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leon2982
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see Litespeed announced a new lower-priced frameset that uses 3AL/2.5V titanium tubing. Just looking for comments on this tubing in terms of how rigid/stiff these new frames might be.
 

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Pinarello = Explode!
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Having worked with both alloys (non bike related) I would say the 3al2.5v is better suited for a bike frame, its easier to weld, its easier to machine, its tougher, and the difference in strenght is minimal, if you break a 6al4v frame the 3al2.5v frame would have died too. and vice versa. I would choose 3al2.5v because its more forgiving, so the welder dont have to be as good. If I could choose I'd choose sandvik 3al2.5v, but thats just me, the difference is not important to me if done correct, I doubt I would feel it, and I highly doubt it would make a difference in a crash either way. I would go with the cheapest one.
 

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Los Barriles, BCS, Mexico
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1,456 Posts
leon2982 said:
I see Litespeed announced a new lower-priced frameset that uses 3AL/2.5V titanium tubing. Just looking for comments on this tubing in terms of how rigid/stiff these new frames might be.
3AL/2.5V is the 'standard' tubing used by a majority of the builders. Whether a bike is rigid/stiff or noodly will depend on the specific tubes used and how the bike is constructed. By specific tubes I mean that 3AL/2.5V is merely a type of titanium. How the tube is made; thin walled, thick walled, butted or not, shaped or not will determine, along with geometry and construction of the bike itself, the characteristics the bike will posess.
 

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duh...
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9,658 Posts
longcat said:
Having worked with both alloys (non bike related) I would say the 3al2.5v is better suited for a bike frame, its easier to weld, its easier to machine, its tougher, and the difference in strenght is minimal, if you break a 6al4v frame the 3al2.5v frame would have died too. and vice versa. I would choose 3al2.5v because its more forgiving, so the welder dont have to be as good. If I could choose I'd choose sandvik 3al2.5v, but thats just me, the difference is not important to me if done correct, I doubt I would feel it, and I highly doubt it would make a difference in a crash either way. I would go with the cheapest one.


3/2.5 is typical and what litespeed has used for a long time... for awhile, maybe they still do, they used 6/4 in some models and marketed it as "better" and charged accordingly
 

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Pinarello = Explode!
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114 Posts
It was several yeas ago I bought Ti but I remember 6al4v was more expensive, I would guess a frame would be much more expensive % wise than the price difference of the metal.
 

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Juanmoretime
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2,203 Posts
Litespeed always made certain models from 3.25. It must be the new and improved version that they played classical music for while welding and hugged it every day tell the tubing that they loved it. Don't get me wrong. Litespeed builds nice frames but the statement stinks of marketing hype.
 

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Steaming piles of opinion
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Juanmoretime said:
Litespeed always made certain models from 3.25. It must be the new and improved version that they played classical music for while welding and hugged it every day tell the tubing that they loved it. Don't get me wrong. Litespeed builds nice frames but the statement sticks of marketing hype.
Marketing hype? Collaboration with NASA? C'mon.:)

Litespeed almost always made the greater percentage of most bikes out of 3/2.5. Most 6/4 bikes only have it in the main triangle, and often enough only in the top and down tubes.

Not a lot of point (and a lot of difficulty) using 6/4 for machined parts, and for small-diameter stays, there's not much savings to be had. In the larger diameters and especially in sheet-formed tubes, it can allow for thinner walls and a slightly lighter build.

Rigidity, stiffness, or strength really don't have much to do with the alloy, but rather with the design. By eye, the Xicon appears like it would be a reasonably solid frame.

Bottom line, they're trying to compete with the Lynskey Cooper. Reactive marketing is always an interesting effort, seldom enough successful. If I were in that market, I know which I'd buy.
 
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