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I'm not well educated in this flu (or most) but I do know the influenza virus is extremely mutagentic so I would doubt it's man-made.
 

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Hopefully, gentlemen, we are witnessing the very early stages of a planet-wide zombie epidemic. Keep your fingers crossed and your katana handy.
 

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I should know my viruses better but I'm most comfortable with bacteria. It's been 10 years since my last 500 level virology class and 4 years since I did any lab work at the cellular level. I'm an electrician now so forgive any minute errors.

Bacterial mutations are common, even within closed conditions of a pure culture. Exposure to other bacterium results in transference of information such as drug resistance and the ability to use food sources. Think of it as simple give and take exchange.

The machinery of viruses differ in that they require a host cell to pirate and utilize its internal mechanisms to replicate. Any information picked up by the virus is a result of transcription of the DNA or mRNA. If it makes it easier to think of it this way, imagine you're making photocopies of a map. As you run out of copies you go to make more, but you've given away the original and now have to use a copy to make more. Then you run out again. Again, you make copies using a copy. As you do that the quality of the original map is lost and you can't see the intersections as clearly as the original. So you make guesses to complete the route on the map. You still make it to the destination, but you're making changes in the route. I've vastly oversimplified the process, but you get the idea.

I suppose if you really want an answer as to why the Swine Flu is reappearing, you should call the CIA and ask them what they're up to.
 

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I should know my viruses better too, but I think if a cell is infected with two or more variants of a virus, the genetic material can be repackaged and surface antigens can appear in previously unencountered combinations, which avoid immune detection.


TWB8s said:
I should know my viruses better but I'm most comfortable with bacteria. It's been 10 years since my last 500 level virology class and 4 years since I did any lab work at the cellular level. I'm an electrician now so forgive any minute errors.

Bacterial mutations are common, even within closed conditions of a pure culture. Exposure to other bacterium results in transference of information such as drug resistance and the ability to use food sources. Think of it as simple give and take exchange.

The machinery of viruses differ in that they require a host cell to pirate and utilize its internal mechanisms to replicate. Any information picked up by the virus is a result of transcription of the DNA or mRNA. If it makes it easier to think of it this way, imagine you're making photocopies of a map. As you run out of copies you go to make more, but you've given away the original and now have to use a copy to make more. Then you run out again. Again, you make copies using a copy. As you do that the quality of the original map is lost and you can't see the intersections as clearly as the original. So you make guesses to complete the route on the map. You still make it to the destination, but you're making changes in the route. I've vastly oversimplified the process, but you get the idea.

I suppose if you really want an answer as to why the Swine Flu is reappearing, you should call the CIA and ask them what they're up to.
 
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