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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone.
I have been riding now for four years. I ride all year round on the road and mountain. I orginally mountain biked when my riding buddy let me borrow his road bike once and I got the bug, went out and bought a road bike of my own.
Whenever I ride in a group be it road or mountain, I'm usually one of the guy taking up the back. For 2011 all this is going to change. I have never trained before and don't have a clue where to start. So far all I've done is ride.
I have both Friel Cyclist's traning bible and Carmichael's Ultimate ride books, and heart rate monitor. Don't have a powermeter at the time that out of my price range. I can put in 4-5 day of training a week.
I want to do everything in 2011 right and wanted some advice on where to start. Thanks
 

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Impulse Athletic Coaching
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Kendogz161 said:
Hello everyone.
I have been riding now for four years. I ride all year round on the road and mountain. I orginally mountain biked when my riding buddy let me borrow his road bike once and I got the bug, went out and bought a road bike of my own.
Whenever I ride in a group be it road or mountain, I'm usually one of the guy taking up the back. For 2011 all this is going to change. I have never trained before and don't have a clue where to start. So far all I've done is ride.
I have both Friel Cyclist's traning bible and Carmichael's Ultimate ride books, and heart rate monitor. Don't have a powermeter at the time that out of my price range. I can put in 4-5 day of training a week.
I want to do everything in 2011 right and wanted some advice on where to start. Thanks
A coach.
 

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Assuming you have an adequate aerobic base, try to establish an annual training plan based on Friel's book and strive towards accomplishing those goals.


A power meter would really help your training. Try to get one because it will change everything.
 

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What are you training for? "take it to the next level" is not a meaningful goal.

Read Friel's chapters on goal and objective setting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My goals for next year are to do at least two century ride, I have never done one. To finish at the top three of a sunday mountain bike group ride I do with friends, the ride about 4 hours and want to finish on top of some of the 30 to 50 mile road rides I do with a group.
I read up on power meter and looks very helpful but it looks like the package would be at least $2,000. Can't spend that money right now.
From reading the training book I am trying to get a plan together where I do some work at the gym, build a base and do some on the bike workouts. Before all I knew was ride alot and do hills. So all this will be a first for me. I know there be some learning with it.
 

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Kendogz161 said:
My goals for next year are to do at least two century ride, I have never done one. To finish at the top three of a sunday mountain bike group ride I do with friends, the ride about 4 hours and want to finish on top of some of the 30 to 50 mile road rides I do with a group.
I read up on power meter and looks very helpful but it looks like the package would be at least $2,000. Can't spend that money right now.
From reading the training book I am trying to get a plan together where I do some work at the gym, build a base and do some on the bike workouts. Before all I knew was ride alot and do hills. So all this will be a first for me. I know there be some learning with it.

$2000 for a power meter? You must be looking at Quarq or SRM. The powertap is much more affordable and is very reliable. Typically you can buy a powertap and wheel new at a store for about 1200-1400, and used you can probably haggle down to about $700-800 (for a wireless, subtract 100-200 for wired).

But as far as those goals are concerned:
1) Build up the amount of volume you do when riding, eventually you should be able to work your way up to a century.
2) Mountain bike goals are really up to you. I suggest working on core/upperbody strength as it will help you with technical sections.
3) Work up the intensity in your volume rides. Use a HRM to establish training zones and try to focus on upping the effort within those zones. Remember to use a smooth pedal stroke.

For those goals, a powermeter may not really be necessary, but it certainly can help.
 

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yep, and hr if you sport the band. the little yellow computer included is fine as well. some will pick up another ant+ garmin computer but you don't need it. Just remember its a training wheel and a velocity or dt swiss rim is fine (somewhat bombproof as well) ... you could get one with a Zipp rim but why bother ;)
 

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It's utter BS that you need a power meter.

You need to ride more, ride harder, sleep more, and eat healthy. A power meter does none of those things.

Do something every day. If it's not riding, then run, swim, climb, or hike. Every day. Focus on your day-to-day practice. Gadgets like power meters will only help you if you already have a solid, daily, sustainable, holistic practice of riding, rest, nutrition, sleep, and work sorted out. Otherwise, a power meter will only make you hate riding and hate yourself.
 

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pretender said:
It's utter BS that you need a power meter.

You need to ride more, ride harder, sleep more, and eat healthy. A power meter does none of those things.

Do something every day. If it's not riding, then run, swim, climb, or hike. Every day. Focus on your day-to-day practice. Gadgets like power meters will only help you if you already have a solid, daily, sustainable, holistic practice of riding, rest, nutrition, sleep, and work sorted out. Otherwise, a power meter will only make you hate riding and hate yourself.
^^^Do this!^^^
 

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I would advise a coach or reading the books you have bought. A lot of people like hiring a coach because it makes them accountable and allows them to not worry about planning every workout. If you are the analytical "have to know why type" reading the books and learning why you are doing what you are doing might be the better option.

Good luck,
 

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A power meter is definitely not essential for getting fast on a bike. And I own a PM.

Pretender's advice is spot on.

My advice: be consistent. Missing a day of training is like ripping half a page out of a book. The story doesn't change much, if at all. However, if you're ripping pages out, i.e. blowing off riding because of weather, work pressures, etc., the plot line suffers greatly.

Set a schedule that can work with your real life and stick to it. You'll figure it out, but try to shoot for at least 7-10 quality hours a week on the bike.
 

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Ghost234 said:
But as far as those goals are concerned:
1) Build up the amount of volume you do when riding, eventually you should be able to work your way up to a century.
2) Mountain bike goals are really up to you. I suggest working on core/upperbody strength as it will help you with technical sections.
3) Work up the intensity in your volume rides. Use a HRM to establish training zones and try to focus on upping the effort within those zones. Remember to use a smooth pedal stroke.

For those goals, a powermeter may not really be necessary, but it certainly can help.
1. yes, gradually increase what you do - the trick is a gradual increase when new. Add 15-min/week until you have no more time to ride, then start making the rides a bit harder.

2. I suggest riding the MTB to get better for that. Better training than time doing other workouts

3. Yes, except don't worry about the pedal stroke. Make sure your bike is well fitted to you and ride lots. With enough hard work in the mix and a well fitted bike, the pedaling action will look after itself.
 
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