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Roadie with unshaven legs
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Currently, I have an old Specialized Stumpjumper rigid that has been converted into a commuter bike with 700c wheels. At about 26 pounds it's a bit heavy, which isn't the best thing for hills and I happen to live on one. In less than one mile I climb about 300 feet, which is a workout in and of itself. I almost always end up dripping with sweat when I get home even if it's 50 degrees and foggy outside and my legs are really sore from the climb. The Stumpie has a set of full fenders for inclement weather riding and a rack, though I've never really used it for commuting. When I ride the Stumpie I only ride a little more than four miles each way to the subway, where I lock it up for the day until I go home. If I ride all the way to work I take my geared road bike and that ride is a little over 11 miles to work and either 11 miles or 16 miles to get home, depending on which way I go.

I have an opportunity to buy back a frame that I had bought early on that was a little large for me. For road bikes I typically ride a bike that has a 52.5cm top tube. This bike has a 54. It's a Leader 735R with a Bianchi fork that was built as my second ever road bike. I sold it because it was too large for me and because the ride, being an aluminum framed bike, is a bit harsh.

So, the questions are: should I even buy this frame back? If I do should I build it with a drop bar and a really short stem (75mm) or a flat bar with a normal length stem? I can ride either one comfortably on my commute if I need to. If I go drops should I go with brifters (older Campy Mirage) or brake levers and mismatched friction bar-end shifters? Depending on which bike I take the parts from I can build it in any one of three ways without having to buy anything more than new brake and shift cables with housings. Sorry, downtube shifters are not an option as there are only cable stops on that frame. Yes, I am willing to sacrifice two of my bikes to get this one bike built and the road bike that will sacrifice its parts will be rebuilt with higher level parts. I am leaning towards stripping the Stumpie to build this bike up, which will leave the road bike alone and the commuter bike will end up with lower-end parts which will make it less appealing to thieves when I do lock it up at the subway station. The Stumpie frame will end up on eBay. I plan on getting some minimalist race-bike fenders for it for those eventual wet rides to work. I lose the ability to use a rack but I am willing to sacrifice this.
 

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Leader frames

we will be listing alot of frames this week on ebay with no reserve. they are mostly all brand new old stock. you should check ebay tommorow in the evening and bid on a frame that is your size. what is your height and inseam? i will tell you what frame size to get.

we will be listing 735R, 785R and 780R frames. many time trial frames as well. there are reviews of these frames on this site.

Brian
 

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No comment on your frame,

At about 26 pounds it's a bit heavy, which isn't the best thing for hills and I happen to live on one. In less than one mile I climb about 300 feet, which is a workout in and of itself. I almost always end up dripping with sweat when I get home even if it's 50 degrees and foggy outside and my legs are really sore from the climb.
but I respectfully suggest you might want to work on conditioning, and get a little perspective.
A mile-long 6% grade is a moderately steep, though pretty short, little workout. Sweating at the end of it (if you go hard) would be expected, but if it's true that it makes your legs "really sore," that's not because of 6 or 7 extra pounds of bike.
 

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Roadie with unshaven legs
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2,041 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The thing about the size is this: I have three road bike frames right now. My old steel Guerciotti has a 525mm top tube with a 105mm stem (630mm combined reach). My old steel Colnago has a 530mm top tube with a 100mm stem (630mm combined reach). My Pedal Force RS has a 535mm top tube with a 90mm stem (625mm combined reach). The Leader, with a 540mm top tube, would have a 640mm combined reach with a 90mm stem but for commuting I would like a little more upright riding position so I was thinking of a shorter stem. Running a flat bar, since drop bars bend forward to the hoods, my favorite position to ride, means that I can run a longer stem and have a reach that is comparable to riding the hoods.

As for the weight of my existing commuter bike I'm running a mountain bike triple (44/34/22) on it but with a 12/25 in the rear. I have ridden the same hills with my 16 pound roadie with compact double and 12/25 cassette and that bike just feels more lively. Also, I find that I have to carry the bike up and down stairs when I get to the subway and a lighter bike would be nice there, too. If I build this bike it will be running a compact double with the same 12/25 cassette that is on the Stumpie now.

I'm just trying to figure out how I should proceed with this. As it is I'm dedicating two bikes to the purpose of getting to work whereas I can build this one bike and use it exclusively for riding to work, whether I'm riding all the way in or riding to the subway. It could also double as my group ride bike in a pinch so that I don't have to take a nicer bike out and worry about being in a crash.
 
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