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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to get something to drink for my commute to work and after. (for weekend riding also, of course but mostly for my commute to work) I don’t have a far commute, 4-5 miles one way. After work, I tend to go on some rides with my friends and on the weekend, I am pretty much riding everywhere I go. I am 5’7 and about 150lbs. I am looking to get lean and after I get home, I want to start working out my upper body and abs with basic weight training using dumbbells and sit-up/push-ups.

I have never taken any kind of supplement and I am unsure of what to take. When I get to work, my legs are slightly sore the rest of the day but it is nothing major. I don’t notice it while I am sitting down but going up and down the stairs reminds me of the soreness real quick. I was looking at getting the CytoMax Energy Drink Mix and the CytoSport Complete Whey Drink Mix. I don’t know if that is a good choice and I was wondering if I should get something else.

Does anyone recommend something better or is that good enough for me?

Thanks,
Ugly
 

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for those short rides water is fine. You could mix up gatorade as well. Gatorade/powerade powder is way cheap, but it is sweet, so I thin it with a little more water. You could also use gatorade endurance, which has more potassium and sodium. For very short rides you won't sweat nearly enough to need anything other than water and maybe some carbs.
For the longer rides, it depends on how much you sweat. If you sweat like crazy during longer rides something like cytomax might be good. If you eat healthy to begin with the whey protein is probably just a waste.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I aim for healthy eating but come up just short. I tend to a healthy lunch and I skip breakfast here and there because I am too lazy to wake up a bit earlier sometimes. Dinner is a bit harder, I’m 23 and tend to eat fast food a lot but really trying to cut back on it.

I actually do sweat a lot and I think it’s because I drink so much water throughout the day. For breakfast, I should just stick to a piece of bread with some peanut butter on it, huh?

I tend to ride about 50+ miles on the weekends with my friends because we ride everywhere! (freaking gas prices!) For that, I am going to look into that Gatorade and Powerade mixes.

Thanks,
Ugly
 

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You sweat quite a bit while sleeping. I always make sure I drink a few glasses of fluids in the morning with breakfast. When i'm in a rush I do PB toast. Also, a good little snack that is portable and cheap are Costco brand slim-fasts. They have a bit of sugar and protein along with a bunch of vitamins and minerals. Protein supplements are good if you don't get enough protein in your diet through foods.

If you ride 50 miles in a single ride, cytomax might be more appropriate during the hot summer months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I try to drink a glass of water right after I wake up and before I head out the door. Even on my way to work I’m dripping sweat and that’s only a 5 mile ride.

We don’t do 50 miles in a single ride but through out the day, we tend to ride here and there. We ride to breakfast, Lunch and Dinner. We ride to visit friends, the market, get ice cream/smoothies or anywhere we wanna go until it’s time for the night life/bars.

I think the Cytomax might be a big help during the summer but for now I’m trying out the Gatorade stuff to see how that works out for me. Once it starts getting REALLY hot I’ll see if that Cytomax might be a bit more suitable.

I’m also totally looking into those slim-fast as a breakfast replacement to leave at my desk at work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was thinking that so i'm going to go pick up some Oxycottons from my local pharmacy.
 

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Are you new on the bike? A five mile (each way) commute shouldn't have your legs sore in the morning. If anything try some stretches before clipping in and riding off. Also is the fit of your bike correct, and is your rear-end used to the saddle yet?

I'm 5'7", 135lbs ride to work in the morning, play sports, swim and watch over kids from 8:00am - 5:00pm every weekday. 4 out of five days a week I'll go on a 25-35 mile ride directly after work. I drink tons of water, take my fair share of vitamins and suppliments(fish oil, things to protect my failing kidneys and liver), and make sure my blood sugar is in control since I've had diabetes for 21 years (I'm 22). I also run two 2.5 mile sprints when going to the gym twice a week, and do moderate reps on most machines.

All I have to say is "ride more", since I do not know your physical disposition on why your body is acting how it is in the mornings...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No i was serious. of course i want to get an addiction to Oxy JUST to take the soreness out of my legs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes, the bike is fitted to my size and I am use to the saddle but I am new to exercise in general. I just started riding my bike less than a year ago. Before that I barely played any sports and would park as close to whatever shop I was going to, just to avoid walking a distance. I have never taken any kind of vitamin or supplements. I drink pretty regularly and on the weekends I drink excessively. I Just started cutting down on my smoking, before I was smoking about a pack in 2 days. Riding more is definitely something I have to do and I understand that. What I was asking wasn’t what you do. I was wondering if that stuff should be something I should look into. I am not talking about my legs being sore to the point where I can’t walk. My legs just feel a burn when I walk up and down the stairs, which I do often. I just wanted someone to answer my question of…should I buy this or should I not buy this. Is this right for me or am I okay with just drinking water or Gatorade.

Awesome for you, you are active 95% of your day. I sit on my butt for 8-9 hours of the day in front of a computer for work. Your body is use to it and I do not get the exercise you do, hence why I asked the question.
 

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DGK*UGLY said:
Yes, the bike is fitted to my size and I am use to the saddle but I am new to exercise in general. I just started riding my bike less than a year ago. Before that I barely played any sports and would park as close to whatever shop I was going to, just to avoid walking a distance. I have never taken any kind of vitamin or supplements. I drink pretty regularly and on the weekends I drink excessively. I Just started cutting down on my smoking, before I was smoking about a pack in 2 days. Riding more is definitely something I have to do and I understand that. What I was asking wasn’t what you do. I was wondering if that stuff should be something I should look into. I am not talking about my legs being sore to the point where I can’t walk. My legs just feel a burn when I walk up and down the stairs, which I do often. I just wanted someone to answer my question of…should I buy this or should I not buy this. Is this right for me or am I okay with just drinking water or Gatorade.
Save the calories for when you are exercising hard for more than an hour.

