you can't stay in decent shape with home work outs. Though if you're burnt out from the gym I can't imagine you'll find your basement any more exciting.
 

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This is what I have been doing for the last 3 years...

I got tired of the gym since i was only using it for weights, lightweights at that, and I had a trainer at home....

So my wife and I both cancelled our memberships and started working out at home. We bought an exercise ball, a couple fit disks and some dumbells. We already both had trainers for the bikes so that wasn't a problem. We have now added a chin-up bar to round out the workouts.

We find that we are able to keep fit over the winter and focus more on cycling specific training....ie...Trainer! Last winter we started working with a coach and actually made some gains over the winter and are actually looking forward to this winter!

Like the poster above stated, gyms are good if you are trying to build bulk and/or need the motivation to workout. As cyclists bulk is not soemthing we want, so if you can motivate yourself the home gym based workout is perfect.
 

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There are many advantages of working out at home, motivation is not one of them,for me anyway! I like the fact I dont have to commute to the gym,dont have to wait for equipment, dont get sick from all the germs,gym fees,contracts,broke equipment, closed for holidays,etc. I dont deal with any of that now. Now that Im 44 I realize strength training isnt just about specific muscle groups, for me its about a complete workout in the shortest amount of time to retain as much muscle as I get older, also to prevent muscle imbalances. For me P90x gets that accomplished.
 

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Mike, last winter I managed to have a productive "basement" season and stay sane by approaching it as a 90 day block Dec-Jan-Feb. Prior to getting started I chose three different types of workouts/sessions (low intensity endurance, high intensity interval and cross training) plus progammed rest days. I then figured out the frequncy of each that I wanted to do in that 90 day period. I went so far as to mount a large numbered count down chart for each workout on the basement beam that I'd mark off at the end of each session. When you see progress on the chart it's a mental boost and good indoor training seems to me to be mainly a battle between the ears . That's why approaching it as a season with a set number of workouts helps. (example maybe 20 interval sessions, 20 cross training and 20 endurance workouts, along with 30 programmed rest days - that's 90 days total that gets you to the end of February in good condition, which is the goal) .
 

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I set up a home gym years ago and haven't looked back, go for it! Craigslist and play-it-again type stores are great places to find used equipment, and there are always sales around XMAS and new-years at the big-box stores. I also think you are 4-6 weeks short on your rideable weather estimate, although by late October I'm tired of riding anyway and thinking about XC skis...
 

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Adjustable bench and a set of powerblock adjustable dumbbells, your pull up bar and you're good to go. Throw in some plyometrics (check out Insanity) too if you want.

Gene
 

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mikefm101So how effective is a "minimalist" home workout area for you? Can you do anything effective beyond some Pilates type moves without investing in lots of equipment? [/QUOTE said:
Just be sure to add a good fan or two so you don't overheat (unless you somehow think that exercising in a sauna is a good idea) and a sound system or TV to watch when you're on the bike.
 

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I'm a fellow new englander and I have to disagree with every single person here. Stay at the gym. Keep a trainer and rollers at home. Make sure your gym has spin classes and yoga.
I pay 25 a month at the local Y. That 25 bucks gets me 3 pools, sauna, steam room, massuese (nominal fee), nutrionists, tons of aerobics classes including spin and yoga, treadmills, weights, babysitting basically everything I could ever ask for. Your not gonna fit all that in your basement. Keep the trainer and rollers in the basement and definitely make sure they get heavy usage all winter.
ime. The biggest challenge in the winter is motivation. I've found that having a wide variety of options keeps me from getting mentally burned out. a lot of gyms around here offer the essentials for 10 bucks a month. I spend more than that on fluids in a week of training! Lol. (I did not actually do the math on that so please do not hold me accountable for that statement.)
 

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Couple of thoughts... Working out in gyms has always driven me kind of nuts. I like to be outside so bike/hike in summer (and some waterski, swimming, etc.). X-Country ski in winter (and some downhill, snowshoe, etc.). I do ride rollers during the winter, but only once or twice a week at most except during xition season when it's too slushy outside to do much of anything.

Many of the best in-shape over-45's I know don't do any weight/machine workouts. They do various pushups, situps, and isometrics (along with biking, running, skiing,..). These don't require much in the way of space or equipment (but then, you loose the fun of buying and having the equipment).
 

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manymiles said:
P90x may be a good fit for you, not as motivational as a personel trainer but for home workouts on a budget you cant go wrong. These are hard core workouts that will bring your fitness up a few levels, I have done the workouts the past 2 off seasons with great results loosing weight, building strength and muscle. The workouts combine cardio,pilates,yoga,plyometrics,martial arts,strength and core workouts. The different workouts keep it interesting, and the intensity and difficulty keep it challenging. I use stretch cords because they are convient and cheap, I dont need freeweights to get a good workout, most of the moves are bodyweight anyway,pushups,chairdips,pullups,etc.

I gotta agree with the P90X routine. I began on this 3 weeks ago. Its really the ideal plan for a cyclist. Im coming off injuries, and getting older, so I needed something to help stabilize
and balance my body. Cycling is great, but it does create imbalances. Ive been doing the P90X and Im riding about 120 miles a week. I do the stretching and core symetrics the most. But I can say that the leg workout is quite tough. As winter aproach's Ill add more of the workouts into my routine. :thumbsup:
 
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