Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
I'm looking at buying my first gravel bike that will also spend some time on nontechnical trails.
Since bikes are hard to come by lately, I am limited to these to choose from locally:

Giant Revolt Advanced 3
Specialized Diverge E5 Comp
2021 and 2020 Trek Checkpoint SL5
2017 Specialized Crux Expert X1 with these upgrades: Quarq Power Meter
Force 1 long derailleur
10-42 Rear Cassette
700x38 Specialized Tracer Pro Tires
Leaning toward the '21 Checkpoint SL5, but opinions will be appreciated as this is my first gravel bike.
I'm in North Dakota, USA, so long, rolling hills of gravel is where I'll be spending the most time.
Thanks in advance.

Bicycle Tire Wheel Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Bicycle wheel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,576 Posts
Test ride whatever you can, choose that way.
Agreed. The differences between the major manufacturers will boil the choice down to color and little else. Get the bike that FITS the best with little to swap out to make it comfortable i.e. saddle swap, etc. . They all have excellent reputations and warranties.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
Re: the Checkpoints. The 2021 has a movable rear axle meant to be used when the bike is loaded for touring. The 2022 doesn’t have that feature, but does have a standard seatpost as opposed to the “seatmast” on the 2021, so you could run a dropper if desired. The 2022 also has the in$frame tool storage.

I have the 2021 SL5 and flog the heck out of it. I have two sets of wheels so I’m good to go for a weekend of mixed riding.
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
16,566 Posts
Test ride whatever you can, choose that way.
Agreed. The differences between the major manufacturers will boil the choice down to color and little else. Get the bike that FITS the best with little to swap out to make it comfortable i.e. saddle swap, etc. . They all have excellent reputations and warranties.
^^^Exactly this^^^

And if you can find them, try test riding the Jamis Renegade and GT Grade as well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Eaglesandducksss

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I appreciate the responses.
The one bike on my list of choices that concerns me is the Giant Revolt.
It looks to be an awesome bike, and is affordable, but many of it's components might
only be interchangeable with Giant parts. Maybe I'm wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,863 Posts
I appreciate the responses.
The one bike on my list of choices that concerns me is the Giant Revolt.
It looks to be an awesome bike, and is affordable, but many of it's components might
only be interchangeable with Giant parts. Maybe I'm wrong.
How much experience do you have riding bikes? For most people a test ride is as useless as the random set-up the bike store salesperson sets the saddle height and the like. Sounds like you know what you will ride and what you have plenty of and your choices will all do very well on that surface. Depending on how those roads are maintained will determine a best tire width. The worse the roads the wider the tires. I wouldn’t worry at all about differences between brands. They are all the same, essentially, and if you are inexperienced, it wouldn’t matter anyway. Tires matter. Get the cheapest bike with the tires that best match your riding surfaces. All of the groupsets work fine so don’t worry about that, the cheaper sets are just heavier, but they work fine and will last. The frame and fork will be indistinguishable and may well be made in a Giant factory regardless of the decal on it. The only other consideration, and it’s not minor, is the vibe you get from the shop you are looking to buy from. It’s nice to be established at a local shop.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Eaglesandducksss

