Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Cat 3 in TT, Cat 6 in Rd.
Joined
·
226 Posts
I'd go tubular. Get some KinLin tb-25's laced to some Joytechs. Cheap, light, reliable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
960 Posts
I have a set of wheels built up with these rims. They are really nice, especially for the weight. Much stiffer than a light weight Kinlin clincher rim. But I went with 28 hole front and 32 hole rear, King hubs laced with revs on the front and NDS, comps on the DS.
 

·
Not Banned
Joined
·
49,013 Posts
go tubular

mcoplea said:
Anyone have any experience with these wheels yet? - http://www.notubes.com/product_info.php/cPath/42_683/products_id/520

The 18 spoke count for the front has me a little concerned. It might be better to buy 2 of the 24 hole rims and build them up for cross.

On the fence between getting these or going tubular. Any thoughts?
what makes a tubular tire better is the supple sidewall casing. You cannot pull that off with a clincher as the sidewall holds the tire to the rim.

tubeless for cx is a solution to a problem that doesn't exist other than people are scared of glueing tires. It is as easy or easier than setting up a tubeless system and provides superior results. Also you can get used tubbie wheels dirt cheap or new Williams Wheels for $400
 

·
Iohannes fac totum
Joined
·
3,151 Posts
atpjunkie said:
what makes a tubular tire better is the supple sidewall casing. You cannot pull that off with a clincher as the sidewall holds the tire to the rim.

tubeless for cx is a solution to a problem that doesn't exist other than people are scared of glueing tires. It is as easy or easier than setting up a tubeless system and provides superior results. Also you can get used tubbie wheels dirt cheap or new Williams Wheels for $400

I'm just going to call you "The Tubular Evangelist.":) I'm almost sold. Just built up some new tubeless wheels for CX.......but oh so close to building up a tubular set for the road.
 

·
Not Banned
Joined
·
49,013 Posts
I'm big

88 rex said:
I'm just going to call you "The Tubular Evangelist.":) I'm almost sold. Just built up some new tubeless wheels for CX.......but oh so close to building up a tubular set for the road.
I rode clinchers my first season. On the last race of my rookie year I had it f'ing WON. HAd a considerable gap on the field and on the last lap I dropped the only rider left with me. I pinch flatted my front tire shortly thereafter, rode the final 1/2 lap w/ a front flat. Still finished 4th (yes big gap) crashing 3x en route and destroying the front wheel. I crossed the finish line tossed my bike and said 'that's it I'M GOING TUBULAR"
I have never looked back. There is no greater upgrade you can do for a cx bike, and it is cheap to do.
Imagine your whole life only having sex with a condom
now imagine shagging without
the prophet has spoken
I would take a set of Reflex Rims laced 32 3x to a decent hub with a set of cheap Tufo training tubs over the best tubeless system out there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
960 Posts
For racing, tubulars are the only way to go. I use the tubeless tires for training rides on gravel and dirt roads. I also have a set built up for road training. They ride good and I haven't had a flat yet.
 

·
Res Firma....
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the input. I tried to buy Condog's wheelset, but I guess my PM did not make it through to him.

If anyone else is selling a good set of tublars - feel free to shoot me a PM.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
mcoplea said:
If anyone else is selling a good set of tublars - feel free to shoot me a PM.
I agree with ATP that tubulars are better than tubeless. I disagree however they are a solution to a problem that doesn't exist. Please note that I am 145 and he is a clydesdale so therein lies the difference. Tubeless can be a cost effective solution if you are under 175 and don't mind tinkering for a couple of weeks until you get it just right. As you can see there are a bunch of qualifiers in the above statement, which is why there are still plenty of us that suggest anyone even semi-serious about their racing to go tubular.


Corndog's wheels were Campy. Were you looking for Campy or Shimano/sram?

If you can get a deal like those, go carbon, otherwise, just go aluminum.

These are pretty good: http://www.neuvationcycling.com/product170.html
 

·
Do not touch the trim.
Joined
·
2,381 Posts
euro-trash said:
I agree with ATP that tubulars are better than tubeless. I disagree however they are a solution to a problem that doesn't exist. Please note that I am 145 and he is a clydesdale so therein lies the difference. Tubeless can be a cost effective solution if you are under 175 and don't mind tinkering for a couple of weeks until you get it just right. As you can see there are a bunch of qualifiers in the above statement, which is why there are still plenty of us that suggest anyone even semi-serious about their racing to go tubular.


