Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Get me to In&Out
Joined
·
4,775 Posts
The best part about the wider is better trend is the touring crowd all along has been sayting this. Roadies went skinny is better all the way to 20mm tires before we moved back out to 23mm as standardish. Now everyone is talking 25mm tires and wider rims. I should just drag out my left overs from 1987 because that is exactly what we were riding back then...LOL. How long until marketing starts telling us more weight at the rim is better? It is coming.
 

·
25.806975801127
Joined
·
9,790 Posts
The best part about the wider is better trend is the touring crowd all along has been sayting this. Roadies went skinny is better all the way to 20mm tires before we moved back out to 23mm as standardish. Now everyone is talking 25mm tires and wider rims. I should just drag out my left overs from 1987 because that is exactly what we were riding back then...LOL. How long until marketing starts telling us more weight at the rim is better? It is coming.
I've actually wondered about this a bit...

Lighter rims accelerate faster. But wouldn't heavier rims have somewhat of a flywheel effect and allow someone to maintain forward momentum longer and with less overall effort? That's one thing I've noticed with light (1500g or less) wheels; they spin up fast but they "spin down" just as fast.

BTW, I use 700x28 Clements on my Cyfac, 650Bx42 on my city bike, and 700x32 on my gravel road bike (aka: do-it-all bike).
 

·
25.806975801127
Joined
·
9,790 Posts
Ohh! Do tell..
With more and more road bikes coming out with disc brakes, they'll pretty much *have* to switch to 135mm spacing. 130mm + disc makes for a pretty weak wheel. Hybrids and 'cross bikes already use 135 (as do many MTBs), so it just makes sense to me. Fewer parts for manufacturers to make, few parts for distributors and dealers to stock.
 

·
Get me to In&Out
Joined
·
4,775 Posts
Odd you mention Clement tires. I have four of them stretching on Mavic GP-4 rims in my parents garage...since 1988. My team gave them to me at the end of the season for the 1989 season so I put them on the rims to stretch. Went to college that year and never used them. They are Clement Criterium seta tires. Pretty sure the latex tube in them is completely gone, but the casing should be just about ready after 25 years. I checked ebay a couple years back and people still buy these NOS tires.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,714 Posts
With more and more road bikes coming out with disc brakes, they'll pretty much *have* to switch to 135mm spacing. 130mm + disc makes for a pretty weak wheel. Hybrids and 'cross bikes already use 135 (as do many MTBs), so it just makes sense to me. Fewer parts for manufacturers to make, few parts for distributors and dealers to stock.
Makes sense to me as well. My upcoming custom roadie will allow for 135mm rear hubs and clearance for 30-32mm tires. I was wondering if you had any more information if any of the main players is planning on an announcement soon, being in the industry et all..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
I've actually wondered about this a bit...

Lighter rims accelerate faster. But wouldn't heavier rims have somewhat of a flywheel effect and allow someone to maintain forward momentum longer and with less overall effort? That's one thing I've noticed with light (1500g or less) wheels; they spin up fast but they "spin down" just as fast.
There would be no difference in reality. For two completely even bike/rider combos (total weight), one with light and one with heavy tires, if they expend the same amount of energy (say 1000 joules), they will go the same distance. Because the lighter tires spin up faster, he'll probably reach a higher top speed and then coast less distance. The heavier wheeled bike will reach a lower speed, but because of the increased rotational inertia will coast to the EXACT same spot.

Newton was a smart man :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
891 Posts
I wonder is the rims will be available for wheel builders. C2s are already getting a little sparse on spoke hole selection.
I asked them last week, and they said they should be available as standalone rims in a few weeks. I think they will be called Belgium + rims. I'm not sure about the hole count selection.
 

·
δanned
Joined
·
7,006 Posts
I've actually wondered about this a bit...

Lighter rims accelerate faster. But wouldn't heavier rims have somewhat of a flywheel effect and allow someone to maintain forward momentum longer and with less overall effort? That's one thing I've noticed with light (1500g or less) wheels; they spin up fast but they "spin down" just as fast.

BTW, I use 700x28 Clements on my Cyfac, 650Bx42 on my city bike, and 700x32 on my gravel road bike (aka: do-it-all bike).
Lighter rims accelerate more quickly because of less rotational inertia. As the wheel's mass distribution has more toward the outside than the inside, rotational inertia increases, which makes it more difficult to spin up but does offer better momentum once you're at speed. However, if you want the best of both worlds, you should build a wheel with a light rim and heavy hub. That way your rotational inertia is minimized, but you still have enough mass to conserve momentum reasonably well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,714 Posts
However, if you want the best of both worlds, you should build a wheel with a light rim and heavy hub. That way your rotational inertia is minimized, but you still have enough mass to conserve momentum reasonably well.
Hmmm....that's a theory absent of the guy with the funny hat riding the bike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,726 Posts
Lighter rims accelerate faster. But wouldn't heavier rims have somewhat of a flywheel effect and allow someone to maintain forward momentum longer and with less overall effort?
Think of wheels like a flywheel - heavier wheels (rim/tire/tube) take more energy to spin up but will hold that spin longer because they have higher kintetic engergy. However this only applies to speed changes and has NOTHING to do with "maintain[ing] forward momentum longer and with less overall effort." Heavier equipment/rider slighly increases tire rolling resistance losses but on the flats any weight difference in a wheel would result in negligible speed differences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
I wonder is the rims will be available for wheel builders. C2s are already getting a little sparse on spoke hole selection.
I have confirmed that HED will first roll out the wheels to market then will roll out rims for wheel builders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I've actually wondered about this a bit...

Lighter rims accelerate faster. But wouldn't heavier rims have somewhat of a flywheel effect and allow someone to maintain forward momentum longer and with less overall effort? That's one thing I've noticed with light (1500g or less) wheels; they spin up fast but they "spin down" just as fast.
.
I had a pair of Campagnolo fluid disk wheels built with that theory and maybe it was faster on super flat, straight TT's? I also had some 1st gen Campy deep section wheels that filled up with water. All I remember is at the end of rainy races my bike was 5 or 6 lbs heavier than the beginning, so you had better be in a solo break because your jump on your sprint was not going to be "explosive" accelerating a extra 5lbs of weight!
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top