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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking of moving from the cool rains of Seattle to somewhere near San Diego. Never been there in my life so I don't have a reference point to go by, but I was wondering if anyone that has ridden in both area can describe the difference in riding conditions. Is it hilly or flat? Are there trees for shade, or just cacti? How long would it take me to adjust from NW cat 4/masters to a SW cat 4/masters?

I have been to Phoenix and found it hot as hell, kind of like someone sucked the life out of me and I felt like I was riding very poorly...that was late fall to winter :eek: I could not drink enough water to feel hydrated for more than even 40 miles.
 

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I haven't ridden in Seattle, so I can't compare, but I live in San Diego, so hopefully this will help: The San Diego area is fairly hilly. I have to do a lot of looking to find a ride of any length that's mostly flat. Most of the hills along the coast tend to be short - 1/2 to 1 mile, and some are fairly steep - 8-10% isn't unusual. There are some good longer climbs further inland. The climate is kind of curious - near the coast (within 10 miles or so) it's mild year-round. As you go further inland, it gradually turns to desert. Can't help you with racing, as I'm strictly a recreational rider.

Hope that helps,
Curt
 

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Everything helps :cool:
What temp would you consider mild? I would call 60 deg mild and 75 deg or more hot.

Also how do the drivers treat cyclists down there?
 

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LC said:
Everything helps :cool:
What temp would you consider mild? I would call 60 deg mild and 75 deg or more hot.
Daytime highs are typically 65-75 year round, though we'll usually get one or two weeks per year when the winds swing around from the East (the Santa Anna's), and brings in the hot air from the desert - that'll take the temps up into the high 80's to 90's, but that's the exception.


LC said:
Also how do the drivers treat cyclists down there?
Generally good. There are a lot of cyclists here, so that helps the drivers get used to it instead of them feeling like you shouldn't be there. One thing that helps a lot is that there's a good network of bike lanes (you can order a free map of bike paths/lanes/routes at http://www.ridelink.org/bicycle.html) - drivers are much more civil when you're not competing for the same lane.
 
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