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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a long (75Mile, 5000 vert 90d F) ride this weekend I realized how little I know about nutrition/hydration for this type of ride. I think I possibly had a case of heat exhaustion that I have never experienced - even on the exact same ride and same conditions. What changed, I don’t know, but after puking my guts out while curled up at the bottom of the shower, and that’s just the stuff I’m willing to write, I have decided my nutrition/hydration regimen is not working.

Basically a 4 hour ride - 64-70 oz of water, 8 oz powerade, 1 cliff bar, 4 or 5 shot blocks

So what are the basics? When do you need more than just water and “bars” and what should be in them?

Has anyone found a good source for this type of info?

Thanks for the help!
 

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The "general" rule is to eat real food on rides over 2.5 - 3 hours. I say general because it's different for everybody...what works for one, won't work for others. Some people have great results with Gu packets but can't stomach Cliff Shots (or vise-versa).

However, food intake may not have been your problem.

The heat sounds like more of your problem than your food intake, unless you've had this problem before on cooler rides of the similar distance/effort. If that's the case, then you need to look at your food intake and make changes...which I'd suggest real food for rides that long...bananas, fig newtons, PBJ, etc. You may also like Honey packets that you can get from any resturant...those are great and cheap little energy packets.

Even by drinking tons you could have been suffering heat related problems...which until you were able to get your core temperature down were suffering ill effects from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wookiebiker said:
The "general" rule is to eat real food on rides over 2.5 - 3 hours. I say general because it's different for everybody...what works for one, won't work for others. Some people have great results with Gu packets but can't stomach Cliff Shots (or vise-versa).

However, food intake may not have been your problem.

The heat sounds like more of your problem than your food intake, unless you've had this problem before on cooler rides of the similar distance/effort. If that's the case, then you need to look at your food intake and make changes...which I'd suggest real food for rides that long...bananas, fig newtons, PBJ, etc. You may also like Honey packets that you can get from any resturant...those are great and cheap little energy packets.

Even by drinking tons you could have been suffering heat related problems...which until you were able to get your core temperature down were suffering ill effects from.
Actually good thought on the “real” food. For whatever reason I didn’t start eating early with things like a banana - something I generally do without giving it any thought. Saturday was hot for the PNW but I generally revel in the heat and typically ride better the hotter it gets – I was “off” all day. Never had a problem with heat -ever. I’m hoping a modified ride diet will help.

I like your other suggestions as well – PBJ, and fig bars – things I like and think I could eat/stomach on longer rides. I’ll give it a go. Funny, before the days of bars and goos this is what I use to eat. THANKS – for the reminder.

I don’t care for the supplemented drinks so mostly stick with water except for longer harder efforts i.e. the watered down powerade I mentioned above. You think more or different liquid supplements (other than h2o) would help?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
BluRooster said:
90's kinda hot. What did you eat the night before? What did you eat right after the ride?
Where do you live? Lot's of fires in No Cal, and I know I felt a little crummy yesterday and I only rode 20 mi. It was tough breathing, but I went out anyway.

http://cyclingnutrition.blogspot.com/2008/02/hydrate-and-eat-right-to-go-distance.html
http://www.velonews.com/article/11948

Your links were great - and confirmed some of the suggestions from Wookiebiker re "real food".

The velonews article nailed me, I had a quick 1.5 hour ride Friday night, up early Saturday for the long ride with not much thought given to dinner and breakfast.

Dinner – 2 slices pizza, salad, 1 beer.
Breakfast – oatmeal, toast, 2 cups coffee.

Clearly time to pay a bit more attention to my diet.

I live north of you in Portland ( no BIG summer fires yet although lots of lightning tonight) Its been a bit windy the last couple of days so air quality not an issue. Looks like you’re going to have a long hot summer in Norcal.

THANKS FOR THE THOUGHTS!!!
 

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I regularly ride far, 8.5 hours non-stop this past saturday in 90F+ heat and high humidity(roughly 150 miles with 14k ascent) , and don't eat any solid food while riding. In cooler temps, I'll sometimes eat solid food, but I find it difficult to carry everything if I'm eating bars or even harder with stuff like bananas. I'm usually riding at a hard pace the entire time and find it difficult to palate and/or digest any sort of solid food.

Hammer Perpetuem is my only source of food on long distance rides. One 24oz bottle lasts me four hours. I'll fill one bottle at the start and have the other bottle cage with another 24oz bottle with only the powder.

i also ride with a 2L camelbak. the 2L is nearing it's end about the same time as the first 4 hour perpetuem bottle. This is my one short stop of the day on a ride like above. Refill the camelbak and fill up the other 24oz bottle. Ready to go for another 4 hours.

In the high heat I usually have to stop once more for another 2L of water.

WIth the Hammer I use 6 scoops per bottle and sip it every 10 to 15 minutes. I weigh about 160.

Also, I usually bring a flask of gel w/ caffiene for the occasional extra dose of calories.
 

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Nothing wrong with 'real food' if you can handle it, but irrelevant to your question. If your problem was calories, then any carbohydrate calorie source would work, 'real' or not. – TF
 

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your experience sounds like classic heat exhaustion, as simply failing to eat enough on a ride won't typically result in the nausea you describe. I'm guessing the stuff you're not willing to write about includes frequent trips to the toilet....google heat exhaustion, causes and treatment, and prevention.
 
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