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Man, as long as I've been riding I should know better. Mounted some new Michelin Pro race 2's on, and I flew outside for a ride. Went to make a 90 degree at the end of my street and WHAM!!! Down really hard. . Figgin' tires slipped out from under me. Got to watch new tires, and I should know better! Now I've got a swollen ankle, road rash all up and down my right side, and possibly a broken carbon bar which will be replaced with a cheaper aluminum one if it's cracked. What a crappy 4th of July it was.:mad2:
 

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Same thing happened to me several years ago. It was the first and only bike crash I've ever had. In my case, it was some Michelin Axial Pros that I had hanging in my garage for a while. Put them on, rode about 4 miles, and my bike slid out from under me on a routine 90-degree corner that I've gone through hundreds of times. There was no sand, oil or anything else on the road to cause the slippage. The tires were just slick from being new. I have started lightly sanding new tires with very fine sandpaper, particularly if the tires have been sitting around for a while.
 

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Are those sew-ups?

KATZRKOL said:
Man, as long as I've been riding I should know better. Mounted some new Michelin Pro race 2's on, and I flew outside for a ride. Went to make a 90 degree at the end of my street and WHAM!!! Down really hard. . Figgin' tires slipped out from under me. Got to watch new tires, and I should know better! Now I've got a swollen ankle, road rash all up and down my right side, and possibly a broken carbon bar which will be replaced with a cheaper aluminum one if it's cracked. What a crappy 4th of July it was.:mad2:
I ride sew-ups on one of my bicycles; since several lbs have discontinued installing them due to liability concerns, I have decided there must be a reason; so, if they have all this experience installing tires and still are aware of new tire problems, I have let lbs install all of my new sew-ups. There are still a few out there. They do this for a living; I'll will defer to their experience since I only install these tires a couple of times a year, at best.
 

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Boom

I had a brand new Hutchinson tire blow off the rim half a mile from my house the other day. Probably not mounted right but checked carefully and it was sitting, aired up, for 5 or 6 hours before the ride.
 

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Not sure if it's the same for bike tires but I know motorcycle tires can be slippery until they're scrubbed in.
Evidently has something to do with the agent they use to get them to release from the mold when manufacturing them.
need to get some miles in to get that stuff off first - the sandpaper idea sounds like a good one
 

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Route 66 Domestiques said:
I ride sew-ups on one of my bicycles; since several lbs have discontinued installing them due to liability concerns, I have decided there must be a reason; so, if they have all this experience installing tires and still are aware of new tire problems, I have let lbs install all of my new sew-ups. There are still a few out there. They do this for a living; I'll will defer to their experience since I only install these tires a couple of times a year, at best.
He's riding clinchers. I'm guessing that the michelins have a mold release agent as others suggested, and would be fine with a few miles in them (and maybe watch the pressure at first).

There's no special risk to properly installed tubulars at all. You can learn to do it yourself, as most do--there's a process, but it's not rocket science--or you can pay someone else to do it. My guess is that lots of younger shop rats grew up in the age of clinchers and don't know any better, and that that, as much as anything, explains why some shops no longer offer the service.
 

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rzims said:
Not sure if it's the same for bike tires but I know motorcycle tires can be slippery until they're scrubbed in.
Evidently has something to do with the agent they use to get them to release from the mold when manufacturing them.
need to get some miles in to get that stuff off first - the sandpaper idea sounds like a good one

Agreed - new motorcycle tires are like ice. When I put a new rear tire on my road bike, I figured it would be about the same and took it pretty slow for awhile. The trick to scrubbing in tires (moto or bicycle) is to very gradually increase your lean angle through the turns, i.e., go straight for a while, then do some low speed weaving, then increase speed and leaning until the rubber is roughed up. On motorcycles you can judge the skill (insanity?) of the rider by seeing how close to the edge of the tire is roughed up.
 

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wow! I am not aware that new tires have this potential slippage danger. Then I must be lucky I didn't wipe out when I took my new bike with new tires out this past weekend. I was even doing a flying 90 degree turn just seconds after the bike touched pavement for the first time. I am using Vittoria Rubino Pro and they are pretty sticky to the touch out the box and I thought that it was very safe to rip on them immediately. Come to think of it I did another fast 90 degree turn at the same corner (intersection in downtown) but was 30 miles later... I could have potentially wiped out again and that would have ruined my day/week/month/year. I better take it easy until the tires are fully run in.
 

