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Slow rider on fast wheels
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, a new road biker here encountering problems with a new saddle and bike fitting.

I've got a Giant TCR Comp 3. I changed the stock saddle to a Fizik Arione after a few rides. Strangely, the new saddle felt more uncomfortable during rides, and I get a rather lasting sore between the seat bones and the private parts. :eek: It wasn't so bad when I used the stock Giant saddle.

Other things to note are that I always felt my body being stretched out too far forward, and a lot of weight is being placed on the handlebar shifter hoods with my hands. And I would always gradually be seated further forward on the saddle, instead of on the widest areas of the saddle. During and after rides, I would feel some soreness in the grip area between my thumb and index finger, and also have a rather lasting sore between the seat bones and the private parts.

Fitting wise, wrenchscience says my frame sizing (53.5cm) and handlebar sizes (44cm) are correct, and saddle height has been adjusted accordingly, but I am using a stock 100mm stem instead of the recommended 130mm on wrenchscience. I've also tried to change the saddle position by shifting it forwards, but I've read somewhere that it is not advisable, compared to changing the stem length or raising the handlebar height instead. My saddle is also angled relatively parallel to the ground.

Can anyone offer any advice as to what the problem is, and any suggestions as to how to solve it?

Many thanks!
 

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sounds like the bike is too long for you

sounds like the bike is too long for you - no matter what anything else "says"

the cheapest thing to do is push the saddle forward and get a shorter and or taller stem

let us know what happens
 

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Steaming piles of opinion
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A few thoughts:

Different saddles fit different butts. The Arione might not be the one for you.

Wrenchscience calcs came up with a crazy-long stem number for me. That could be user error, but in the most general terms your stem seems to match your frame. Unless you feel that you are oddly proportioned, I'd leave that alone. Besides, a longer stem would tend to make things worse.

Small changes in saddle tilt can make big differences in comfort. A tiny bit up-tilt works to keep me 'in' my saddle and prevent the high-center pain you are describing. Yep, it sounds a little counterintuitive, but combined with the sensations of being too weighted in front and sliding forward, it might make sense for you, too. Some folks have luch the other way, too.

Your saddle could be too far back - not relative to the bars, but to the pedals. It might also be a bit too high, though it sounds like you've worked on that.

Other parts of your setup can matter, too. The problem could be too much drop between the saddle and handlebars for your current level of flexibility.

There's unfortuntately no way to see what's going on via the internet, so the best advice I can give is to make small changes one at a time until you get it dialed in.
 

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danl1 said:
Small changes in saddle tilt can make big differences in comfort. A tiny bit up-tilt works to keep me 'in' my saddle and prevent the high-center pain you are describing. Yep, it sounds a little counterintuitive, but combined with the sensations of being too weighted in front and sliding forward, it might make sense for you, too. Some folks have luch the other way, too.

Your saddle could be too far back - not relative to the bars, but to the pedals. It might also be a bit too high, though it sounds like you've worked on that.
Good call on the saddle tilt and height, but I'm not sure about the setback. Unless the reach really is way too long, a saddle too far forward typically puts more weight on the hands, since it moves your center of mass forward relative to the bottom bracket. I would try moving your cleats back in accordance with Steve Hogg's tips on cyclingnews -- as much as 1 cm behind the ball of your foot -- since that will let you get your center of mass a bit farther forward without as much saddle setback. Raising the bars could help, too -- add spacers or flip the stem up if you can.

Also, the Arione could just be too narrow for you -- especially if you're sitting on the nose! Try getting your seatbone width measured using the Specialized Ass-o-meter (not official name), and look for something in the same recommended range. Personally, I find 130 mm saddles (Arione, SLR) unbearable, 140 mm ones (Turbo, Flite) pretty good, and 150 mm ones (Vitesse, Regal) rideable all day. Shape matters, but I think enough width to support your sitbones is paramount. Good luck ... let us know how it works out!

Cheers,
Ari
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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Being stretched out may also be a function of your bar width. For someone small enough to be sized to a frame in the 53cm range, it would be unlikely (IMO) that you'd want 44 bars. And if those are measured center-to-center they could really be pretty wide. That can really give a feeling of reaching out too much and weight falling forward.

There are so many factors at play in your fit that rather than the trial and error of fooling with it yourself, I'd pay for a proper fitting at an LBS. Did you buy this bike at an LBS? If so, they should be helping with this issue.
 

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where you sit matters

if you are stretching too far to reach the bars, you will likely be too far forward on you saddle. I spend alot of time on my trainer thinking about where I am sitting on the saddle. this is a good place to experiment. it is totally different than being on the road because your pressure on the saddle is constant, try moving forward and back, and adjusting the tilt of your saddle. BTW - I ride a stock Giant OCR 2 saddle, and like it quite a bit. or more accurately I should say, I don't really have any thoughts on the OCR saddle because I never notice it(which is the best sign that it is a good fit). I ride a different bike on the trainer, so I do notice it more
 

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Half bad advice

brerabbit3 said:
the cheapest thing to do is push the saddle forward and get a shorter and or taller stem
Shorter or taller stem makes sense. Moving the saddle is done to achieve the proper relationship to the BB. You should NOT move the saddle to adjust the reach to the bars.
 

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Slow rider on fast wheels
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Appreciate all the advice given guys!

To be honest, I never got fitted, the LBS guess-timated my required bike size, which apparently turned out to be correct, and then the rest of the parts just came stock with the bike.

I'm currently staying with the 44cm bar as that's also my shoulder width.

I'll try adjusting the saddle tilt, then handlebar height, and then the stem length, and finally the saddle if all else fails. I'll let you all know if it works out.

Thanks again!
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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theychosenone said:
Appreciate all the advice given guys!

I'm currently staying with the 44cm bar as that's also my shoulder width.
Don't believe every rule of thumb, especially that one (which would have most of us on bars that are too wide). What you've described suggests that the bar width could indeed be a factor and I wouldn't ignore that.
 
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