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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Soma Smoothie frame & 5800. Look what tire it takes!

It's not the ES model but the straight up black smoothie. The first thing I had to do was find out if I truly needed long reach brakes, so I mounted up something large that would let me know what I had.

This is a 33c Specialized Tracer Pro 2bliss 33c cross tire on a Specialized Roval Pave 25 wheel. (Supposedly that's a 19c internal width, but I haven't verified that.) There is enough clearance that if I had slicks in this size, I wouldn't hesitate riding it on a clean road only. Any rougher stuff and I would prefer a bit more room for foreign bits to pass through. This top area is the smallest clearance over the whole frame.
Automotive tire Photograph White Tread Rim
I then attached a 105-5800 Shimano rear caliper and found that indeed, there is no clearance. There is just enough rub that no foreign bits will pass through. So, as Soma says it can handle a 28c, it will indeed handle a Michelin 28c that measures 31mm wide and 25mm tall, but hardly anything more with safe room to spare, and if you want more clearance than that, then you might want to get a true to size 28c tire. As far as actual reach of the caliper, the 105-5800 caliper (reach up to 49mm) still has pad-holder adjustability left, so regular short reach calipers like this one are definitely usable. Getting the tire past the pads without a quick caliper release somewhere would be the only issue.
Bicycle tire Bicycle part Bicycle accessory Automotive tire Rim
But the tire height is limited to the actual metal of the brake mount on the frame. The 5800 caliper hardly infringes on that. The dual pivots, as you can see, are very close and are the only real interference in this application.

Thought it would be interesting to you all. Frame delivered at 4.875 pounds in 60 size.
 

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"Getting the tire past the pads without a quick caliper release somewhere would be the only issue."

Huge issue. It's hard enough on my Smoothie to fit 28's inflated back on the bike.

I ran Ruffy Tuffies for years on my Smoothie, they were true at 28mm and I could see that anything larger wasn't going to work. I was OK with that as it's really a road bike designed for 28 and smaller and Soma is clear on that.

I do sometimes have a wish for to own an ES as well to get the larger tire size capability. Love the new blue paint on that model as well.

Love the ride on my Smootihe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not as big an issue as you might think. they do make in-line quick disconnectors for brake cables, usually seen in break-away travelling frames. Ritchey makes some that work very well and I might have to get some of those depending on how the Michelin's I'm planning on running fit. They're 31mm actual measure even though labeled 28c. I want those because they're not only durable winter-ish tires, but they have exceptionally low rolling resistance, and in that size, approach the performance of a 25c gp4000sii. Going from gatorskins or even gp4seasons, these will free up quite a bit of wasted energy. I'm going for a Roubaix in steel form sort of build and I found a good collection of parts to make that happen. If I truly need long reach brakes to make it work, then I'll just have to do that.
 

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What fork did you use on this build? Their website said the carbon fork didn’t take all 28mm tires. Thanks
 

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What fork did you use on this build? Their website said the carbon fork didn’t take all 28mm tires. Thanks
You might want to know this is post is almost 18 mos. old., not sure the OP is still following.

FWIW, my Smoothie is a 2010 and has the stock Soma steel fork, which I thought would look better - white fork matched to white frame. The new black frame might look fine with a black carbon fork, but I’d maybe e-mail Soma to find out which carbon works
 
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