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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I've been lurking here for a while but never registered--love the site.

I am very impressed with the quality of advice which led me to register and ask for some myself.

I'm looking to replace the Mavic cxp22's that came with a used Allez Elite I purchased on ebay. The stock hubs are in need of overhaul, which I plan to do but I want to keep them and the rims as set spares.

I am looking a purchasing a set of Zipp 101's from wheelbuilders.com but wanted a sanity check before I pulled the trigger--it's my first time purchasing new rims and there seems to be a lot to consider.

How do the zipp's hold up on a heavier rider and has anyone done business with wheelbuilders.com?

I assume that I need a higher spoke count to compensate for my weight or at least that's what I've been reading on the inter-tubes.

Should I go for the DT Swiss 240's or the Zipp 88's?

About me: I'm a new rider, say 6 months in the saddle, am 183cm tall and weigh 100kg. I put in about 100km a week and 60km rides on the weekends when I'm not spearfishing :p
 

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Do yourseld a favor and stay away from 18 and 20 spoke builds no matter what the rim is. Some may argue that Zipp rates these things for riders up to 250 lbs but, unless there is a compelling reason to push the envelope for the sake of saving a few grams, recreational riding does not justify such compromise on durability.

My advise, for wharever is worth to you, is to go with a 23x24-28 rim and 24f/28r or 28f/32r spokes. The later may be a bit overbuilt but will not slow your clubriding down.

Your Specialized has a Shimano 10 speed drivetrain so ask your wheelbuilder on recomendations about your weight, your riding style, the bracing angle of the spoke, the tension ratio betwen DS/NDS and the resulting lateral stiffness of the wheel based on the hub geometry and the lacing pattern and number of spokes he suggested. This is what you need know/discuss to make an informed decision on what hub to use. Expect your wheelbuilder to be fluent in explaining what these things mean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. Well, I would go down to the local shop but I live in Japan and my Japanese is passable but not for technical issues like bike stuff. I've been to the local Specialized dealer but I got the feeling that they would rather spend time on the club riders and the guys that spend money on a regular basis. I can go back, not a big deal as I don't give up easily.

So, that leaves me to scour the internet looking for tidbits of information so I can arm myself with sound advise and make an informed purchase.

Has anyone done business with wheelbuilder? Have any experience as a heavier rider? Suggestions on wheels? I'm not dead-set on the Zipps.

Thanks for everyones help in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Pulled up Mike's site and am reading it now--lots to digest. I'll think I'll wait to spend money until I've read through what he has and then decide.

There's some posts of folks having success on building their own wheels so that's encouraging. I'm not the mechanical type but hate to spend money where I can save and do it myself, plus it's a pride thing.
 

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You might save some, but, there are many more benefits than just the small amount of savings. You will learn how to build a wheel. Having built the wheel, you will be more familiar with how to REPAIR the wheel if it needs it (follow Mike's stress relief tips and you probably won't have to repair it). You'll be able to build your own wheels to suit your needs no matter what language they speak in the country you're in. It is a worthwhile endeavor.
 

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Now you complicate things, at least for me, as I don't know the Japanese market. I've heard of the Araya rims but never seen anything more than pictures.

For your weight of 220 lbs and rec riding I would suggest an aluminum clincher in the 450-480 grams range, 23mm wide x 24 to 28 mm deep like the Kinlin 23x28, H+Son Archetype 23x25, HED C2 23x24, Pacenti SL23 to list some of the more popular here. The Pacenti may be the most difficult to find in Japan being really new and kind of a custom order with limited supply. Front hoop with 28 or 32 drillings and rear hoop with 32. That's a good all-around rim.

For spokes I would suggest double butted 14/15 ga. like the Sapim Race. Lace them 3x/3x for the rear and 2x for the front if you go with 28 spokes or 3x if you go 32. I would also suggest brass nipples over aluminum as they will allow the builder to put a bit more tension if the wheel needs it and also be more durable if you live near the coast.

