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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Transitioning from running to biking due to lower back issues I am 50yrs old and 5’7” 155 lbs. athletic and in good shape (just a bad back). Until recently I ran 25-30 miles weekly and still hit the gym hard 4-5 times a week. I am looking at the Giant Defy advanced 3, Trek Domane, and Cannondale Synopsis. Have not ridden any of the bikes but plan to in the next few days to ride ea. Obviously comfort will be the most important part for me. Value wise the Giant has a Carbon frame and disk brakes. I am a beginner rider and will primarily use bike for exercise, group rides and maybe some bike challenges but not hard core racing. I don’t do anything easily so I will ride the bike hard I plan to ride at least 20+ miles a few times a week and 40+ on the weekends.Any advice, appreciate any comments?
 

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The most important thing is not which bike you pick between those (they are all in the same ballpark) but how well you are fitted to it. I'd make you primary concern finding the shop that has the best fitter and then worry about which bike you get.

that would go for anyone but double so for someone with back issues that need to be addressed as part of bike fit.
 

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That's cool. See what you think of test rides. There's really no objective way to choose here.....all three bikes are good and in the same league.

I don't want to open up this can of worms but I would say don't let disc brakes sway you. They really don't provide any value for the type of riding you describe.

Those three bikes and be set up fairly aggressively so it's probably N/A but: I assume you want an "endurance bike" because of your back issue and you think being more upright is what you require. That MAY be the case but not necessarily. So again worry about fit first. It could be that an endurance bike is not the best choice if it were to put you too upright.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah endurance for the back comfort. They put me in a more upright position which the Dr recommended. I'll also probably have brake levers added to upper bar so if I need to ride upright I can. Brakes wont steer me, more interested in the carbon frame absorbing bumps better them aluminum.
 

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Yeah endurance for the back comfort. They put me in a more upright position which the Dr recommended. I'll also probably have brake levers added to upper bar so if I need to ride upright I can. Brakes wont steer me, more interested in the carbon frame absorbing bumps better them aluminum.
1. the doctor may be wrong about a more upright position being what you need. For many cyclists, a more stretched-out horizontal position is great for the lower back, strengthening the muscles and avoiding vertical compression loads on the spine. In any event, all the bikes will permit some adjustment of handlebar position as you learn what works for you.

2. I wouldn't go to the extra expense of installing the auxiliary levers until you see whether a hand position on the hoods is sufficient for your comfort and control. And you don't need top levers to ride with hands on the tops -- even if you do end up riding on the tops most of the time, you don't need to have the brake levers in immediate reach all the time to ride safely -- with practice, you can move your hands from the tops to the hoods to reach the levers in a fraction of a second.

3. Frame material doesn't have that much to do with absorbing bumps. The tires do most of that. If you want a softer ride, the simplest and best thing to do is to install larger tires and run them at lower pressure. I think all of those frames will take at least 25mm tires, but if it comes down to a choice between two and one of them has clearance for even larger tires, that's worth considering in case it turns out you want or need a plusher ride in the future.
 
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