Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,255 Posts
We have a similar law in Florida that went into effect in 2008. There was some mention of it in the press around the effective date, but I don't think many drivers are aware of the requirement.....I'm often passed with much less than 3 feet of clearance on my left.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,254 Posts
Morons are generally bad spellers.

Their craziest argument is that the law is unenforceable.

What they're not realizing is that the onus is placed on the driver in the event of any accident. The driver either has to wait for the cyclist, or safely pass. If the driver hits the cyclist they will be cited for a 3 foot violation.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,254 Posts
cdhbrad said:
We have a similar law in Florida that went into effect in 2008. There was some mention of it in the press around the effective date, but I don't think many drivers are aware of the requirement.....I'm often passed with much less than 3 feet of clearance on my left.
Yeah, I'm in Florida too. Some of the worst offenders are passive aggressive bus drivers. The wind and vacuum they create when they blow by you can almost knock you over or under the bus. I'm really conscious of them and have sometimes taken the preventative action of going up on the sidewalk when they are about to pass.

Another rider mentioned the bus drivers to me and noted they were aggressive before I agreed with him so it's not just me.

Lots of angry [email protected] out there. I don't understand it.
 

·
LCI #1853
Joined
·
134 Posts
Speaking from one of the 13 states that already have the 3-foot passing law in place, it's a good law, but it's almost never enforced. We've had ours here in Arkansas since 2007, no one has ever been cited for violating it. Tennessee's 3-foot passing law didn't protect David Meek in Chattanooga early last month when a mail truck buzzed him, caught his left pannier, and dragged him under the truck's rear wheels. The driver was neither charged nor indicted by the grand jury.

Looking at the comments, you have to remember that as cyclists we're often our own worst enemy when it comes to our behavior in traffic. Running stop signs and red lights, weaving in and out of the cars, riding the wrong way... Never mind that far more drivers break the law than do cyclists, when they see us do it, they vividly remember it. When they do it themselves, it's okay, because every single motorist believes him- or herself to be a safe, above-average driver.

The 3-foot laws are great, but in most cases they have no real effect if they aren't publicized or enforced.
 

·
Just Plain Bitter
Joined
·
8,602 Posts
Some very narrow minded comments as well as some legitimate *****es. I am blessed with great bike lanes and good roads where I live. Still I see many cyclists set bad examples that create this animosity towards us. It is unfortunate that we all have to ride around with a target on our backs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
It is the few that stand out and make the situation bad. I rarely have a problem with cars here in NJ but every now and then I get a reminder to how blind and dumb the drivers can be. On the other side I think many drivers don't hate us cyclists until they come up on retards running 4 wide or in the middle of the road.

I was riding the other day and came up on some women; one of them was waving into the middle of the road (a fast 45+ mph road). I just shook my head and moved on...

I don't think the law will be very effective, but it is necessary. I think what needs to happen is just show kids in driver's ed what can happen if you hit someone on a bike while in a car, even with just a mirror. The more people understand how much damage a small piece of their car can do the more likely they are to avoid cyclists with a greater degree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,846 Posts
The proposed bill is another example of feel good legislation, that lets someone say he supports bicycle saftey without commiting state funds, or actually doing anything about it.

The bill if passed, won't ever be enforced, and as a practical matter is unenforceable. Nor would it have prevented the accident cited, which was the result of an error in judgement regarding bike and bus separation.

In NJ as in most states bicyclists have rights of way on public roads (with exceptions) and as in other states, the passed vehicle has the right of way over the overtaking vehicle, which can only pass if it can be done safely without an adjustment by the passed vehicle.

What's needed isn't new laws, but better driver education and awareness, something not so easily legislated. If the State of NY is serious about improving bicycle safety, maybe it could commit a few budget dollars to production and airing of "share the road" PSA's.
 

·
Steaming piles of opinion
Joined
·
10,503 Posts
cdhbrad said:
...I don't think many drivers are aware of the requirement.....I'm often passed with much less than 3 feet of clearance on my left.
The drivers that are the problems believe - honestly believe - that we aren't supposed to be on the road as a matter of law. Most buzz-cuts I receive are accompanied by a 'get on the sidewalk' holler.

I've had opportunity to discuss this with a few of them, and to a person, they earnestly believed that we didn't have legal right to the road and belonged on the sidewalk - completely aside from the animosity that we're in their way, cheat stopsigns, etc.

Education is the answer, and while these sorts of laws are largely feel-good efforts, they the start the ball rolling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,846 Posts
danl1 said:
The drivers that are the problems believe - honestly believe - that we aren't supposed to be on the road as a matter of law. Most buzz-cuts I receive are accompanied by a 'get on the sidewalk' holler.