Corndog's wheels were Campy. Were you looking for Campy or Shimano/sram?

If you can get a deal like those, go carbon, otherwise, just go aluminum.

These are pretty good:

I'm 145-150 and really tried to like tubeless when I came back to cross racing but no matter how much I fussed, and I'm good at this as I currently have 3 MTB's set up ghetto tubeless, I could not get them to stay put at anything resembling low pressures. The biggest problems were jamming the bike hard into a corner and remounting on off camber sections, they burped. Finally gave up and went tubular again. Running tubulars is the same reason I use a robust (heavier) aluminum seatpost and collar, I would kick myself if I lost a win because of a bad equipment choice.
 

·
Not Banned
Joined
·
49,013 Posts
this here

OnTheRivet said:
Running tubulars is the same reason I use a robust (heavier) aluminum seatpost and collar, I would kick myself if I lost a win because of a bad equipment choice.
is what we call 'wisdom'

steve e_f clearly shows it is far less hassle than one imagines
I typically glue tires when I'm out smoking tasty pork parts

when you have the hickory smoke in the air, a beer in hand and one has to mind the fire, it makes the perfect time to do some gluing
 

·
Polka Power
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
The burping thing is all about the rim having a bench for the tire bead to sit on...and that bench being "tall" enough that the bead sits tightly onto it. Depends on rim/tire setup obviously, but if its burping you can probably fix it by adding another layer of tape or thicker tape on the bench...assuming the rim is of somewhat proper design (bench). This also aides with inflation (floor pump = easy) if the tape is in the center as well.

Went back and forth with that a lot running crappy tires on non-tubeless rims for the mtb...and have it down well enough that I can run ~12psi in the snow, slide all over...catch hard...rip turns, etc...with zero problems. Also abuse the hell out of it with more normal pressure and no problems.

And taking the tube out makes most tires feel WAY better and feel faster. Fixes most, but not all pinch flats. Fixes most punctures (not slits). So it's def not a solution for no problem, IMO. Tubes suck.

/not gonna argue the tubie/tubeless argument otherwise.
 

·
Res Firma....
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
euro-trash said:
I agree with ATP that tubulars are better than tubeless. I disagree however they are a solution to a problem that doesn't exist. Please note that I am 145 and he is a clydesdale so therein lies the difference. Tubeless can be a cost effective solution if you are under 175 and don't mind tinkering for a couple of weeks until you get it just right. As you can see there are a bunch of qualifiers in the above statement, which is why there are still plenty of us that suggest anyone even semi-serious about their racing to go tubular.


Corndog's wheels were Campy. Were you looking for Campy or Shimano/sram?

If you can get a deal like those, go carbon, otherwise, just go aluminum.

These are pretty good: http://www.neuvationcycling.com/product170.html
Thanks. I was looking for Shimano/Sram. These are for my 16 year-old son who weighs in at 128 lbs. He is planning on trying to get an invite to the Euro Cross Camp this year and I am trying to give his the best set up we can afford.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
mcoplea said:
These are for my 16 year-old son who weighs in at 128 lbs. He is planning on trying to get an invite to the Euro Cross Camp this year and I am trying to give his the best set up we can afford.
I don't have those wheels right now, but keep on the board; if there are parts you need, I'm guessing there are many of us this board who would be willing to contribute/sell at the bro deal to contribute to the efforts of a junior trying to go to eurocamp. If he is at that level, definitely go tubular. At that level, go Challenge--Dugast and Challenge are great (and $$$), but won't make the difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
960 Posts
The Notubes rims are really expensive for an aluminum clincher rim. Your son really needs to be on tubulars if planning on doing serious racing. They don't have to be expensive (and shouldn't' be!) though.

One Stans rim is like $110 retail! You can get two Kinlin TB25 rims for that price.

Some of those laced up to Dura Ace hubs (or Ultegra) would be perfect. Then get some Challange Grifos and call it good.

The best set of tubulars are the ones you can afford two (or more :) ) sets of!.

Also, my wheels for sale were Campy but I had access to a Shimano freehub for them. They are already sold though :)
 

·
Not Banned
Joined
·
49,013 Posts
yes you can build up

or buy used tubulars far cheaper
there was a chance to buy 2 sets of quality wheels on ebay a month ago for around $400.
That's $200 a wheelset
add tubs and BANG ready
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
Top