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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm on a standard crank with a 10-speed 12-25 cassette. I know fitness plays a big part but I'm still thawing from Winter and having a tough time on the bigger hills around me. Will swapping out to a 11-28 make a noticeable difference? I can get my hands on an Ultergra cassette for cheap and want to know if it's worth the effort to switch?

Next question:
I am fairly muscular with broad shoulders. I've been riding wide bars on my mountain bikes for 20 years and feel way too compressed on the road bike. I believe the bars are 42cm (how do I measure?). Is it a matter of getting used to drop bars or should I get some 46cm bars?

Thanks!
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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I'm on a standard crank with a 10-speed 12-25 cassette. I know fitness plays a big part but I'm still thawing from Winter and having a tough time on the bigger hills around me. Will swapping out to a 11-28 make a noticeable difference? I can get my hands on an Ultergra cassette for cheap and want to know if it's worth the effort to switch?
Going on the assumption that by standard crankset you mean 53/39, going from a 25T to 28T cog represents a 12% change. Not knowing your fitness level and terrain, just how noticeable the difference will be is hard to say, but if you coped with the 25 last season, chances are a 28T will be enough till you 'thaw'. :)

Odds are good your RD will handle the 28T cog, but if you look on the back, the model should be stamped. Post that and we may be able to give you some other options - like running a 30T.

Next question:
I am fairly muscular with broad shoulders. I've been riding wide bars on my mountain bikes for 20 years and feel way too compressed on the road bike. I believe the bars are 42cm (how do I measure?). Is it a matter of getting used to drop bars or should I get some 46cm bars?
Thanks!
If you consider yourself broad shouldered, I'd say a 42cm bar is too narrow for you, but before spending any money, measure to be sure.

Below is a link to some info on drop bars (#7). Bars are generally measured center to center, at the drops.

Bike Fit Fitting A Bicycle Seat Adjustment Height Reach Tips by Jim Langley
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I'm running a 53/39. I just picked up a GIANT TCR. This will be the first road bike with drop bars I've ridden in 20 years. I've been strictly a mountain biker and now I'm looking to get into road riding - for fitness and convenience mostly. 12% seems like a good amount so I'm going to swap out the cassette.

So the drop bars should be measured from the inside, at the very end of the bars where the tape plugs are located? I appreciate the website you mentioned but it isn't clear on the handlebar width measurements ...and it's pretty dated. :)

Thanks again.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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So the drop bars should be measured from the inside, at the very end of the bars where the tape plugs are located? I appreciate the website you mentioned but it isn't clear on the handlebar width measurements ...and it's pretty dated. :)

Thanks again.
Yes, that's why I added instructions on how to measure the bars. The site is dated, but IMO best practices of bike fit aren't fads or to be updated 'just cuz'.

For handlebars, "center to center" means the center of the bar (the tube) on one side to the center of the bar on the other side.
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Going on the assumption that by standard crankset you mean 53/39, going from a 25T to 28T cog represents a 12% change. Not knowing your fitness level and terrain, just how noticeable the difference will be is hard to say, but if you coped with the 25 last season, chances are a 28T will be enough till you 'thaw'. :)

Odds are good your RD will handle the 28T cog, but if you look on the back, the model should be stamped. Post that and we may be able to give you some other options - like running a 30T.


If you consider yourself broad shouldered, I'd say a 42cm bar is too narrow for you, but before spending any money, measure to be sure.

Below is a link to some info on drop bars (#7). Bars are generally measured center to center, at the drops.

Bike Fit Fitting A Bicycle Seat Adjustment Height Reach Tips by Jim Langley
Bookmarked the link. Thanks
 
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