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Maybe he had disk brakes on his mtn bike, another reason to keep it?
Maybe he likes to ride in the rain?
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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If you need to stop your bike 100 times faster than rim brakes, jam a frame pump in the spokes.
Or let a squirrel run through your wheel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
I can’t imagine 200lbs being any threat to decent modern equipment? Modern road bikes, despite their diminutive appearance are super well engineered and very strong.
I would hope so. The frame and fork have good welds and the bike seems well built. I just don't trust light bikes. Being a guy that has been on the heavy side most of his life has lead to many rims becoming untrue after a few hundred miles on normal rides. I was close to 300 a few years ago, I have dropped that down to 200 with weekly rides on the bikes. But you are correct, I might trust the frame and fork, but never a lightweight wheelset. Especially one that is radially laced.
Cheesy caliper rim brakes? Why on earth would you feel the need to stop “100 times faster?” What are you doing on that bike?
What am I doing? Just normal 20 to 40 mile rides around town. Sometimes I visit the next towns over. But I live in the PNW and it rains here a LOT. Those rim brakes are next to useless in the rain. Disc doesn't have that problem.
But rim brakes work great and are less hassle, lighter, more aero and easier to adjust.
Not sure I agree with you. On my mountain bike my brakes are hydraulic. They are self centering, they adjust themselves automatically for pad wear, I can adjust when they bite with a turn of a screw on the lever, and changing the pads is easy as removing one long screw and taking them out from the and dropping a new set in.

Rim brakes need to be adjusted manually for pad wear, always require a perfectly trued rim, Require locating and adjusting the pad just right on the rim surface to avoid squeals in the rain, and in my experience it takes a few minutes to get the brake to evenly hit the rim from both sides.

Disc is the future. Wish my road bike had them.
 

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I would hope so. The frame and fork have good welds and the bike seems well built. I just don't trust light bikes. Being a guy that has been on the heavy side most of his life has lead to many rims becoming untrue after a few hundred miles on normal rides. I was close to 300 a few years ago, I have dropped that down to 200 with weekly rides on the bikes. But you are correct, I might trust the frame and fork, but never a lightweight wheelset. Especially one that is radially laced.
300 lbs is very different from 200 lbs. Great that you were able to lose so much weight. Kudos to you! 300 lbs is definitely too heavy for a road bike. 200 lbs is quite OK. I know quite a few people you are in the low 200's who ride road bikes with no problems. Granted that low spoke wheels are not good for heavier riders, they won't just collapse suddenly under you. More likely when things go wrong, your rear may start popping spokes and rim spoke holes may develop small cracks. Of course once spoke hole cracks occur, that is a junk rim and it becomes a potential hazard. The other problem with low spoke wheels is that if you do pop a spoke on a ride and you are far from home, you will be calling for a ride. On a wheel with a higher spoke count, you can easily adjust other spokes to get the wheel true enough to ride home.

But I live in the PNW and it rains here a LOT. Those rim brakes are next to useless in the rain. Disc doesn't have that problem.
If this is the case, then yes, a disc brake bike would be a better choice. Many road bikes now have disc brakes and all currently made gravel bikes have disc brakes. I'm thinking a gravel bike may be a better choice for you. They are nearly as fast as road bike if you put slick tires on and you can do light off-roading with them. Of course this is sort of after that fact since you already bought a road bike.

Not sure I agree with you. On my mountain bike my brakes are hydraulic. They are self centering, they adjust themselves automatically for pad wear, I can adjust when they bite with a turn of a screw on the lever, and changing the pads is easy as removing one long screw and taking them out from the and dropping a new set in.

Rim brakes need to be adjusted manually for pad wear, always require a perfectly trued rim, Require locating and adjusting the pad just right on the rim surface to avoid squeals in the rain, and in my experience it takes a few minutes to get the brake to evenly hit the rim from both sides.

Disc is the future. Wish my road bike had them.
Yes and no. I rarely need to adjust my rim brakes. And as I stated before, if your wheels are going out of true, they were poorly built wheels. One of the wheel sets I built has almost 8000 miles on it and I have never, ever had to re-true them since I built them. I'm 170 lbs, so only 30 lbs lighter than you. I am confident they would work for a 200 lb rider as well.

I have hydraulic discs on my gravel bike. They do have more stopping power and better modulation, but on dry roads, rim brakes work just fine.
 

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Just keep riding... if the bike fits and you find some routes in the area you like you'll be happy.

The bike you bought is fine, but if you really get into it, based on what you've said about your background you might want to switch to a CX / gravel bike down the line. Then you can get a bike that will be fine on pavement but also be able to venture onto trails and such.
 

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Sure, disc brakes have their place... It’s on MTB. I love mine. I ride in snow and ice and they are great. I also beach ride, where I don’t even touch my brakes... On a road bike, please... Give your braking an extra second... Rim brakes work just fine. Sure, if you descend mountains in the rain then discs are OK. But I think it’s interesting that Ineos is on full-team rim brakes regardless of riding conditions? Chris Froome won a TdF largely on a decent and, shockingly, using rim brakes? Maybe you are a stronger cyclist that needs the disc advantage? Froome has only won a half dozen or more world tours on rim brakes? Disc might be the future because buyers are strangled by the lack of choice. Rim brakes work great. World tours have been won on them. And yes, even with rain and snow. They might require a minuscule level of improved skill, but hey, you still skirt the aero, weight and other disadvantages.
 
