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I'm old enough to remember when we just rode bikes.
 

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I'm old enough to remember when we just rode bikes.
We're in an age now in which collecting data, texts and images for posting on some social network is often more important than experiencing the actual ride. It's annoying that you have to ride in order to post something. But I'm sure someone is already working on that problem.
 

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^^^yep. Looking at a screen rather than focusing on line and speed coming into a corner will have the opposite affect on those that are bad with line and speed coming into a corner.

Yes, I'm a member of the department of redundancy department:)
 

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*braking
**You're
***Losing

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Thank you. My jaw has unclenched now.

The article actually sounds like the device might make sense for a training device, at least for downhill mtb racers.

BTW, it doesn't measure braking CAPACITY, or power for that matter. Rather, it records where and when and for how long you brake, and how hard. It's for training a DH racer to brake in a way that minimizes speed losses while still allowing safe negotiation of the course.
 

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I have a calibrated strain gauge inserted where the sun don't shine to measure the sphincter pucker factor.
 

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I believe the bigger problem for us amateurs is turning in too early then having to micro correct.
 

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Is that a strain gauge attached to the rotor??

Why not just a tiny pressure sensor plumbed into your hydro brake system? Sounds easy enough to implement, you just have to give it ANT+ or Bluetooth to transmit the data. It could sit right next to your brake lever on the handlebar, or even integrate into it. There should be a direct correlation between the system pressure and how hard the piston is clamping. Sure, different pads and rotors or the amount of heat in the system would affect things a bit, but you could calculate for that.
 

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With pre-riding the courses and now this braking power meter, I should be able to finish in the top 20 of the Gran Fondos I attend.
 

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We're in an age now in which collecting data, texts and images for posting on some social network is often more important than experiencing the actual ride. It's annoying that you have to ride in order to post something. But I'm sure someone is already working on that problem.
nonsense. you can be "experiencing the actual ride" and collect data at the same time. No one is forcing you to look at it during the ride. just as no one is forcing you to check your phone while riding.
 

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If you know the course, you can dial in your braking very well with such data. Auto racers do. So a crit course, maybe. On a road course, ain't no one knows every corner in every detail, so there will always be some non-efficient braking going on. "I think I just need to scrub a little speed on this....AHHHHHH WRONG CORNER BRAKE BRAKE BRAKE!!!!"

I could see it being useful for training riders to know just how late they can brake before different corners, to get riders used to the experience. Work a series of corners, keep working them until it's right. Or until they can't go faster.

We all know the best way to brake, right? Late + hard + short duration braking is fastest. Show a racer the data that shows another rider carried more speed, and they will chase that result. So with the data, it would be easier to get people to push things a bit further.

"Bob, who weights what you weigh, hit the brakes 15 feet closer to the turn than you, was on them 0.25 seconds less, and was 2mph faster on the exit because of it."

Or whatever.

You can always go faster through a corner. Until you can't. The data would help get riders closer to that point.

The data from entire rides being useful? Not so much.
 

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Wait... Nothing about braking data informs braking efficiency because there are far too many variables at play. The data is real, of course, but the bike needs to stay rubber side down... You can always go through a turn faster, but you can also ride off a cliff or slide 1/2 of your right side skin off. In a race car doing hundreds of exactly the same oval course laps in dry conditions it may have some benefit. But even in that case, temps, sun, accumulated rubber, other drivers and lines that you can't get... Then go to cycling? The closest relative to that is a cycling sport where they don't even use brakes. Even a crit... Left, right, sun, heat, shade, tire pressure, traffic.... Seems kind of ridiculous to me and I'm a data junkie. Again, just too many variables in play to make that data, which is a series of correlations, useful in an applied setting.
 

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Again, just too many variables in play to make that data, which is a series of correlations, useful in an applied setting.
I haven't seen data from this device but I've seen data excerpts from a couple of multi-axis accelerometers that were mounted on a DH MTB frame and on a rider. The rider went down the same course multiple times but I was only allowed to see samples of the data, only for one run, and only for this one rider. The rider was a national-class elite rider -- I was told that if they let me see an average "good" rider's data file that the difference would have been obvious but since I didn't see one I don't know if they were exaggerating.
 

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I haven't seen data from this device but I've seen data excerpts from a couple of multi-axis accelerometers that were mounted on a DH MTB frame and on a rider. The rider went down the same course multiple times but I was only allowed to see samples of the data, only for one run, and only for this one rider. The rider was a national-class elite rider -- I was told that if they let me see an average "good" rider's data file that the difference would have been obvious but since I didn't see one I don't know if they were exaggerating.
Maybe it's the next great innovation, but it strikes me as finding a purpose for a device someone came up with... Like bio-feedback (or a polygraph, a more sophisticated version of the same thing), someone came up with a way to visually demonstrate how relaxed (or not) you are. In the vast majority of instances it's completely unnecessary... People are able to recognize relaxation accurately. I'd think DH MTB racers can recognize braking patterns and make decisions about risk... Then they get a device that tells them to accept greater risk? It doesn't determine braking levels that allow you to remain upright, it just shows braking pattern. That fine line that exists between maxing out speed and staying upright is a determining factor in descending of all sorts... I'd think, at elite levels, racers would have a good handle on how to get to the bottom of a mountain the most efficient way that leaves them upright? The one who gets those two things the closest, who accepts the most risk without going down is the one who wins? Maybe a devise that shows them where and how hard they brake helps them do that? But I think they already know and can recognize what the device tells them just like people can know and recognize when they are relaxed. In both examples, some coaching or a visual might help in early stages but it seems so artificial... Again, a device being used because someone invented it... But that's all just uninformed personal opinion on braking, maybe it makes the difference between a podium and not?
 

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This latest gadget is only a tool. There will be those who say "you gotta have it if you are going to race". Just like those who say that "you have to have a power meter if you are going to race". No you don't. Not saying wouldn't help. Not saying that but back in the early/mid 80's when I was racing, nobody had a power meter and yet somehow we were all competitive and managed to survive without one.

Me, I'm old school. I rely on a computer. It processes audio, visual and tactile information and through a muscular/skeletal system makes the appropriate adjustments.
 
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