Cutting back on smoking usually comes with a bit of weight gain, if you are conscious of it you can avoid that.

Booze is more or less empty calories. French paradox refers to drinking a glass or two of wine with dinner, not drinking a six-pack while watching Letterman.

5'7" 150# sounds like you don't have that much weight to lose, right? I mean, you are starting from a pretty good place.

Muscle soreness isn't evidence of anything wrong per se. World class cyclists get sore muscles, it just takes more for them to get sore.
 

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Stretch after....

Stretch after you ride as well. The burning you are feeling is a build up of lactic acid in the muscle. Stretching will help you squeeze the lactic acid out. Stretch the calf, quad, hammys for 30 seconds per muscle per side after every ride.
Also, don't forget to drink a lot of water. The water will also help dissipate the lactic acid. Drink at least 8 to 10 8oz glasses of water a day. Not soda, not diet soda, not vitamin water.....just plain water!
Also, forget the supplements, they wreak havoc on kidneys, liver and cell tissue. Eat REAL FOOD, drink real drinks whenever you can. I drink water, and on a long ride, I will mix gatorade 50/50. Avoid artificial sweeteners at all costs.
 

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pretender said:
Please somebody with more of the ex. phys. background respond to this.
And I quote:
Minimizing Lactic Acid Build-Up

What's a Cyclist to Do? By Miriam Nelson
WebMD Medical News

June 25, 2001 -- I want to commend you on your dedication to training properly for such a big event -- I hope the race goes very well for you and the other cyclists. In response to your question, you can prevent the buildup of lactic acid to some extent through particular training practices, which include appropriate nutrition habits and sport-specific training routines.


It is important to understand how and why lactic acid accumulates in the muscles. When glucose is burned for fuel during exercise, it is broken down to a chemical called pyruvate. If you are working at a low enough intensity, sufficient oxygen will be available to easily convert pyruvate to carbon dioxide and water, which are removed by the lungs. When you are working at a very high intensity, however, there is not enough oxygen to convert all the pyruvate to carbon dioxide and water. The result is that some of the pyruvate is converted to lactic acid, which builds up in the muscles and overflows into the bloodstream. Lactic acid causes the "burning" sensation felt in muscles during high intensity exercise and also prevents muscles from working their best.


Nutrition and Fluids

First and foremost, stay well-hydrated at all times. This includes before, during, and after training sessions as well as throughout day-to-day activities. During the training sessions and directly afterward, try to consume foods that are easily absorbed and digested. This can include sports replacement drinks. In addition, make sure that you eat soon after each training session -- within the first fifteen minutes if at all possible -- to help replenish your depleted glycogen stores. Your post-exercise snack should include a carbohydrate-protein combination.


Exercise Training

Interval training is the key to reducing lactic acid buildup during races. Your training program leading up to an event should include some interval training two to three days per week. An interval training session consists of high intensity periods interspersed with moderate intensity periods. Your body will learn how to buffer the lactic acid that is created through the alternating high intensity workouts in interval training. During the race, this adaptation will allow you to continue at a higher intensity for a longer duration without feeling the negative effects of the lactic acid building up in your muscles. Of course, on the other days of the week you should perform longer, lower intensity training sessions. Remember, these workouts should be specific to the sporting event (in your case, cycling), and don't forget to stretch properly before and after your workouts.


The combination of good nutrition, hydration, and appropriate training practices will allow you to compete at a high intensity without allowing lactic acid to limit your performance.



Miriam Nelson is an associate professor of nutrition and director of the Center for Physical Fitness at the School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.
 

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wmayes said:
And I quote:
Minimizing Lactic Acid Build-Up

What's a Cyclist to Do? By Miriam Nelson
WebMD Medical News
This article says nothing about stretching "squeezing out" lactic acid. And lactic acid does not cause post-exercise soreness.

http://www.drmirkin.com/fitness/1346.html

Many people think that cooling down by exercising at a very slow pace after exercising more vigorously, helps to prevent muscle soreness. It doesn't. Cooling down speeds up the removal of lactic acid from muscles, but a buildup of lactic acid does not cause muscle soreness, so cooling down will not help to prevent muscle soreness. Stretching does not prevent soreness either, since post-exercise soreness is not due to contracted muscle fibers.
 

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Another reason to stretch

pretender said:
Please somebody with more of the ex. phys. background respond to this.
I have all the background you need. I have been running/training and now cycling for many years combined. I have owned a gym and I am a certified trainer and nutrition counselor. Here is another article on stretching and lactic acid:

Static stretching of fatigued muscles (see section Static Stretching) performed immediately following the exercise(s) that caused the fatigue, helps not only to increase flexibility, but also enhances the promotion of muscular development (muscle growth), and will actually help decrease the level of post-exercise soreness. Here's why:

After you have used weights (or other means) to overload and fatigue your muscles, your muscles retain a "pump" and are shortened somewhat. This "shortening" is due mostly to the repetition of intense muscle activity that often only takes the muscle through part of its full range of motion. This "pump" makes the muscle appear bigger. The "pumped" muscle is also full of lactic acid and other by-products from exhaustive exercise. If the muscle is not stretched afterward, it will retain this decreased range of motion (it sort of "forgets" how to make itself as long as it could) and the buildup of lactic acid will cause post-exercise soreness. Static stretching of the "pumped" muscle helps it to become "looser", and to "remember" its full range of movement. It also helps to remove lactic acid and other waste-products from the muscle. While it is true that stretching the "pumped" muscle will make it appear visibly smaller, it does not decrease the muscle's size or inhibit muscle growth. It merely reduces the "tightness" (contraction) of the muscles so that they do not "bulge" as much.
 
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