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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just picked this up a couple of weeks ago. I have longer legs and a little shorter torso, so needed something with a slightly shorter top tube. The fit feels really good. Broke it in on a vacation to the Texas hill country. Not the lightest bike around, but the ride is stable and crisp. I feel the bigger bumps, and the smaller ones are muted much more so than the Cannondale it replaced.

So here's the build details:

Size 56 frame
Kestrel Pro OS fork (supplied with the frame from Serotta)
Campy Centaur shifters, f/r der., brakes
Truvativ Roleur crankset (from the Cannondale)
Mavic Ksyrium Elites w/ Conti GP 4000
FSA K-Force Light SB 2.5 seatpost
FSA OS-140 stem
Bontrager Race bars
Look Keo pedals

So here it is...
 

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Thanks, now I have bike envy....
 

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Single Speed Cross Guy
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Wow, and double wow. I have always wanted a Serotta, and my brother sent me this link. maybe this is one for me to get also, I have a cannondale 2.8 The old old ones, which I love, but I think it may be time for an upgrade.
Cheers.
 

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Off topic, but do you get consistent readings from your Polar speed sensor being mounted on the seat stay? I've tried mounting on the seat stay and chain stay and no reading at all.

Great bike by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rear mounted speed sensor

I do get consistent readings with the sensor on the seatstay. But you will likely need to perform the following for it to work. I got this off the Polar website.

To increase the transmission range on the S510/S520/S710/S710i/S720 s-series speed/cadence sensors only:

  • Remove sensor from the bike.
  • Undo 2 small screws holding the two halves of the sensor together with a small philips screwdriver.
  • Carefully remove one section of the housing (end with cable ties).
  • Carefully slide the exposed printed circuit board a little way out.
  • Remove the jumper plug from the inner most pin and insert it over the two pins closest to the edge of the circuit board. This will give the maximum range. Shorting out the inner two pins with the jumper plug gives the medium range.
  • Re-assemble carefully in the reverse order.
  • Becareful not to over-tighten the two screws which can either distort or crack the case leaving the unit not water resistant.
  • Further information can be found on Page G82 of the S510 user's manual or Page G90 of the S710i/S720i user's manual.
TO ENSURE SENSOR WATER RESISTANCE IS MAINTAINED, PLEASE BECAREFUL DURING RE-ASSEMBLY THAT THE FINE RUBBER SEALING RING AND CASING ARE NOT DAMAGED.

I have usually had good success with this, but tried it once on a size 58 Trek and it wouldn't work. It seems the larger the bike, the less this will work.

Hope this helps.
 

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Thanks. I already did this mod to both my speed and cadence sensors but still no luck with the speed on the seat stay. Oh well...no big deal. I'll just keep the speed on the fork.
 

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titanium junkie
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661 Posts
nice serotta

Very nice bike indeed!

It would make it look even better with a set of Ksyrium ES wheels instead of those silver SLs, which are still very nice.

Thanks!:thumbsup:
 

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I got a new one too

I just purchased a 2005 Orange Fierte Steel with all Ultegra including pedals. I looked at a lot of bikes and I am happy with my purchase.
 

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I'm in the market for a first road bike and can spend in the $2500 range. Most of the bikes in that price point are carbon--I've ridden the LeMond Zurich and will test ride a Cannondale Synapse and even a CAAD for comparison with aluminum. I'm intrigued by the Serotta steel, however, which one of the LBS's I like carries and is in this price point.

A few questions:
1. I'm new to riding (less than a year) but love it. I commute up to 3 times a week (more in the summer), around 7 miles round trip, go for longer rides (25-50 miles) twice a week, and hope to get into events and centuries this summer. I like to push myself and climb hard--is the steel a viable option for this? Obvioiusly it's durable; will weight differences mean anything to me?

2. Do components vary on the stock Serotta frame depending on the bike shop, or is there a standard package for the Fierte?

3. How would Fierte riders talk me into the Fierte?

Looking forward to riding all of these and upgrading from my current bike, a 1982 Schwinn Voyager loaner that I've actually come to love.

Thanks.
 

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Los Barriles, BCS, Mexico
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1,451 Posts
steve314 said:
I'm in the market for a first road bike and can spend in the $2500 range. Most of the bikes in that price point are carbon--I've ridden the LeMond Zurich and will test ride a Cannondale Synapse and even a CAAD for comparison with aluminum. I'm intrigued by the Serotta steel, however, which one of the LBS's I like carries and is in this price point.

A few questions:
1. I'm new to riding (less than a year) but love it. I commute up to 3 times a week (more in the summer), around 7 miles round trip, go for longer rides (25-50 miles) twice a week, and hope to get into events and centuries this summer. I like to push myself and climb hard--is the steel a viable option for this? Obvioiusly it's durable; will weight differences mean anything to me?

2. Do components vary on the stock Serotta frame depending on the bike shop, or is there a standard package for the Fierte?

3. How would Fierte riders talk me into the Fierte?

Looking forward to riding all of these and upgrading from my current bike, a 1982 Schwinn Voyager loaner that I've actually come to love.

Thanks.
1. Steel is a very viable option for you! Bike weight is less important than you may think.

2. Serotta makes the frames, the LBS installs the components according to the customers requirements.

3. Ask your question over on the Serotta Forum: http://www.serotta.com/forum/
 

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I bought my Serotta Fierte steel (2005 model with 2006 10-speed Ultegra) last Labor Day. I rode Giant OCR Composite, Cannondale Synapse, Specialized Roubaix, and Trek Pilot. These are all great bikes and would be a good choice based on individual preference. I had always ridden steel and once I rode the Fierte I opted to stick with steel. It is a great comfort bike for me to ride 30-mile training rides and 50-100 mile rides on the weekend. It was just voted the best comfort road bike in Bicycling magazine. The only difference between my 2005 and newer models is the carbon seatstays.

I was not that aware of Serotta's reputation but learned about it during my bike search. I am not a die hard fan and am sure that I would have been happy with the other bikes mentioned, but for what I wanted the Fierte fits the bill perfectily. My buddy just purchased a Specialized Roubaix and is happy with his choice as well.

Once you get used to STI shifting the Schwinn will be a thing of the past. I get a lot of compliments on my 1989 Schwinn Paramount lugged steel frame and it is certainly unique, but the down tube shifting is not even remotely appealing now that I have experienced the new.

Good luck with your search whichever brand/model you select. With your budget you should be able to get an all Ultegra or higher components and wheelset that will perform well and last if you maintain it properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
cptab said:
What kind of bottle holders are on there?
They are Tacx Tao cages. I have used these cages for several years and really like them. I have yet to lose a bottle.
 

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Slow ride
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Nice! I'm on my way to my LBS to check one out they are motivated to sell. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks! I don't have it anymore, but it sure was a nice ride. Some other lucky person is now riding it.
 
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