I've had opportunity to discuss this with a few of them, and to a person, they earnestly believed that we didn't have legal right to the road and belonged on the sidewalk - completely aside from the animosity that we're in their way, cheat stopsigns, etc.

Education is the answer, and while these sorts of laws are largely feel-good efforts, they the start the ball rolling.
Yes, education is the answer, but laws like this won't do anything unless they're coupled with a firm commitment of dollars to advertise the law. Otherwise they only raise the expectations of cyclists, without actually delivering any benefits. The end result is increased tension on the road, not less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,474 Posts
danl1 said:
The drivers that are the problems believe - honestly believe - that we aren't supposed to be on the road as a matter of law. .
This one comment to the story illustrates it well: the person who wrote it clearly believes there are only two alternatives in the situation he describes: risk a head-on crash or buzz the cyclist. The third alternative of waiting until it's safe to pass is simply not acceptable to the writer.

"I will NEVER put my life and another innocent motorist's life at risk by crossing a double yellow line to avoid one of these jerks on a bike on a country road with blind spots. We'll be dead in a head on collision and the bike will be going on his merry way."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,934 Posts
Yeah in Florida it works real well....

a City of Coral Gables Truck with the bumper sticker stating this knocked my over with the trailer he was towing in September. I guess He was NOT aware of the law. The Metro Buses here are the worst.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,846 Posts
lookrider said:
Morons are generally bad spellers.

Their craziest argument is that the law is unenforceable.

What they're not realizing is that the onus is placed on the driver in the event of any accident. The driver either has to wait for the cyclist, or safely pass. If the driver hits the cyclist they will be cited for a 3 foot violation.
I don't know what the bad speller point references, but as to whether the law would or even could be enforced, I respectfully stand by my post. Current law already places the burden on the passing vehicle without needing to argue about the distance of separation.

The new law won't change anything. The fact that there's a collision doesn't prove anything either way because it can and will be argued that the cyclist didn't hold his line, rendering it moot, unless an eyewitness says otherwise.

We already have too way many narrowly written, sporadically enforced laws, we don't need more.
 

·
What? Me worry?
Joined
·
811 Posts
FBinNY has is right. The 3 foot law is another fine example of useless legislation passed by politicians more interested in pandering to simpletons than in actually addressing a difficult and politically dangerous topic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,583 Posts
This is going to sound crazy stupid but before I started riding on the road I used to not swerve over to go around riders, intentionally.

And I didn't know the law but actually believed law or not cyclist had at least as much right to the road as I did.

I didn't swerve because I figured the cyclist would hold their line and I didn't want them to feel that I thought they needed me to take care of them. Some weird way of me showing respect.

Now that I do ride on the road, respect be damned, please just move over a few feet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
314 Posts
wim said:
This one comment to the story illustrates it well: the person who wrote it clearly believes there are only two alternatives in the situation he describes: risk a head-on crash or buzz the cyclist. The third alternative of waiting until it's safe to pass is simply not acceptable to the writer.

"I will NEVER put my life and another innocent motorist's life at risk by crossing a double yellow line to avoid one of these jerks on a bike on a country road with blind spots. We'll be dead in a head on collision and the bike will be going on his merry way."
Isn't that sad when I remember being taught in driver education that you were supposed to adjust your speed so that you would not be caught in that situation. You should slow down, or speed up, whichever is safer, so that you would not pass both the oncoming car and bicycle at the same time.

The arrogance and ignorance of some people astound me.
:mad2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
dummest law ever. How does anyone expect the motorist to understand the perception of a three foot buffer when driving? I see a bike, i try not to hit him or her. Easy
I don't want to drive on the same road as the moron who can't tell whether his car is < 3 feet from something, nevermind ride a bike :mad2:

I agree that this would just be a feel good law. If you pass a slower moving car and side swipe it or run into an oncoming car head on, the law is generally pretty clear that you're responsible. I don't see how it would be different for a cyclist.

ETA: even better:
The law that should be passed would permit and require cyclists to ride on the opposite side of the road facing oncoming traffic, They could then see whats coming and take necessary action,it's very hard to cyclists to know whats coming behind them. They could also react with the driver and both could see what each is doing.
So, since the closing speed is a problem with bikes and cars, let's effectively increase the closing speed by ~20mph by making cyclists ride against traffic. Brilliant!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69,526 Posts
I don't think 3' is enough room at speeds on most roadways. What I never understood was a dead cyclist and no citation because the motorist didn't see the cyclist. We had that happen here on a two lane one way service road with visibility up to half a mile ahead. try that argument after you rear end or side swipe a motor vehicle. What is needed is some serious prosecution to enforce the vehicle laws that already apply.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top