Being in Japan, Shimano hubs may be a natural choice. If you have a Shimano 10 speed drivetrain, the Durace 7900 is a very good choice because of its quality and its geometry. Your 220lbs need a bit of attention in selecting a hub with better geometry that will help optimize the balance between a stiff but stable/durable wheel. A wheel with a NDS/DS bracing angle ratio of around 2.0 will be a good compromise between lateral stiffness and enough tension on the NDS spokes for stability and durability. A NDS tension of 60+kgf is good to keep the NDS spokes tight but the higher the better (that's also where the brass nipples come handy to drive the DS spoke tension around 125-130kgf). Several of the above recommendations are more crucial to riders of your weight than those in the 170lbs range so take them as you wish.

Finish these wheels with a set of 25mm tires inflated to 95f/115r or even experiment with a 28mm in the rear at 100psi (check your chainstays for clearance) and you will be ready to roll.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
dcgriz, thanks for the very informative reply. That's a lot of good info! Looking at a DT Swiss 585 at the moment. Seems like a lot of heavy riders are using them with success.

BTW, I spend a good deal of time running, weightlifting and riding and just happen to be a big guy or at least big for a typical rider.
 

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The 585 is a rigid rim that combined with a rigid spoke arrangement will build to a very robust wheel; nice for the flats but unnecessarily heavy for climbing. The rims I suggested will give you more of a do-it-all wheel in addition of accommodating wider tires more efficiently.

I'm a big guy as well and I would not change it for anything; we just have to make these wheels right for our use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The 585's are about a 100g more heavy, other than the weight difference is there anything else that would make these bad at climbing? I ask because I'm completely stupid on the subject. Does the rigidity play a factor?
 

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The 585's are about a 100g more heavy, other than the weight difference is there anything else that would make these bad at climbing? I ask because I'm completely stupid on the subject. Does the rigidity play a factor?
Not bad but unnecessarily heavy. Rim rigidity plays a factor but wheel stiffness is better addressed when there is synergy between rim rim rigidity and spoke rigidity. Wheel stiffness is a more important consideration for heavier and powerful riders especially if their riding style accentuates lateral or torsional movement. An example of that would be getting up when climbing or sprinting and rocking the bike side to side, mashing vs. high cadence, etc.
A rim like the 585 gets its relative higher rigidity from its deeper profile while a shorter profile but wider width rim like the HED or Archetype from both width and depth when compared to a standard narrow, short profile rim. The end result of either rim is acceptable , when properly laced, at least to my use and the wider rim does it at a lesser weight, not that I ever count grams but when it comes to wheels, a lot of unfortunate things are happening because of grams.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Not bad but unnecessarily heavy. Rim rigidity plays a factor but wheel stiffness is better addressed when there is synergy between rim rim rigidity and spoke rigidity. Wheel stiffness is a more important consideration for heavier and powerful riders especially if their riding style accentuates lateral or torsional movement. An example of that would be getting up when climbing or sprinting and rocking the bike side to side, mashing vs. high cadence, etc.
A rim like the 585 gets its relative higher rigidity from its deeper profile while a shorter profile but wider width rim like the HED or Archetype from both width and depth when compared to a standard narrow, short profile rim. The end result of either rim is acceptable , when properly laced, at least to my use and the wider rim does it at a lesser weight, not that I ever count grams but when it comes to wheels, a lot of unfortunate things are happening because of grams.

Thanks for the info. I'm tracking on the wider logic and will look more into the others you mentioned. I have access to the US Postal so I don't have to "only" buy from JDM. Little Japanese guys are hard to catch going up but I always get them coming down. Haha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Been a few weeks but I wanted to wrap this up with a thank you to dcgriz for giving me the information I needed to purchase a new set of rims. I elected not to build them myself because I don't have a lot of time or space in my Japanese home for equipment--but that argument aside I'm the new owner of a set of HED C2 rims and Shimano Dura-Ace FH-9000 hubs.


Pic of the sexy steed attached.


Thanks again for the help.

View attachment 280441
 
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