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Route 66 Domestiques said:
I ride sew-ups on one of my bicycles; since several lbs have discontinued installing them due to liability concerns, I have decided there must be a reason; so, if they have all this experience installing tires and still are aware of new tire problems, I have let lbs install all of my new sew-ups. There are still a few out there. They do this for a living; I'll will defer to their experience since I only install these tires a couple of times a year, at best.
Umm yeah. In this lawsuit happy time we're in, do you blame em for not installing tubies?

Personally? I trust me much more than I do anyone else to look after my best interests!

MC tires do the same thing. Takes em ~100mi to get that mold release off. I've heard of several of my buddies doing similar things on 400+ pound bikes!

M
 

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kdub said:
wow! I am not aware that new tires have this potential slippage danger. Then I must be lucky I didn't wipe out when I took my new bike with new tires out this past weekend. I was even doing a flying 90 degree turn just seconds after the bike touched pavement for the first time. I am using Vittoria Rubino Pro and they are pretty sticky to the touch out the box and I thought that it was very safe to rip on them immediately. Come to think of it I did another fast 90 degree turn at the same corner (intersection in downtown) but was 30 miles later... I could have potentially wiped out again and that would have ruined my day/week/month/year. I better take it easy until the tires are fully run in.

I didn't know either.. but I turn corner hard.. I almost bit it trying to last week - but the front wheel hit a stone and almost knocked me off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Good description. .

nonsleepingjon said:
Agreed - new motorcycle tires are like ice.
It was amazing how friggin' slick these were! I mean, I've used Michelins before but these were slick!! When I went down I wasn't even leaning in more than 10 degrees of angle at maybe 15 mph.
 

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in memory of John Evans

KATZRKOL said:
Man, as long as I've been riding I should know better. Mounted some new Michelin Pro race 2's on, and I flew outside for a ride. Went to make a 90 degree at the end of my street and WHAM!!! Down really hard. . Figgin' tires slipped out from under me. Got to watch new tires, and I should know better! Now I've got a swollen ankle, road rash all up and down my right side, and possibly a broken carbon bar which will be replaced with a cheaper aluminum one if it's cracked. What a crappy 4th of July it was.:mad2:
Several years ago, when I lived in Los Angeles full-time, I would ride week-ends with a Brit who was some 15 years my senior; being from England he said he had grown up riding bicycles as I had grown up wanting to be the next Mickey Mantle.
We met on a ride when he asked me if I were riding the same make bicycle as his.
I was. So, we rode together the balance of the day along the coast. Since then, most week-end mornings, my phone would ring at 0630. It was John wanting to know if I wanted to "head out." He rode alone since his wife was a school teacher in Acapulco--where they would retire and "live off the economy."
(he was an engineer at Hughes Aerospace in El Segundo). Often I did; and we would ride north toward Oxnard or south toward Long Beach.
I learned much about bicycles and riding including why he didn't wear a helmet (at that time, neither did I); he said that "it just didn't look cool; and in 55 years of riding, he had not needed one."
About a year later, on a Saturday morning, he did not phone; I "headed out" on my own
(as in the pre-John Evans days) riding north along Pacific Coast Highway toward Oxnard,
always a beautiful ride along the ocean, uneventful.
The next morning, a Sunday, at 0630, John Evans phones. "Let's head-out." I sleepily
agree; and I ride south to meet up with him on Sepulveda Blvd. in El Segundo. In the first hour, John tells me that he didn't ride the previous day because he had put on two new tires and wanted them to "set" until the next morning.
They were Michelins (not to infer anything--it only brought the event into focus).
In the second hour, after a stop, we are riding along Palos Verdes Peninsula somewhere south of Western Avenue; all morning John had been a couple hundred yards in front of me (his legs were fresh). Somewhere north of the fire station, I look up--as John goes down...head first into the asphalt...never turning loose of the handle bars--crashing to the left into the road away from the shoulder.
I race up to his crash site as he is standing up over his bike: blood is everywhere. He looks at me with glazed eyes: "did I crash?"
"Yes, John, you crashed." I told him to sit down. Someone had to come along shortly.
And, with John's bloody head in my lap, an automobile did come by. They surveyed the situation; I told them there was the fire station down the road a couple of bends.
They headed off; and, a few minutes later, I heard the sirens on the fire equipment.
A fire truck and a paramedic vehicle arrived; John was driven away to a hospital in Manhattan Beach by the paramedics and his bicycle was placed on the fire truck and headed toward the station house.
I reversed my course, and rode home. That night about 1800, I drove to the hospital where I met with medical staff. I was told that they had to remove 80 per cent of his brain to stop the hemorraging. This was on a Fourth of July week-end. John never left the hospital and died the first week-end in December.
Riding new tires may have had nothing to do with John's death; he had ridden over a broken green (you decide the brand) beer bottle forcing his front tire off the pavement into loose gravel; he lost control and went down in excess of 25 mph.
But, I learned more, from John's crash, about helmets than about new bicycle tires.
The next Saturday, I rode to a lbs in Santa Monica and purchased the "best" helmet they had; and like the guy in an above discussion who had to walk home only in his socks, I feel naked riding without a helmet. I then drove to the fire station in PV to retreive John's bike.
PS: I had to find John's brother who lived in Santa Monica and tell him and John's son about the bicycle crash; and, I had to meet John's wife at LAX when she arrived from Acapulco. She blamed me for John's crash..."if only John would not ride with you younger people." If that gave her comfort, so be it. But, John out-rode me...on every ride I ever had the good fortune of riding with him.
However, it's about a helmet; not about a new a tire.
 

