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What's everyone's preference?

  • Trek Emonda SLR OCLV 800

  • Pinarello Dogma F12

  • Colgnago C64

  • Dura Ace

  • Ultegra

  • Disc Brakes

  • Rim Brakes

  • Tubeless

  • Clinchers

  • Speedplay Pedals

  • Shimano Pedals

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Trek, Felt F1, Shimano Ultegra, Mavic K's
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Roadbike Review, nice to virtually meet everyone,

My bike was stolen last week (pics attached, setup Ultegra), it was an older ride but many hours in the saddle and personal customizations make it difficult to let go.

I’m trying to replace it as soon as possible, hard to do with everything out of stock due to the pandemic, opinions & recommendations are greatly appreciated (so far narrowed it down to 3 frame options below):

I ride roughly 150-200 miles a week, weekdays are flats and weekends are climbs. I’m 5’11” with a slightly larger torso and as I’ve gotten older my setup is less aero than it used to be. My approach is to research a ton, invest wisely in the best, take very good care of it and keep for 10+ years.

Here’s the rub, I’ve tested the Emonda and I can ride away with it this weekend (from a shop I've never worked with before). Because of the industry’s supply & demand issues, the Pinarello and Colnago are anywhere from 4-8 months wait (from a shop owner I've trusted for years), however, he doesn't have anything in my size right now to test ride and I’ve never been on an Italian frame before.

  • Trek Emonda SLR OCLV 800 (size 56)
  • Pinarello Dogma F12 (size 54)
  • Colgnago C64 (size TBD)

And since I've been away from the technology for so long:

  • Carbon Wheelset recommendations?
  • Dura Ace or Ultegra to save a few bucks?
  • Disc or Rim brakes?
  • Tubeless or Clinchers?
  • SpeedPlay or Shimano pedals?


Thank you in advance!


478149
478150
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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12,607 Posts
My advice would be to test ride lots of bikes and buy the one that fits you best and the one you like the feel of best.

Don't fall into the one brand is better than another. There are many great brands out there. Colnago and Pinarello are fancy names, but no better than Trek and many others. I also would not buy a bike I can't test ride first.
 

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Trek, Felt F1, Shimano Ultegra, Mavic K's
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for your reply. My thinking is in line with yours, its just a frustrating time to be without a bike, nothing available to test and product delivery times pushed out to Summer 2020 and even early 2022.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Thank you for your reply. My thinking is in line with yours, its just a frustrating time to be without a bike, nothing available to test and product delivery times pushed out to Summer 2020 and even early 2022.
And just to add that if you are 5' 11" with a long torso, a 54 will be too small. A 56 is your size.

I say ride away on that Trek Emonda. You can't buy back 4-8 months off the bike.

Ultegra and even 105 are both a good bang for the buck, Dura-Ace isn't worth the extra $$ and the Dura-Ace cassette wears out quickly because it's Ti.

I also don't think carbon wheels are worth the extra $$. There are many great quality lightweight alloy wheel sets out there

Rim vs disc brakes? If you ride in rain and wet roads a lot, disc brakes are nice. Otherwise, buy the one you liked that you test rode - both are good.

I'm not a fan of tubeless - especially on road bikes. I use tubes and get a flat less than once a year with 3000 miles of riding.
 

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Trek, Felt F1, Shimano Ultegra, Mavic K's
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Discussion Starter #5
And just to add that if you are 5' 11" with a long torso, a 54 will be too small. A 56 is your size.
Thank you again, I appreciate the feedback!

  • My torso is only slightly longer, 56 is for the Trek and Pinarello's geometry is slightly different hence the 54.
  • I agree on Ultegra, I've never used Dura Ace and don't think I'm missing much as a non racer.
  • For better or worse, Trek is only offering the Emonda with disc brakes this year.
  • I'm curious about tubeless, less rolling resistance and a bit more comfort, albeit a little heavier.

I'm also trying to add a little more comfort to the Emonda wherever I can. Its a stiff race ready frame, but according to reviews not as uncomfortable as Pinarello's 2021 redesign of the Dogma.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Thank you again, I appreciate the feedback!

  • My torso is only slightly longer, 56 is for the Trek and Pinarello's geometry is slightly different hence the 54.
  • I agree on Ultegra, I've never used Dura Ace and don't think I'm missing much as a non racer.
  • For better or worse, Trek is only offering the Emonda with disc brakes this year.
  • I'm curious about tubeless, less rolling resistance and a bit more comfort, albeit a little heavier.

I'm also trying to add a little more comfort to the Emonda wherever I can. Its a stiff race ready frame, but according to reviews not as uncomfortable as Pinarello's 2021 redesign of the Dogma.
Tubeless tires are stiffer rubber and therefore will be less comfrtable. The advantage to tubeless is no pinch flats.

If you are looking for more comfort, put the widest tires that you can fit. Wider tires require less pressure, so that helps too.

Or if you don't mind a more relaxed position on the bike, the Trek Domane has a more comfortable ride.
 

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Tubeless tires are stiffer rubber and therefore will be less comfrtable.
Not true. Not all tubeless tires are stiff thick uncomfortable boat anchors. For instance, Conti GP 5000 tubeless are more supple than the tubed version. Once you put a tube in, the tubed version weighs more and has higher rolling resistance and more friction between the casing and tube. That means... the tubed version is less comfortable. Pretty much every modern tubeless tire will have less rolling resistance and more comfortable than it's equivalent tubed version.

GP5000 Tubed
Tubed: 321 grams
(tire + inner tube)
GP5000 TL
Tubeless: 315 grams
(tire + valve + rim seal)


The advantage to tubeless is no pinch flats
Yup. And puncture flats as well.
I've been running tubeless for over 5 years. Schwalbe Pro One and GP 5000. Year round. 10's of thousands of miles. I haven't had one flat. I will never used tubes again.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Yup. And puncture flats as well.
I've been running tubeless for over 5 years. Schwalbe Pro One and GP 5000. Year round. 10's of thousands of miles. I haven't had one flat. I will never used tubes again.
I guess you are luckier than the guy I rode with who hit a pothole (unavoidable because of traffic). Both tires destroyed, a sealant bath and an Uber ride home. Granted the tires were paper thin race tires.
 

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I guess you are luckier than the guy I rode with who hit a pothole (unavoidable because of traffic). Both tires destroyed, a sealant bath and an Uber ride home. Granted the tires were paper thin race tires.
And that result would have been exactly the same with tubed tires.

But as I said... "punctures". Not catastrophic accidents. Nobody ever claimed that. But I have hit potholes that I know would've pinch flatted tubes many times.

I've had one sidewall slice from hitting a rock. The exact same thing would've happened with a tubed tire. Booted the tire, put in a tube, finished 30miles.
 
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