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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After helping my son build his fixie last weekend, I've decided to convert one of my old bikes.

What I'll be working with is an old Paramount frame that currently has 7-speed on it.

Questions:

1) I'm thinking about buying a real single speed rear wheel and keeping my current front wheel which has a quick release. Do all single speed rear hubs use nuts as opposed to quick releases? If so there is probably a reason? I'm not concerned about theft of a wheel as I'll not be leaving the bike unattended during my rides.

2) Living in the panhandle of Texas, we have a lot of out and back rides with wind. Any suggestions on gears? The current crankset has 53/39.

3) The bike has SPD-SL pedals like my other bikes. Any reason to go to a platform pedal? I don't intend to do trackstands or any other tricks on the bike.

4) Any other suggestions/comments?
 

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Yo no fui.
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1) Most single speed hubs use nuts for greater clamping force on horizontal dropouts to avoid slipping.

2) Check the Sheldon Brown online gear calculator. Most people use around 70 gear inches. I use a 48x18 and previously used a 48x16, which tends to be on the high side.

3) No reason fo platforms, unles you want them, but I find it very nice to be commected to the bike, especially on a fixed gear.

4) Check the sticky.
 

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1. But QR's work fine, too, as long as you use one with sufficient clamping force.

2. Gearing depends on your fitness, too. The 70 inch is a good starting point. If you use your existing small ring, 39x15 is in the ballpark.

3. It's very good to be attached to the pedals in some way on a fixie, and most people find it easier to get in and out of clipless than toeclips, so you might want to keep the SPD-SL's.

Is the existing wheel a freehub or a freewheel? If the latter, you could unthread the freewheel and just thread on a cog. You'd probably have to re-space the axle and re-dish the wheel, but it's a cheap conversion. Some people call this a "suicide hub," but you can use it safely if you use brakes and don't rely on backpressure for stopping. My own fixies are built this way, and I've never had a problem. Read Sheldon for more info.

Does the frame have horizontal dropouts? That makes things a lot easier.

Where are you in the Panhandle? My mother grew up in Pampa, and I used to visit my (now deceased) grandparents there often. I have an uncle who still lives in Amarillo. The wind does blow there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Looking at speed/cadence/gear charts, the 70 inch seems very appropriate.

My wheels have a freewheel, but I really want to be able to apply back pressure even though I'm keeping the brakes. A true "fixie", not just a single speed, although I'll likely use a hub with a single speed on the other side.

The frame does have horizontal dropouts with Campy adjusters to make the wheel line up easy.

Amarillo is home.
 

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Amarillo is a great town. All my mom's family is from there and I spent many a summer and other times there with them. One of my best friends went to Tascosa. I like Ama. You'll need to have a rear wheel built. I had Harris Cyclery build me a set with high flange Harris (really IRO - I like Harris' logo in Texas) hubs - flip flop fixed one side and ss the other, and Open Pro rims. Their prices are real reasonable. I'm using a sugino rd crankset; 3/32 regular size chain. Paramount would make a killer fixed. I'd get a set of wheels though, but that's just my taste. Just be sure your chainline is correct - straight. I do not know how you'd calculate it off your present crankset. Somebody on the board will though. I'm partial to toe clips since I ride to the gym and to work a lot and hate to hassle with different shoes. You'll love the ride. Post some photos when you're done.
 

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Just Riding Along
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Most fixed gear hubs have track nuts...

and solid axles so you rarely get a choice to use a skewer if you buy a wheel with a true fixed gear hub (or flip/flop, as you seem to be planning for.) I believe Phil offers a hub with a nut or head that has an allen fitting. I don't know what advantages they offer, but I do know you can't spread peanut butter with an allen wrench.....
 
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