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A sad story.

Yesterday at the tail end of a 50 mile ride I felt the rear triangle of my bike
behaving funny. It appeared that my brake shoe was rubbing against the
sidewall of the rim but I finally realized when I pulled over and took a look
that my rear skewer had somehow loosened and the rear axle was nearly
out of the drops!

Yeesh! Terrifying. I reseated it and insured it was tightly fitted but that
could have been something I found out at speed.

Be careful out there eh?
 

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broken beer bottle

aliensporebomb said:
A sad story.

Yesterday at the tail end of a 50 mile ride I felt the rear triangle of my bike
behaving funny. It appeared that my brake shoe was rubbing against the
sidewall of the rim but I finally realized when I pulled over and took a look
that my rear skewer had somehow loosened and the rear axle was nearly
out of the drops!

Yeesh! Terrifying. I reseated it and insured it was tightly fitted but that
could have been something I found out at speed.

Be careful out there eh?
When I later examined John Evan's flat tire, the gash into the "side-wall"--
non-road contact area of the tire--from the broken beer bottle caused the
blow out forcing the front wheel to drift off the paved surface into the gravel.
 

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New Michelin's tend to be suspect. I've ridden MANY tires,and Michelins have some sort of thin wax coating when they are new. They are the only tire I've had that are like that. It takes a little riding to wear it off. The sandpaper idea is interesting though. I may have to try that...
 

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nonsleepingjon said:
Agreed - new motorcycle tires are like ice. When I put a new rear tire on my road bike, I figured it would be about the same and took it pretty slow for awhile. The trick to scrubbing in tires (moto or bicycle) is to very gradually increase your lean angle through the turns, i.e., go straight for a while, then do some low speed weaving, then increase speed and leaning until the rubber is roughed up. On motorcycles you can judge the skill (insanity?) of the rider by seeing how close to the edge of the tire is roughed up.
Total BS. First, motorcycle tires are not like "ice" when they're new, and the mold release compound does not take 100 miles to clean off. With both bike and motorcycle tires, the mold release compound of today and the amount used is nothing like the old days.

Totally stupid advice is advising people to weave back and forth. Roadracing World and Motorcycle Technology (probably the best, most blunt, motorcycle mag in the world.) did real world testing and completely debunked the weaving crap. All weaving does is make you look stupid and increase the chance of something stupid happening.
 

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Their flat happy nature has lead me to swear off Michelins for my bike- just not worth it. Like their car tires though.

More of a Continental man for the bike. Don't like their car tires though.

Go figure. . .

:biggrin5:
 

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I use Continental's GP 4000s and I've not encountered any issues as of yet. If I take a dump. y'all will be the first to know after the wife and I... :D

Peace :aureola:
 
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