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
16,566 Posts
I appreciate the responses.
The one bike on my list of choices that concerns me is the Giant Revolt.
It looks to be an awesome bike, and is affordable, but many of it's components might only be interchangeable with Giant parts. Maybe I'm wrong.
This in itself would be good enough reason to not walk, but run away from the Giant Revolt, IMO. I hate proprietary parts!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,527 Posts
What???? The Gian't Revolt I looked at had ZERO propriatory parts. What are you talking about.
You should take a 20 mile drive on the gravel roads you are going to ride, if you can't drive your car 20mph on them, they are too rough for a 'gravel' bike. It is all 'gravel' BS!
They should rename them "P Gravel" bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
What are you currently riding? If you already have a road bike, it's nice if your gravel bike has some compatibility. This comes in handy, mainly with the gearing, so that you can swap wheels between the bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,844 Posts
That is a lot of test bikes to ride. Surprised that a bike shop in N Dakota has that many bikes to choose from. You don't mention price. Also the component group and wheelset is a big factor. No experience with Specialized bikes, but they make good stuff from what I read. Let us know which one you end up with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
What???? The Gian't Revolt I looked at had ZERO propriatory parts. What are you talking about.
You should take a 20 mile drive on the gravel roads you are going to ride, if you can't drive your car 20mph on them, they are too rough for a 'gravel' bike. It is all 'gravel' BS!
They should rename them "P Gravel" bikes.
The seat tube is "D" shaped and unlike any other brand.
It's even called the "D-fuse" seat post.
Now, you folks will know better than I, but if a person was on a vacation with their Giant Revolt, and broke a seat post, AND no local bike shop sold Giant bikes, would the biking part of the vacation be over?
I asked the dealership if there were any other Giant specific parts and he said there were.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
What are you currently riding? If you already have a road bike, it's nice if your gravel bike has some compatibility. This comes in handy, mainly with the gearing, so that you can swap wheels between the bikes.
Well....I don't currently own a bike. I haven't for many years I am 57-years -old and an untra runner. I compete in running races anywhere for 50 miles to 150 miles.
Long ago (mid-late 90s) I raced mountain bikes in Oregon, Washington and northern California, but have done little riding since.
I'm considering making the move to gravel bikes and lessening the amount of running I do.
As a "Last Hooraw" I have entered this kinda crazy off-road Ironman competition that will take place in mid July.
2.5 mile swim
112 mile gravel and trail biking
27 mile run
The ENDRacing Wilderman Ironman (Extreme North Dakota Racing=EndRacing) and I need a bike for the race, and one that I plan to use quite often in years to come.
There is no ONE bike shop that has the bikes I have listed. Those shops are up to 200 miles apart and each has one bike except for th two SLs, and the crux is a private seller.
Sorry for the long bio, but since I'll maybe be spending a lot of time on this forum, it can be my introduction. ;-)
The Wilderman Ironman:
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
16,566 Posts
The seat tube is "D" shaped and unlike any other brand.
I would disqualify the bike for this reason alone. If you want to change to a different seat post, you can't. You are limited to this proprietary seatpost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
How often has anyone broken a seapost? I’ve never broken one…I get the idea “what if” but my guess is if you wreck bad enough to break a seatpost you’re not going to be too worried about riding your bike home and I suppose you will have a lot more damage than just the seat post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
How often has anyone broken a seapost? I’ve never broken one…I get the idea “what if” but my guess is if you wreck bad enough to break a seatpost you’re not going to be too worried about riding your bike home and I suppose you will have a lot more damage than just the seat post.
I've been on a ride where a fellow rider had the single bolt snap. Lesson learned and I know only use 2 bolt seatposts. I will not buy a bike that uses a non standard seatpost.
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
16,566 Posts
How often has anyone broken a seapost? I’ve never broken one…I get the idea “what if” but my guess is if you wreck bad enough to break a seatpost you’re not going to be too worried about riding your bike home and I suppose you will have a lot more damage than just the seat post.
Even if you don't break it, if you just want to replace the seatpost with something different like a seatpost with a different setback, guess what? You can't. You're stuck with Giant.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Eaglesandducksss

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,863 Posts
Even if you don't break it, if you just want to replace the seatpost with something different like a seatpost with a different setback, guess what? You can't. You're stuck with Giant.
Total PITA when I changed to zero setback on my Scott Foil. Proprietary design. I found one in the UK and it was $120 + pricey shipping.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Eaglesandducksss

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
How often has anyone broken a seapost? I’ve never broken one…I get the idea “what if” but my guess is if you wreck bad enough to break a seatpost you’re not going to be too worried about riding your bike home and I suppose you will have a lot more damage than just the seat post.
What if I wanted a different seat post? Maybe one that is not manufactured by Giant? I’ve taken the Revolt off the list.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top