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I'd rather talk about chain lube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Rim brakes work great. World tours have been won on them. And yes, even with rain and snow.
Oh please. Dual pivot caliper brakes we see on road bike aren't even as powerful as V-Brakes on low end bikes much less disc brakes. Guess I ride differently then all of you. I use my brakes a LOT especially in traffic around town. I'm not one of these guys that gets out on the backroads and pedals for miles so yes, strong brakes that stop on a dime are important.
 

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My brakes are campy chorus rim brakes. The stopping power they offer, if I apply them hard enough, is beyond my ability to stay attached to the bike.😁 I do a decent amount of city riding, and riding in hilly areas. Never once have I felt that I needed more stopping power and/or more modulation. Dry or even wet. I get confused about all the anti-rim-brake fervor.
 

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My brakes are campy chorus rim brakes. The stopping power they offer, if I apply them hard enough, is beyond my ability to stay attached to the bike.😁 I do a decent amount of city riding, and riding in hilly areas. Never once have I felt that I needed more stopping power and/or more modulation. Dry or even wet. I get confused about all the anti-rim-brake fervor.
Similar experience (except for wet pads, they are the most compelling argument for discs there is, imho); I ride similar conditions as you do, and my brakes have never been the limiter on my bike.
 

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Oh please. Dual pivot caliper brakes we see on road bike aren't even as powerful as V-Brakes on low end bikes much less disc brakes. Guess I ride differently then all of you. I use my brakes a LOT especially in traffic around town. I'm not one of these guys that gets out on the backroads and pedals for miles so yes, strong brakes that stop on a dime are important.
Well it appears braking power is what you want and your current bike doesn't have that. Since you have a rim brake road bike, you will either need to sell it and get a disc brake bike.......or........

Get different calipers and pads. As others have been saying, rim brakes have plenty of stopping power unless it is wet. My guess is you have some house brand of calipers. I have an older 2007 road bike which had these cheap Cane Creek calipers. I replaced them with TRP calipers and what a difference!! Like night and day!
 

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Oh please. Dual pivot caliper brakes we see on road bike aren't even as powerful as V-Brakes on low end bikes much less disc brakes. Guess I ride differently then all of you. I use my brakes a LOT especially in traffic around town. I'm not one of these guys that gets out on the backroads and pedals for miles so yes, strong brakes that stop on a dime are important.
OK, so a planned attack on a decent on the biggest stage in bicycle racing... A higher cog chain ring... Rim brakes. If there existed a situation where any/every marginal gain was available, this is it. Wait, but it was dry? Oh, Ineos just won a very wet Dauphine. Wait... On rim brakes.

Oh please... LOL


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OK, so a planned attack on a decent on the biggest stage in bicycle racing... A higher cog chain ring... Rim brakes. If there existed a situation where any/every marginal gain was available, this is it. Wait, but it was dry? Oh, Ineos just won a very wet Dauphine. Wait... On rim brakes.

Oh please... LOL
Why do you and others here keep comparing pro racers to us ordinary folk? Keep in mind they have skills most of us don't and certainly beginners don't.

And.......as I stated, the OP may just have a very inferior set of calipers. I'm sure Froome had diffent brakes anyway. But enough of Froome and other pro racers. They get the very best equipment and they get it for free from sponsors. And remember, bikes don't win races, riders do.

So let's stop with the rim brake / disc brake arguments and argue over what really matters - chain lube! 👍
 

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Why do you and others here keep comparing pro racers to us ordinary folk? Keep in mind they have skills most of us don't and certainly beginners don't.

And.......as I stated, the OP may just have a very inferior set of calipers.

So let's stop with the rim brake / disc brake arguments and argue over what really matters - chain lube!
Hahaha! My point is simply, yes, they work well but in situations where super human stopping ability may actually matter, super human riders don’t even bother...


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They are the only pro tour team still on rim.
Interesting.
Sponsor pressure vs marginal gains? I’d guess it’s all in the wheel changes, but I’m guessing... If disc was indeed a marginal gain, Brailsford would join the club?


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Bar position and bar style are entirely different topics. Because you are talking about throwing on "riser" bars I assume you are really talking about the former not necessarily the type of bar. If that's correct and you are trying to raise your hand position beyond where you can get the tops of drop bars then you are wrong about having a bike with a good fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Get different calipers and pads. As others have been saying, rim brakes have plenty of stopping power unless it is wet. My guess is you have some house brand of calipers.
Nope. Shimano 105. In fact the whole bike has the complete Shimano 105 group with the exception of the FSA crank and BB.

Bar position and bar style are entirely different topics. Because you are talking about throwing on "riser" bars I assume you are really talking about the former not necessarily the type of bar. If that's correct and you are trying to raise your hand position beyond where you can get the tops of drop bars then you are wrong about having a bike with a good fit.
I was talking about style. In the MTB world riser bars are a style of bar. I saw some drop bars that have a riser-like bend in them. My bike fit is perfect, I just want a more upright riding position. Don't like riding hunched over.
 
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