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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!

I just realized how much fun riding was over the last week and am interested in buying a bicycle. I am looking to ride on the road mostly with a little trail riding. My budget is small to say the least. What is a good beginner bike or what would you guys recommend. Thanks!
 

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well, if you want trail and road riding your best bet is to start looking for cyclocross bikes. since that is what they are built for, they excel at it. unfortunately, unless you can find one used, they don't start as cheap as most bikes because they kind of a niche market thing. maybe something like this specialized crosstrail sport would suit you, made for commuting, lighter off-road and on...about 600 bucks-

here is an example of a true cyclocross bike, but this will bump you up to 1300 or so...


another idea is to get just an entry level road bike and make sure it's able to handle some slightly thicker tires, like 700x25, then find some commuter tires with some tread on it and you oughtta be able to do light road and trail.

notice the bar position of the first bike though... that flat bar is going to mean you are sitting much more upright than you would be on the second bike... do you want to go fast and keep up with road-bikers? get a bike with drop bars. do you not care about aerodynamics and top speed and just want some fun/fitness? i'd say go with a flat bar commuter.

i had a devinci commuter for 2 or 3 years, great bike, especially for riding in traffic and on unreliable roads... i eventually wanted something a bit more aggresive, though, and bought a full-on road bike. i still take the commuter to work sometimes in bad weather, it can handle hard rain and even some snow with winter tires and i can take some off-road shortcuts that would be sketchy at best with my road bike.

(ps- that specialized commuter and cross bike are just examples, most every big-name manufacturer and even alot of the smaller ones make nice commuters. i posted specialized because chances are a shop near you will stock them,that or trek, as they seem to be the giants as far as american bike makers go.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
tindrum said:
well, if you want trail and road riding your best bet is to start looking for cyclocross bikes. since that is what they are built for, they excel at it. unfortunately, unless you can find one used, they don't start as cheap as most bikes because they kind of a niche market thing. maybe something like this specialized crosstrail sport would suit you, made for commuting, lighter off-road and on...about 600 bucks-

here is an example of a true cyclocross bike, but this will bump you up to 1300 or so...


another idea is to get just an entry level road bike and make sure it's able to handle some slightly thicker tires, like 700x25, then find some commuter tires with some tread on it and you oughtta be able to do light road and trail.

notice the bar position of the first bike though... that flat bar is going to mean you are sitting much more upright than you would be on the second bike... do you want to go fast and keep up with road-bikers? get a bike with drop bars. do you not care about aerodynamics and top speed and just want some fun/fitness? i'd say go with a flat bar commuter.

i had a devinci commuter for 2 or 3 years, great bike, especially for riding in traffic and on unreliable roads... i eventually wanted something a bit more aggresive, though, and bought a full-on road bike. i still take the commuter to work sometimes in bad weather, it can handle hard rain and even some snow with winter tires and i can take some off-road shortcuts that would be sketchy at best with my road bike.

(ps- that specialized commuter and cross bike are just examples, most every big-name manufacturer and even alot of the smaller ones make nice commuters. i posted specialized because chances are a shop near you will stock them,that or trek, as they seem to be the giants as far as american bike makers go.)
Thanks for the reply!

I would say I would focus more on speed than anything. I am looking to commute with the bike but also take it on trips to northern michigan and stuff. Does the "speed" have to do with how fast you would go. Lets say a 24 speed bike would be easier to get into higher speeds than an 18 speed? I would think so...
 

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Speed would come from the motor

kenny_viper2 said:
Thanks for the reply!

I would say I would focus more on speed than anything. I am looking to commute with the bike but also take it on trips to northern michigan and stuff. Does the "speed" have to do with how fast you would go. Lets say a 24 speed bike would be easier to get into higher speeds than an 18 speed? I would think so...
And that would be you. I have been on many a ride on my full on road bike and kit and a hairy legged MTBer with the shorts flappin' in the breeze blows past me. Gearing can be bought to match the terrain you ride. Doubles, triples, compact, cassettes to meet whatever your needs are. MTB and probably cross bikes are designed (when buying a complete bike, not just parts to assemble to a chosen frame) will have lower gearing with the thought being that some hilly terrain will be involved in the use of this bike. My road bikes all have gearing for moderate to extreme hilly conditions, it is where most of my riding is done. They also have just enough top end gearing to go fast too. My problem is I need a more powerful motor.

I would look at cross and touring bikes with drop bars.
 
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